Black charred-timber home embraces forest views in Zrich

April 2, 2019 by  
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In the midst of a centuries-old forest sits the Two Family House, an aptly named project that houses a pair of maisonette apartments for two families at the edge of Zürich, Switzerland. Local architecture firm Hajnoczky.Zanchetta Architekten collaborated with architect Angela Waibel on the design, which takes advantage of its wooded location with full-height windows that capture views of the changing landscape. Due to regulations that enforce minimal disturbance to the landscape, the building’s unusual triangular shape is dictated by the forest, which diagonally divided the parcel. To fit two homes onto the constrained space without compromising space and comfort, the architects used the slope of property to vertically separate the two apartments. Each of the four levels has a slightly different floor plan and size; the upper floors, for instance, have cantilevered elements, such as projecting windows, that increase floor space. The larger of the two maisonette apartments occupies the ground floor, which comprises the bedrooms, and the first floor, where the communal spaces are located. Since the building is set into the existing slope, both the ground floor and first floor have direct access to the gardens. The second apartment occupies the uppermost two floors. To make up for the smaller footprint, the upper apartment has access to three rooftop terraces. The building is primarily a timber-clad concrete structure, aside for the topmost level, which is built of timber construction. Related: Massive tree-like sculpture takes over Switzerland’s largest train station “To enhance the distinctiveness of the building, we have chosen a black timber facade to elegantly contrast with the surrounding nature,” the architects explain in a statement. “The tree grove is part of a forest arm that permeates through the city. From dense foliage in summer, the location metamorphoses in winter into a snowy scenery with a beautiful creek that flows to the lake of Zürich .” + Hajnoczky.Zanchetta Architekten Images © Lucas Peters

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Black charred-timber home embraces forest views in Zrich

A rare 1962 Airstream is a marvelous home with a whimsical, midcentury design

April 2, 2019 by  
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When it comes to restoring old Airstreams, there’s a bevy of beautiful design options out there. But the expert team from Colorado-based Timeless Travel Trailers has just unveiled a marvelous Airstream conversion that is really one for the books. The company had its task cut out for itself when a client asked Timeless Travel Trailers to restore a rare, almost 60-year-old trailer. The result? A gorgeous interior design scheme that pays homage to the Airstream’s midcentury origins thanks to a shiny aluminum interior skin, bamboo flooring and plenty of wood paneling. Like most aging Airstreams, this trailer has a very interesting history. In 1962, the Western Pacific Railroad Company commissioned 10 40-foot Airstream trailers to be used as housing for workers laying rail track. The provided trailers were different from Airstream ‘s typical size and layout in that they were manufactured by riveting two 20-foot trailers together. When Union Pacific Railroad acquired Western Pacific in 1989, most of the 10 trailers were put out to pasture, either completely destroyed, put in museums or auctioned off, which is how one man became the proud owner of one of these unique trailers. Related: This 1970s Airstream is an off-grid oasis for a family of six When tasked with converting the Western Pacific Airstream into a modern living space to be used as a vacation home , the team from Timeless Travel Trailers used the trailer’s history as inspiration. Once the exterior was gleamed back to the oh-so-recognizable Airstream shine, the interior was outfitted with a remarkable design worthy of the trailer’s storied past. The first thing to catch the eye is the glimmering aluminum skin that covers the walls and ceiling, creating a vibrant atmosphere that is enhanced by an undeniable mid-century flair. An extra-wide galley provides ample space for the central living room, which features wide-plank bamboo flooring  and cabinets made out of a rich walnut veneer. A custom-made sofa wraps around the space, providing plenty of room for socializing, something not often possible in most Airstreams. Additionally, horizontal windows provide optimal natural light that reflects playfully off the aluminum walls. In contrast to the heavy wood features and furnishings, the kitchen and bathroom feature solid white counters and geometric black-and-white ceramic backsplash. Throughout the space, additional furnishings speak to the midcentury style, such as the lime green pendant lamps and bright red accent walls. + Timeless Travel Trailers Via Curbed Images via Timeless Travel Trailers

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A rare 1962 Airstream is a marvelous home with a whimsical, midcentury design

Robots weave a 100% carbon-fiber love shrine for Chinas countryside

March 26, 2019 by  
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In the countryside of Zhejiang, China, Shanghai-based design studio Wutopia Lab has completed the Shrine of Whatslove, a robotically woven carbon-fiber structure devoted to love and marriage. Created in collaboration with digital construction team RoboticPlus.AI, the Shrine of Whatslove takes the shape of a red, triangular pavilion evocative of a giant bird’s nest. Billed as “China’s first all carbon-fiber structure,” the installation is built from 7,200 meters of continuous carbon-fiber bundles and was completed in 90 hours. Commissioned by the Fengyuzhu firm, Wutopia Lab was asked to design a thought-provoking structure on the grounds of its client’s Fangyukong Guesthouse project. Rather than a restaurant or bookstore, the architects tapped into the themes of love and marriage to “bring out a building that can inspire people to think [about] daily issues” and stimulate related discussion. Moreover, in a bold contrast to the region’s rural vernacular, Wutopia Lab decided on a robotically constructed pavilion built of carbon fiber in a bid to “rejuvenate the countryside.” Located at the main entrance of the Fangyukong Guesthouse next to a stream, the Shrine of Whatslove stands at a little over 13 feet in height and is nearly 12.5 feet in width. Robots wove the structure from a continuous strand of carbon fiber. Elevated on footings, the pavilion appears to float above the landscape and is strong enough to support the weight of four people. At night, the structure is illuminated from below, creating an ethereal glow in the landscape. Related: Robots weave an insect-inspired carbon-fiber forest in London “Love should be a beautiful and pure thing, but in reality it is always wrapped in layers of matter,” Wutopia Lab explained in a project statement. “I first formed the building directly with integrated triangle. The triangle as a motif also represents the original architectural prototype, shape of the shed built by ancestors. We decided to abandon materiality. Giving up concrete, steel, glass or wood to build the knot, inspired by the ‘Zhusiyingshe,’ a Chinese traditional culture wrapping red line around the idol for good luck, we used a red line to weave a shrine. The shrine is more a visual image of a red line than a physical space; it does not need to shelter from the wind.” + Wutopia Lab Images via CreatAR Images

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Robots weave a 100% carbon-fiber love shrine for Chinas countryside

This cabin offers outstanding views of Oaxaca from a massive, cantilevering terrace

March 26, 2019 by  
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Nature-based refuges come in many shapes and forms, but this gorgeous cabin in Oaxaca manages to capture the serenity of its location thanks to a massive, cantilevering terrace in addition to two spacious rooftop terraces. Designed by Mexican firm  LAMZ Arquitectura , the Teitipac Cabin features two interconnecting volumes that were made with reclaimed natural materials , including natural stone found on-site as well as reclaimed steel and wood. Located in the mountainous region of San Sebastián Teitipac in Oaxaca in southwestern Mexico, the beautiful cabin is actually made up of two separate volumes. This was a strategy employed by the architects to build the cabins into the smallest footprint possible without altering the existing natural terrain of oaks and copal trees. Related: Get away from it all in this off-grid concrete cabin just steps away from the Appalachian Trail Spanning a total of just under 2,000 feet, the cube-like volumes were set on a small hilltop to provide stunning views of the surrounding mountain range. According to the architects, the project design centered around providing an abundance of open-air spaces in order to take in these breathtaking views from anywhere on-site. In addition to providing a strong visual connection to the environment, the architects also wanted to create harmony between the man-made and the natural by using as many natural and reclaimed materials as possible. The cabins are tucked partially into the landscape, creating structures with various levels, including a basement embedded into the rocky landscape and two large rooftop terraces. The two structures are connected to a simple staircase that leads from one terrace to another. Several additional walkways wind around the cabin, leading past glass-panel enclosures and various entrances. Both of the volumes are clad in natural stone, which blends the structures into the rocky terrain. The cabin also features expansive glass panels that further drive the connection between the indoors and the outdoors. Additionally, throughout the interior living space, reclaimed wood was used in the flooring and ceilings. The two structures are divided according to their uses: one houses the communal living areas, while the other is home to the bedrooms. Clad in natural stone and wood, the interiors are warm and inviting. While outdoor space is abundant for both volumes, the master bedroom’s  cantilevering terrace is at the heart of the design. + LAMZ Arquitectura Via Archdaily Photography by Lorena Darquea via LAMZ Arquitectura

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This cabin offers outstanding views of Oaxaca from a massive, cantilevering terrace

Floating prefab architecture addresses climate change on Chengdus Jincheng Lake

November 26, 2018 by  
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Nigerian architect Kunlé Adeyemi of the firm NLÉ Architects recently unveiled his third iteration on the award-winning Makoko Floating School, a prefabricated building system aimed at addressing “the challenges and opportunities of urbanization and climate change” through sustainable and alternative building typologies. Dubbed the MFS IIIx3, the thought-provoking collection of structures has been set afloat on a lake in Chengdu, the capital of southwestern China’s Sichuan province. The project was created in collaboration with local Chengdu partners Fanmate Creative Furniture Company and Chengdu Keruijiesi Technology Company. Located on Jincheng Lake in Chengdu’s new ecological belt, MFS IIIx3 marks NLÉ Architects’ fourth prototype of the Makoko Floating School. The first prototype floating structure was built in 2013 for and by the historic water community of Makoko in Lagos, Nigeria, an area considered at-risk for climate change . Although the initial project has met its demise , the architects have gone on to improve and reiterate their designs. In 2016, the Waterfront Atlas (MFS II) was launched in Venice, Italy, as well as the Minne Floating School (MFS III) in Bruges, Belgium. In their latest take on the Makoko Floating School, the architects have recreated the modular building in three sizes — small, medium and large. All structures were prefabricated from wood and locally sourced bamboo . The collection of floating buildings includes an open-air concert hall, an indoor exhibition space and a small information center. All three spaces are organized around a communal plaza. Related: Sustainable Makoko Floating School in Nigeria is finally complete “MFS IIIx3 is introduced into the dynamics of a 2,200 year-old history of water management expertise, originating from the Min River (Minjiang) and from Dujiangyan — an ingenious irrigation system built in 256 BC, and still in use today — keeping the southwestern Sichuan province free of floods and drought and making it one of the most fertile and economically developed urban and agricultural areas in China,” the architects explained. “MFS IIIx3 offers an approach to and revives an ancient yet contemporary civilizational relationship with water, originally inspired by the water community of Makoko in Lagos, and now adapted for the water city of Chengdu.” + NLÉ Architects Images via NLÉ Architects

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Floating prefab architecture addresses climate change on Chengdus Jincheng Lake

Paris Officials Veto Herzog & de Meuron’s Triangle Skyscraper

November 20, 2014 by  
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Parisian city council officials have voted against Herzog & de Mueron ’s Tour Triangle, a proposed  triangular skyscraper  that would be the French capital’s third largest structure. Deeming the 180 meter tower too modern for the Parisian skyline, the city’s Mayor Anne Hidalgo says that the fight is not over, and is urging a second vote. Tour Triangle, which was first proposed in 2008, would create 3,000 jobs as well as 85,000 square meters of office space spread vertically . Read the rest of Paris Officials Veto Herzog & de Meuron’s Triangle Skyscraper Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: eco design , green design , Herzog & De Meuron , Mayor Anne Hidalgo , sustainable design , Tour Triangle , triangular architecture , triangular skyscraper

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Paris Officials Veto Herzog & de Meuron’s Triangle Skyscraper

Daniel Libeskind Design Wins Canadian National Holocaust Monument Competition

May 13, 2014 by  
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Team Lord of Toronto, which includes architect Daniel Libeskind , was just announced as the winner of the new Canadian National Holocaust Monument in Ottawa. Their proposal, entitled Landscape of Loss, Memory and Survival, was selected out of six finalists and is scheduled for inauguration in the Fall of 2015. Read the rest of Daniel Libeskind Design Wins Canadian National Holocaust Monument Competition Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: architecture competition , Canada architecture , Canadian National Holocaust Monument , Canadian War Museum , Daniel Libeskind Canada , Daniel Libeskind holocaust memorial , holocaust memorials , Holocaust Museum , memorials architecture , Ottawa architecture , starchitects , triangular architecture

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Daniel Libeskind Design Wins Canadian National Holocaust Monument Competition

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