Top gardening trends of 2020 and what to watch for 2021

November 3, 2020 by  
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Gardening is a hobby, craft and lifestyle that dates back thousands of years. Over that time, the act has taken on different forms and garnered wavering interest. What was once a mandatory way of life to provide food for the family transitioned into an option as global transportation and supermarkets took center stage in providing meals. But there’s something primal about gardening that makes it rewarding, whether that takes shape as growing your own food or simply cultivating a patio of natural decor from a combination of potted and planted foliage.  The coronavirus pandemic of 2020 has changed the way many of us spend our days. Having more time at home, voluntary or not, has encouraged bread baking, language learning, and even instrument playing. Additionally, there’s been a significant uptick in interest around all things gardening related. Google data reports a 39% increase from last year to this year on the topic — a good indicator of what’s on people’s minds. With this information, the experts at Love the Garden analyzed over 100 different garden-related hashtags on Instagram to uncover those growing in popularity and representing likely trends for 2021. Related: Make the most of your late summer garden with these tips Ten trends topped the list, with #balconygardening, #wildgarden and #insideoutside coming in for the top three. Balcony gardening offers a compact way to liven up a space or even grow food , so it makes sense as a popular topic, especially during lockdown. People used this hashtag 96,817 times, showing an international interest. Meanwhile, #wildgarden garnered 91,777 posts, indicating another popular gardening technique in the desire to not tame the wild. Unsurprisingly, #insideoutside saw 83,731 posts. After all, when it comes to plant life, a major goal is surrounding ourselves in nature. Think greenhouse living rooms on your back patio to bring this idea into perspective. Organize the couches and tables in a space with fresh air and naturally growing greenery to bring the indoors outdoors. The next most-populated hashtag was #tinygarden, with an impressive 80,752 posts. This trend illustrates how even urban locations and  tiny home  lots can use a small space to add natural appeal. In the middle of the top 10 was #raisedbedgarden (78,910), outlining ways areas with less-than-desirable soil conditions can still grow food and other greenery. In addition to what’s grown inside the raised beds, designing and building the beds is another hobby to tap into during social distancing.  The 76,576 posts related to #permaculturegarden prove that the design theory is alive and well. Permaculture gardening is a practice that takes into account all the features of the gardening system. It creates a permanent garden that respects the natural forces of wind, sun and  water . Basically, this approach centers holistic gardening and appears to be an ongoing trend to watch.  The number seven spot goes to #whitegarden with 51,750 posts. There’s something  minimalist  about an all-white space; a cleansing palette for the eyes and calming spot to relax. Color coordinating the garden space is not new and going classic with all-white blooms is still an obvious favorite.  Even smaller than the patio or remote section of the yard, using what’s available takes gardening indoors with #windowsillgarden, mentioned 48,432 times. After all, if you live in an apartment with no balcony, a sunny windowsill may be the only garden space up for offer. Especially during quarantine, finding any way to bring  green design  into your home not only sparks joy but also provides the added benefit of natural air filtration for cleaner air that is higher in oxygen and lower in carbon dioxide. Going back to color-themed gardens, #greygardens comes in ninth place with 45,124 mentions. Grey has sat at the top of the interior design color palette for the past decade so it’s not surprising gardeners want to keep the trend alive in outdoor spaces too. While most  plants  don’t fall into the grey category, furniture, stone walkways, water features and decking set a slate foundation for the surrounding landscape.  Finally, rounding out the top 10 most popular gardening related hashtags for 2020 is #cottagegardens at 37,021 posts. Again, this doesn’t seem too outlandish considering the ongoing love for cabins and tiny houses, which fit the cottage vibe. Even Victorian architecture or farmhouse structures can easily take on a cottagecore  interior design  style, so bringing those elements into the garden makes sense.  Having a vision of what piqued interest in 2020 serves as a solid indicator for what trends will continue into 2021, but the team at Love the Garden further took the guesswork out of what to expect by seeking out other popular gardening trends. The hashtags they analyzed covered the topics of Zen, urban, and container gardening and also focused on sustainability . The top 15 hashtags include #growyourown, #urbangarden, #organicgardening, #urbangardening, #vegetablegarden, #succulentgarden, #indoorgarden, #japanesegarden, #containergardening, #gardentotable, #verticalgarden, #outdoorkitchen, #countrygarden, #citygarden and #zengarden, proving that whatever type of gardening you’re considering, there’s a plant for that. + Love the Garden Images via Love the Garden and Pexels

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Top gardening trends of 2020 and what to watch for 2021

There’s a big appetite for farm-to-consumer shopping

August 21, 2020 by  
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There’s a big appetite for farm-to-consumer shopping Jim Giles Fri, 08/21/2020 – 01:45 Avrom Farm sits in the hills above Green Lake in central Wisconsin. With 5,000 chickens, 200 pigs and six acres of vegetables, it’s a minnow in an industry dominated by an increasingly small number of producers and processors.  In March, a stay-at-home order hit the region. In just a week, the restaurants the farm sold to shut up shop, and local farmers’ markets closed. That might have been the end for Avrom. But then something interesting happened. Owner Hayden Holbert cleared space in a corner of his barn and created a tiny fulfillment center, the back-end operation for an online store and delivery service that he had quickly set up. Then he added products from nearby farms to the site.  Soon his digital business outgrew the barn and had to be moved into a newly constructed hoop house. In a few weeks, business online had pretty much compensated for the losses from restaurants and markets. Now Holbert is raising money to outfit an even larger space nearby, complete with a retail store, which will allow him to sell direct to local people year round. Stories such as Holbert’s have popped up repeatedly in the five months since the coronavirus pandemic forced the United States into varying degrees of lockdown. “There’s been a big uptick in demand — probably 3X,” Joe Heitzeberg, CEO of Crowd Cow , which connects consumers with small producers, told me this week. The demand to buy direct from producers existed before COVID. Consumers like to connect directly with farmers and to feel more confident about what they’re buying. But a combination of broken supply chains, reluctance to visit supermarkets and more time spent cooking at home has accelerated this trend.   This won’t go away any time soon. It’s really entrenched. “The consumer during COVID has been willing to explore the fastest way to secure healthy, fresh food in their home,” said Anne Greven , head of food and ag innovation at Rabobank, which highlighted the rise of farm-to-consumer channels in its latest trends report . “This won’t go away any time soon. It’s really entrenched.” I get this. One of the delights of summer here in San Francisco is my local farmers market, where the peaches and plums and kale taste so much better than supermarket options, which often arrive via lengthy supply chains. It’s also great to see new ways for farms to prosper. Yet I think that we should be careful not to assume that farm-to-consumer channels are clearly better than alternatives.  Price is one issue. A whole organic free range chicken on Crowd Cow costs $5 per pound; the equivalent non-organic product in Safeway goes for $1.49 per pound. Don’t get me wrong: I know there are multiple good reasons for this difference, including animal welfare standards. My point isn’t to question the value of organic methods. I’m raising the issue of price to note that low-income families can’t necessarily participate in this trend. It goes back to something I raised a few weeks back in the context of race : We all agree that we need a better food system, but we don’t always ask for whom it’s better. (To be fair to Heitzeberg, he was well aware of this issue and said he was working hard to reduce the price of everyday essentials. Crowd Cow prices for some products, such as ground beef, come closer to those at Whole Foods and other premium supermarkets.)  There’s a second question about sustainability. How do you know your local small-scale producer has a lower environmental impact than a distant mega-farm? As I noted last week, our intuitions about the industrialization of food aren’t necessarily correct. We need to consider the amount of land required for production, the methods used on the farms and the transport costs. It’s a complicated comparison to make, and we urgently need more data to guide us. The good news is that progress is being made on both fronts. On the equity side, the pandemic has promoted companies and nonprofits to partner on projects that provide farm produce directly to food-insecure communities . Several research groups are looking at scale and sustainability in food systems, including one major think tank, whose report I hope to write about soon. I’ll close with an intriguing aside about Hayden Holbert and Avrom Farm. I came across his story via Steward, an investment platform that lets regular people — not just well-heeled, accredited investors — put money into sustainable agriculture projects. This means that you and anyone else can help Holbert build out his new business, and earn a projected 6 to 8 percent return in the process. (You know the drill: Projections are not guarantees of future results.) More details at Steward . This article was adapted from the GreenBiz Food Weekly newsletter. Sign up here to receive your own free subscription. Pull Quote This won’t go away any time soon. It’s really entrenched. Topics Food & Agriculture Social Justice Farmers Food & Agriculture Featured Column Foodstuff Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Avrom Farm owner Hayden Holbert cleared space in a corner of his barn and created a tiny fulfillment center, the back-end operation for an online store and delivery service. He quickly outgrew that space. Courtesy of Avrom Farm Close Authorship

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Ceres CEO and President Mindy Lubber on crossing the sustainability-investor chasm

February 29, 2020 by  
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2019 saw an unprecedented growth in interest in and consideration for ESG (environmental, social and governance) issues from companies, investors and now government, with the first congressional hearing on ESG issues in the United States held in July. This trend signals a growing recognition that climate change is not only detrimental to our environment, but also to our economic system, and that many issues that were once considered non-financial are now seen as financially material.

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Ceres CEO and President Mindy Lubber on crossing the sustainability-investor chasm

Trend: Carbon markets get real on removal

February 10, 2020 by  
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Planting and protecting forests in remote areas of the world may be challenging. But another trend may help matters.

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Trend: Carbon markets get real on removal

Forget moonshots — it’s time now for a global ‘soilshot’ to address climate change

September 6, 2019 by  
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Poor land use is increasing erosion, nutrient depletion and other threats. But sustainable practices and technologies can reverse this trend.

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Forget moonshots — it’s time now for a global ‘soilshot’ to address climate change

The Biggest Sustainability Trend for 2019 Will Be …

January 3, 2019 by  
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Well, readers, let me start out by saying I was … The post The Biggest Sustainability Trend for 2019 Will Be … appeared first on Earth911.com.

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The Biggest Sustainability Trend for 2019 Will Be …

Vegan Dining Trend Inspires Fresh Vocational Program

July 31, 2018 by  
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Some students training for work in the food industry want … The post Vegan Dining Trend Inspires Fresh Vocational Program appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Vegan Dining Trend Inspires Fresh Vocational Program

Plogging: Fitness Meets Environmentalism in This Hot Trend

May 28, 2018 by  
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In an effort to eliminate litter from public spaces and … The post Plogging: Fitness Meets Environmentalism in This Hot Trend appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Plogging: Fitness Meets Environmentalism in This Hot Trend

The Newest Eco Food Trend: Blended Burgers

April 12, 2018 by  
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Though many environmentalists understand that red meat isn’t always green, … The post The Newest Eco Food Trend: Blended Burgers appeared first on Earth911.com.

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The Newest Eco Food Trend: Blended Burgers

Predicting the Biggest Green Trend for 2018

December 29, 2017 by  
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Although Kermit the Frog once sang, “It’s not easy being … The post Predicting the Biggest Green Trend for 2018 appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Predicting the Biggest Green Trend for 2018

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