Art installation in Milan shows how much CO2 trees capture

November 22, 2021 by  
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Natural Capital is one of the largest data visualizations ever created, and it is suitably impressive. This installation has been erected in the famous historical botanical garden in Milan, the Orto Botanico di Brera. It shows exactly how plants absorb emissions in a way that’s beautiful, informative and poignant. Each tree species is matched with a sphere that shows how much CO2 the trees can capture and store. This installation is the result of a collaboration between design office Carol Ratti Associati (CRA) and energy company Eni. Natural Capital will examine the key role that trees play in creating oxygen and by showing how much CO2 each tree species can capture and store. The installation is spread out over 500 square meters of garden, a striking series of floating bubbles. Related: How many trees are needed to offset a city’s carbon emissions? Eni is committed to protecting forests as part of its decarbonization strategy. Each large globe showed exactly how much CO2 would be in the air if the trees weren’t here to collect it. You can visually see how much dangerous gas would be in the atmosphere for each and every single tree. It’s a lot to take in and that’s exactly what this installation is all about. The entrance to the garden has a giant sphere that’s right on the ground. This is the amount of CO2 that is produced, on average, by a human body every single year. Humans need nature and that’s why we must preserve nature. Together, CRA and Eni plan to explore circular economy and sustainability paradigms. This data visualization is an excellent reminder of how important forest ecosystems are. + Carlo Ratti Associati Photography by Marco Beck Peccoz

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Art installation in Milan shows how much CO2 trees capture

Los Angeles art show features historic Barnsdall olive wood

November 16, 2021 by  
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The Barnsdall Art Park in East Hollywood, California has spent its pandemic years getting a makeover. The park is known for its art center and the site of Hollyhock House, designed by famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright. But central to this urban oasis is a historic 463-tree olive grove. And now an innovative olive-wood themed art exhibit and online auction is raising money to plant an additional forty trees. The Barnsdall Olive Wood Workshop Exhibition and Online Auction opened November 13 for in-person viewing at the contemporary art gallery Luis De Jesus Los Angeles . Twenty-one well known local LA artists, architects, designers and landscape artists have their work in the show. All the pieces feature Barnsdall olive wood from a recent pruning. The online auction closes December 4. Related: LA’s Barnsdall Art Park revives historic olive grove The show’s mission is to improve the air quality of East Hollywood — piggybacking on L.A.’s Green New Deal, a sweeping initiative that includes planting 90,000 new trees — and to further beautify the grounds. Canadian immigrant and real estate broker Joseph H. Spires originally planted a commercial olive grove here in the 1890s. In 1919, he sold the property to oil heiress, philanthropist and art lover Aline Barnsdall. She hired Frank Lloyd Wright to build Hollyhock House, which became L.A.’s first UNESCO World Heritage Site. Inhabitat talked to two artists participating in the Barnsdall Olive Wood Workshop Exhibition and Online Auction: Sevag Pakradouni of Sev’s Wood Crafts and Kasey Toomey of landscape architecture design firm TERREMOTO . Here’s what they had to say about turning wood from historic trees into new works of art. Inhabitat:  How did you get involved with the Barnsdall Olive Wood show? Sev:  My daughter Katherine was the horticulturist and project manager for the recent Olive Grove Initiative which was created in partnership with the Barnsdall Art Park Foundation, the Department of Recreation and Parks and the Los Angeles Parks Foundation. One of the aspects of this initiative involved a horticultural survey of the grove’s existing olive trees and the careful pruning of 400 trees. When I heard that they were going to be pruning the olive trees, I immediately recommended that the wood be saved and utilized, rather than chipped or discarded.  Olivewood is a valuable wood, and one of my philosophies as a wood worker is to salvage and create functional art out of wood that might otherwise go to waste . We worked with the contractors who pruned the trees so that all pieces of wood two inches in diameter or greater were saved and safely stored to be made into future art that would benefit the Barnsdall Art Park Foundation’s goal to restore the grove . Even though some of the wood was still “green” and not yet workable, there were enough dried pieces to initiate this art project mere months after the grove was pruned. After the remainder of the wood cures, we will have even more to work with in years to come. Inhabitat: Tell us about the pieces you made for the show. Sev:  In my woodworking, I like to combine form with function, art with utility. When I thought of the era when this grove of olive trees became the foundation for the landscape of the Hollyhock House, I wanted my piece to harken back to that period of time in history, so I decided to use my piece of olivewood to make bases for lamps utilizing (now modern LED versions) Edison light bulbs. I let each piece of wood guide my hand to create what it would eventually become, so each lamp base has a different shape and feel from the other. Since Sev’s Wood Crafts is a family affair, my daughter utilized her selected piece of olivewood to create a pyrographic drawing entitled Sentinel . She cut and arranged the wood to form her canvas and then burned her designs into the wood freehand.  She never knows what her designs will be in advance, but allows the wood and her instincts to guide the process.  Olivewood is easy to burn and provides a good contrast, as it is light in color and relatively uniformly textured. Toomey: We selected the most gnarly piece of olive wood we could find, and our creative process started from there. We riffed on the hollyhock/spine motif found throughout the Hollyhock House, specifically the Hollyhock House chairs. We repositioned the olive wood branch as the spine for our stool seat as a direct reference to the olive grove. Also, we utilized wood offcuts from the detritus of our creative practice, highlighted by the red painted board end of the fir that was slapped on at the milling yard. As environmentally-conscious designers and artists, we work hard to use everything with love and care and often are most inspired by what’s left behind. We aim to create environments and objects that are aesthetically, ecologically and metaphysically provocative and productive. Inhabitat:  Have you worked with olive wood before? How is it different from other woods? Sev:  I’ve worked with olivewood before and have always liked its character in finished products. I’ve made vases, bottle stoppers, pens, belaying pins, hair forks and other items, and it never ceases to amaze me. It takes a natural high luster and is highly prized for its dense, intricate grain pattern when the wood is particularly old.  Fun fact: our cats seem to react to the smell of the wood as they do to catnip. If I have shavings on my shoes or olivewood in the house, it isn’t long before they’ve taken notice.  It’s not always easy to find large pieces of olivewood, so I often try to use whatever I can find from trimmings and cast-offs that are considered “leftovers” from other wood workers or carpenters. I can’t abide waste, so I will work with pieces small enough to make a simple hair stick or wooden pendant that my daughter burns with a design in order to maximize its use. Our backyard is a testament to my inability to see wood go to waste, as we have piles of wood we’ve salvaged from the neighborhood, whether it’s a 60-year-old apricot tree the neighbor just cut down, or chunks of miscellaneous wood I’ve intercepted on its way to the chipper. Toomey:  We hadn’t worked with olive wood as a material before, but we have planted many olive trees in our landscape practice. We chose to not manipulate or mill the olive branch into wood. Instead, to honor its natural form, we kept it as is.  Inhabitat:  How do you feel about the Barnsdall olive trees? Sev:  The most exciting olive trees in the grove are the oldest trees. There are 46 of the 463 trees in the grove which are 130 years old and original to the grove prior to the Hollyhock House being built. The wood that comes from the gnarled branches or stumps of one of those older trees has some of the most unique and beautiful character inside. To see a stump remaining from one of those older trees and to know that its demise years ago was treated like the demise of any other dead city tree — meaning it was chipped into mulch and processed as green waste — causes me physical pain to think about.   Toomey:  While they are a remnant of a more agrarian past, nonetheless they remain and persist — offering habitat , shade and food for birds, insects and humans. The integration of the existing olive grove into the Barnsdall landscape design by Frank Lloyd Wright is analogous to our entire design ethos where landscapes are curated amalgamations of place — the past, present and future. Images via Sevag Pakradouni and Kasey Toomey

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Pool house uses traditional Spain "pedra en sec" design

November 10, 2021 by  
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Casa Fly is a home that mirrors the surrounding Mallorca, Spain landscape and culture. Finished in 2020, it offers expansive views embracing quintessential small coastal town appeal.  Designed by beef architekti studio, the planning began with a reflection of traditional building techniques in the area, specifically the act of dry stone stacking known as pedra en sec. The process is seen throughout the surrounding area for fencing and retaining walls, and the stones used are sourced from a local quarry. It’s so distinctive, the process was declared as an intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity by UNESCO in 2018. Related: Greenary is a lush, biophilic house built around a tree In addition to the visual appeal, the pedra en sec is a natural stone material . Additionally, it provides passive cooling in the summer and retains heat in the winter.  The house is also equipped with several passive design features for natural ventilation, including skylights that open and windows placed for optimal cross ventilation and natural light . Windows allow shading from the concrete slabs surrounding them. The eye-catching wooden shutters across the windows fold for easy opening and closing, and further control heat and light.  For the interior design , the team selected a neutral background across the space, placing the emphasis on the custom-made furnishings. They relied heavily on wood, local stone and concrete throughout the space. They accented using wooden lamelas adjacent to the staircase, handmade ceramic pendant lights above the dining table and an abstract bronze angel in the entrance hall. As further evidence of passive design , the home has a complete focus on the surrounding landscape. The lower level pulls the eyes across the trees and toward the ocean, while the upper level directs the gaze into the nearby city. An infinity pool in the backyard allows for a soak in the water beneath the stars or afternoon sun. + beef architekti Photography by Tomeu Canyellas

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6 things to do with your fall leaves

October 26, 2021 by  
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‘Tis the season of colorful landscapes, on the trees and on the ground. While you may have a native hillside that flows through the cycles of the seasons without intervention, if you have a lawn with trees, the season equates to clean up time to avoid patchy grass caused by wet, matted leaves when spring rolls around. Although removing leaves is a part of autumn chores, you can choose to send them straight to the yard debris cart, bag them up for waste removal or give the leaves a second life around your home. Here are some inspiring ways to make the most of this fall’s natural material. Compost If you don’t already have a compost pile, fall is the perfect time to start. You don’t need to have a fancy compost bin, although it can harness the contents and increase efficiency. The process works naturally even if all you do is throw compost layers in the corner of the yard. Just remember it will break down best with thin layers of different kinds of materials. Include green layers such as grass clipping and organic material from the kitchen like vegetable peelings and wilted lettuce .  Related: 12 things you should never compost Mulching Trees store much of their nutrient base in their leaves. By using your leaves as a mulch, those nutrients transfer to the soil and other plants , contributing to the cycle of nature. Instead of using large leaves, chop them smaller by using the mulch setting on your lawn mower. Simply “leaf” them on the ground and drive over them with the mower set a few inches above the ground. If the leaves are finely mulched, you can leave them on the grass as an additive for the growth period in the spring. However, any clumps of leaves will result in bald spots so make sure the mulch is lightly applied.  Leaf mulch can also be used to amend the soil in your garden beds. Apply it along with any fall fertilizers to balance out the nutrients. This will attract earthworms who will do the rest of the work in breaking down the materials into a rich soil for next season.  Also, apply leaf mulch to flower beds. This natural layer helps moderate ground temperature and water absorption. Plus, they do a great job of suppressing weed growth. Again, it’s best to run large leaves through a mulcher first. Use the leaf mulch around trees, berries, flowers, shrubs and other plants.  Thanksgiving table décor Bringing the outdoors in is a quintessential part of the Thanksgiving tradition. Make a centerpiece with a carved out gourd or pumpkin as a candle holder and surround it with colorful dried leaves. Use more dried leaves to make placemats for family and guests. Simply cut a rectangle of clear shelf liner and press leaves onto the sticky side. Add names, kids’ handprints cut out of paper, stickers or other decorations and then cover with a top sheet, pressing the two pieces together. You can also have the kids help make place markers by writing guests names on dried leaves.  Another option for the centerpiece is to decoupage leaves to the outside of a canning jar. Adorn it with a ribbon made from a natural material like jute and place a candle inside.   Wreaths Leaves are easy to source and easy to use for DIY wreath making. Create a circular wreath made entirely of leaves by feeding a needle with thread through the center of dozens of mostly-dried leaves. Once you’ve completed a long strand, use wire or rope to attach it to a wire wreath form.  For a different look, use large or small leaves to design a wreath by laying them flat on the form. Overlap the leaves as you work around the circle . Then adorn the leaf base with burlap ribbon, dried berries or other natural materials.  Make a banner Dried leaves can be decorated any number of ways with markers, paints or layers of natural color from other leaves. Have a leaf-decorating party and display your fanciful creation by attaching them to a piece of rope with clothespins. Hang your dangling creation across the mantle or above the dining table.  You can also make a banner by cutting felt pieces into banner shapes or simply using fall-colored paper . To each piece attach pinecones, leaves, twigs and acorns into the shape of letters, with the final banner spelling out “Thanks” or “Thanksgiving.” Attach the pieces together by punching holes in the top to feed through rope or yarn.  Stuff a scarecrow The outdoors might need a little seasonal attention too. Keep the leaves close to their source and spook away the wildlife with a scarecrow in your yard. Once you have the basic design in place, stuff your scarecrow’s clothing with copious amounts of leaves until you achieve the bulk you’re looking for. Top it with a burlap sack or paper bag, also stuffed with leaves, for the head.  Via DoItYourself , The Old Farmer’s Almanac , The Spruce   Images via Pexels

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6 things to do with your fall leaves

A green remodel gave this 1950s home major treehouse vibes

September 13, 2021 by  
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Your home might be cozy, but nothing compares to the fun of a childhood treehouse . Hazel Road Residence combines modern home design with treehouse vibes to showcase the best of both worlds. Completed by Oakland -based firm Buttrick Projects Architecture+Design, this project transformed a 1950s residence into a gorgeous family home with sustainable features. Located in Berkeley, California , this house began its life in 1952 as a 1,714-square-foot structure. Bringing the home’s “good bones” into the modern era took thoughtful planning. Buttrick Projects Architecture+Design started the transformation with a kitchen remodel in 2012. Warm wood cabinets echo the trees outdoors, while steel appliances keep the kitchen looking modern and fresh. This remodel also laid the groundwork for an upstairs addition, completed with the help of IDA Structural Engineers and Jetton Construction, Inc. The project was completed in 2018. Related: Residential building from the ’60s gets an energy-efficient remodel Now a 2,392-square-foot home, Hazel Road can comfortably house a family with kids. But more space isn’t the only welcoming element to the updated house. As stated in a project description, a “unifying concept to the project was to use the yard to greater effect.” This is where Hazel Road’s “tree-house feel” comes into play. The green yard features inviting wood and concrete stairs leading up to a deck shaded by a gorgeous Magnolia tree. Flush sliders added to the family room/kitchen blur the barrier between indoor and outdoor spaces . Continuing to bring the outdoors in, windows throughout the home frame views of the tree. This includes the upstairs master bedroom’s full-wall sliding windows with an ‘invisible’ glass safety rail. Sustainability features reinforce the home’s green perspective. For example, spray foam insulation and energy-efficient LED lighting were used throughout the structure. Exterior shades and deep overhangs control both glare and western light to minimize solar gain. The residence also includes a “state of the art rainscreen wall” with cementitious panel siding. + Buttrick Projects Architecture+Design Photography by Cesar Rubio, Matthew Millman and Buttrick Projects A+D

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A green remodel gave this 1950s home major treehouse vibes

Greening the board game industry with Big Potato Games

September 7, 2021 by  
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Party games can be a fun reason for everyone to get together, but they can also take a lot of resources to make. Big Potato takes a sustainable approach to make game time a little greener. You may have seen Big Potato games in the past. The company is responsible for titles such as Herd Mentality, Mean Girls the Party Game and The Chameleon. These games are available at major retailers all over the U.S., including Target. Big Potato gets ideas from everywhere for their games. People from game designers to everyday gamers have submitted game ideas. Related: Indie comic book characters are brought to life as unique cardboard cutouts While focusing on games that are easy to play and understand, Big Potato takes a sustainable approach to improve the planet with each game it makes. The company works with the Eden Reforestation Project and Ecologi to plant a tree for every game sold. It’s their “one game, one tree” commitment. Through this initiative, Big Potato is planting mangrove trees in Madagascar and working toward reforestation in Mozambique and Kenya. Almost 900 trees have already been planted. But wait, there’s more. Big Potato has cut back on excess packaging and transportation, streamlining its manufacturing and shipping practices. The games are put in the smallest possible boxes to reduce the space taken up inside the truck, meaning more items can ship at once. This helps lower the transportation pollution involved in shipping the games. Big Potato is also looking for ways to cut back on plastic. The company has committed to making 64% of its games being plastic -free by the end of 2021. This goal will be achieved by targeting the plastic waste commonly associated with boxed games, such as shrink wrap around the boxes and game cards and plastic box inserts inside the game. Instead, cellulose stickers will secure the boxes, and recyclable paper bands will keep the game cards in place. + Big Potato Games Images via Big Potato Games

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Greening the board game industry with Big Potato Games

Trees face extinction, too. What can we do about it?

September 3, 2021 by  
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What provides habitat for half the world’s known plants and animals, is a vital component of  biodiversity  and an important economic crop? If you guessed trees, you have an inkling of their importance in the world — and will be horrified that a new study says many tree species are at risk of extinction. Botanic Gardens Conservation International (BGCI) released its  State of the World’s Trees report  on Wednesday. And like much news these days, it’s grim reading. The U.K.-based conservation group deduced that 17,500 types of trees face possible  extinction . That’s about 30% of Earth’s tree species. Already, 440 species don’t even have 50 individuals left growing wild. And 142 or more are now extinct in their natural habitats. Related: LA’s Barnsdall Art Park revives historic olive grove “This report is a wake-up call to everyone around the world that  trees  need help,” BGCI secretary general Paul Smith said in a  statement . “Every tree species matters—to the millions of other species that depend on trees, and to people all over the world,” he said. “For the first time… we can pinpoint exactly which tree species need our help, so policymakers and conservation experts can deploy the resources and expertise needed to prevent future extinctions.” Logging, invasive pests, disease, forest clearance and other types of habitat loss all threaten tree species. Nor is climate change helping. The most tree diversity is found in hotter places, as is the most danger to those trees. Central and South America lead in number of tree species, followed by tropical parts of Southeast Asia and Africa.  Madagascar  — with 1,842 threatened tree species — is the single country with the most endangered trees. Brazil and Indonesia follow, with 1,788 and 1,306 threatened species respectively. More temperate areas of Europe, North America and Asia have both less tree diversity and fewer species threatened by extinction. The report recommends actions to help trees, including forming a new global coalition to radically scale up tree  conservation , better dissemination of research on the conservation of tree species, better monitoring and making sure that threatened species are saved in seed banks. Tree conservation also needs more funding and better data collection, according to the report. Via Common Dreams Lead image via Pexels

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How many trees are needed to offset a city’s carbon emissions?

August 26, 2021 by  
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Trees are nature’s lungs. While we enjoy their beauty, shade and fruits of their existence, they are silently working to clean the air. The natural process of all plants taking in carbon and releasing oxygen not only gives us clean air to breathe but also stores carbon that otherwise contributes to global warming . Countries around the world are in a race to find solutions for these types of greenhouse gases, which are a result of human activities like driving cars and manufacturing goods. While the push for electric vehicles and renewable energy through  solar panels , wind power and hydroelectricity takes the spotlight, another part of the solution equation is growing all around us in the form of trees. Related: Three Americans’ lifetime emissions enough to kill one person The simple fact is, planting trees is an exceptional tool in the fight against climate change. With this in mind,  Compare The Market  has presented its most recent research on the number of trees capital cities around the world would need to plant annually to offset the carbon emissions they contribute to the atmosphere. The study is based on information available through the Global Carbon Atlas Global City Emissions dataset, which measures emissions levels. While major cities work to reverse, slow down and stop the creation of these carbon emissions, what is the estimated number of trees it would take to counterbalance them? Which countries are the highest contributors and which have the lowest  environmental  impact? According to the data, Asia has some work to do. Five of the ten top carbon-emitting capital cities are in Asia. Note that for comparative purposes, the dataset measures transport, industrial,  waste  and local power plants emissions within city boundaries. The report combined data to show the total amount of carbon produced alongside the number of trees it would take to offset it. For example, the five cities in Asia, which include Beijing, Singapore, Hong Kong, Tokyo and Seoul, release a combined 219,506,539 tCO2 annually. The cities would have to plant 43,901,308 trees each year to offset those emissions. Individually, Beijing would need to plant 15,020,976 trees, followed by Singapore with 9,366,336 and Hong Kong with 8,975,292. Tokyo needs a 5,522,200-plant offset and Seoul 5,016,504. Other cities in the top 10 were Istanbul, Lagos, Santiago, London and Mexico City.  An energy spokesperson at Compare The Market comments, “Becoming carbon neutral is an essential goal for countries around the world, and as pledges roll in to reach this target by 2050 and beyond, immediate action is needed. One way we have studied is to offset emissions by planting trees which is great for absorbing CO2, with added benefits of supporting the ecosystem and  wildlife .” The tree offset calculation is based on information sourced from Carbonify.com’s carbon dioxide emissions calculator. The estimates are based on the assumption that five  trees  planted can clean up each ton of carbon dioxide produced.  The study stated, “A tree planted in the humid tropics absorbs on average 50 pounds (22 kg) of carbon dioxide annually over 40 years – each tree will absorb 1 ton of CO2 over its lifetime; but as trees grow, they compete for resources and some may die or be destroyed – not all will achieve their full carbon sequestration potential.” On the other end of the data spectrum are the countries performing better in the battle of low carbon emissions. For these results, a few substitutions were made in the face of missing data. Toronto, Milan and Basel were substituted to include Canada, Italy and Switzerland in the study. Reykjavik, Iceland was the least carbon-emitting capital in the study with total emissions of 346,630 tCO2 per year. The city would still have some work to do, planting 69,326 trees annually to offset its footprint. Of all the cities in the study, Reykjavik was the only one to come in below the 500,000 tCO2-produced mark. Even though nearly 70,000 is still a lot of trees, it was also the only city to have an estimate below 100,000 trees per year to offset carbon emissions. New Zealand took second place for carbon control with annual emissions of 621,179 tCO2. For Wellington to neutralize this, it will have to plant 124,236 trees a year. Basel, Switzerland, had the third-lowest number to plant at 156,786 trees to offset its 783,932 tCO2 footprint. Every other city in the study came in at over 200,000 trees a year. The study provides one tool in an array of options to reduce carbon release. Planting trees alone isn’t a sustainable solution, but neither is focusing solely on renewable energy or  recycling . To achieve goals set by world leaders, it will take a combination of actions across a range of environmental fields.  “The number of trees required may seem very high in cities like Beijing which would need to plant over 15 million trees, but this is if we only used plant power alone. There are many other initiatives and technologies in place, like the government incentives, which present lots of opportunities to offset carbon emissions on a small and large scale,” the spokesman said. + Compare The Market Images via Pixabay

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How many trees are needed to offset a city’s carbon emissions?

How many trees are needed to offset a city’s carbon emissions?

August 26, 2021 by  
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Trees are nature’s lungs. While we enjoy their beauty, shade and fruits of their existence, they are silently working to clean the air. The natural process of all plants taking in carbon and releasing oxygen not only gives us clean air to breathe but also stores carbon that otherwise contributes to global warming . Countries around the world are in a race to find solutions for these types of greenhouse gases, which are a result of human activities like driving cars and manufacturing goods. While the push for electric vehicles and renewable energy through  solar panels , wind power and hydroelectricity takes the spotlight, another part of the solution equation is growing all around us in the form of trees. Related: Three Americans’ lifetime emissions enough to kill one person The simple fact is, planting trees is an exceptional tool in the fight against climate change. With this in mind,  Compare The Market  has presented its most recent research on the number of trees capital cities around the world would need to plant annually to offset the carbon emissions they contribute to the atmosphere. The study is based on information available through the Global Carbon Atlas Global City Emissions dataset, which measures emissions levels. While major cities work to reverse, slow down and stop the creation of these carbon emissions, what is the estimated number of trees it would take to counterbalance them? Which countries are the highest contributors and which have the lowest  environmental  impact? According to the data, Asia has some work to do. Five of the ten top carbon-emitting capital cities are in Asia. Note that for comparative purposes, the dataset measures transport, industrial,  waste  and local power plants emissions within city boundaries. The report combined data to show the total amount of carbon produced alongside the number of trees it would take to offset it. For example, the five cities in Asia, which include Beijing, Singapore, Hong Kong, Tokyo and Seoul, release a combined 219,506,539 tCO2 annually. The cities would have to plant 43,901,308 trees each year to offset those emissions. Individually, Beijing would need to plant 15,020,976 trees, followed by Singapore with 9,366,336 and Hong Kong with 8,975,292. Tokyo needs a 5,522,200-plant offset and Seoul 5,016,504. Other cities in the top 10 were Istanbul, Lagos, Santiago, London and Mexico City.  An energy spokesperson at Compare The Market comments, “Becoming carbon neutral is an essential goal for countries around the world, and as pledges roll in to reach this target by 2050 and beyond, immediate action is needed. One way we have studied is to offset emissions by planting trees which is great for absorbing CO2, with added benefits of supporting the ecosystem and  wildlife .” The tree offset calculation is based on information sourced from Carbonify.com’s carbon dioxide emissions calculator. The estimates are based on the assumption that five  trees  planted can clean up each ton of carbon dioxide produced.  The study stated, “A tree planted in the humid tropics absorbs on average 50 pounds (22 kg) of carbon dioxide annually over 40 years – each tree will absorb 1 ton of CO2 over its lifetime; but as trees grow, they compete for resources and some may die or be destroyed – not all will achieve their full carbon sequestration potential.” On the other end of the data spectrum are the countries performing better in the battle of low carbon emissions. For these results, a few substitutions were made in the face of missing data. Toronto, Milan and Basel were substituted to include Canada, Italy and Switzerland in the study. Reykjavik, Iceland was the least carbon-emitting capital in the study with total emissions of 346,630 tCO2 per year. The city would still have some work to do, planting 69,326 trees annually to offset its footprint. Of all the cities in the study, Reykjavik was the only one to come in below the 500,000 tCO2-produced mark. Even though nearly 70,000 is still a lot of trees, it was also the only city to have an estimate below 100,000 trees per year to offset carbon emissions. New Zealand took second place for carbon control with annual emissions of 621,179 tCO2. For Wellington to neutralize this, it will have to plant 124,236 trees a year. Basel, Switzerland, had the third-lowest number to plant at 156,786 trees to offset its 783,932 tCO2 footprint. Every other city in the study came in at over 200,000 trees a year. The study provides one tool in an array of options to reduce carbon release. Planting trees alone isn’t a sustainable solution, but neither is focusing solely on renewable energy or  recycling . To achieve goals set by world leaders, it will take a combination of actions across a range of environmental fields.  “The number of trees required may seem very high in cities like Beijing which would need to plant over 15 million trees, but this is if we only used plant power alone. There are many other initiatives and technologies in place, like the government incentives, which present lots of opportunities to offset carbon emissions on a small and large scale,” the spokesman said. + Compare The Market Images via Pixabay

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How many trees are needed to offset a city’s carbon emissions?

Earth911 Quiz #94: Climate Change, Trees, & Carbon Sequestration

August 26, 2021 by  
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The U.N. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s sixth report on the state of the global… The post Earth911 Quiz #94: Climate Change, Trees, & Carbon Sequestration appeared first on Earth911.

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Earth911 Quiz #94: Climate Change, Trees, & Carbon Sequestration

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