The Origin Treehouse has an amazing interior that will blow your mind

January 19, 2018 by  
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Paris-based firm Atelier LAVIT just unveiled a beautiful treehouse with a surprisingly sophisticated twist. The octagon-shaped Origin Treehouse wraps around a hundred-year-old oak in a lush canopy of treetops. While some treehouse designers take a more rustic approach to their interiors, the French architects went another route, creating a living space that provides hotel-like comfort – and it even features a heated spa and lounge area. The Origin Treehouse consists of two structure: a platform with a heated spa and a lounge area that sits on a lower level. The second structure is a soaring “birds nest” that’s hidden by the lush foliage. High up in the trees, the 250-square-foot treehouse is accessed via a suspended walkway from the first platform. Related: Microsoft unveils amazing treehouse office where employees can brainstorm in fresh air Two large sliding glass doors open up to the living space, whose sophisticated design is certainly unique in the world of treehouses. The interior was based on the principles of hotel design: it’s simple, elegant and clutter-free. The interior walls are lined with light poplar panels, giving the space a clean, bright feel. Just past the living space lies a small sitting area, a bedroom, the bathroom, and a technical closet. The octagonal shape of the treehouse allowed the architects to install plenty of large windows, which flood the interior with natural light. Those wanting to get even closer to nature can take a wooden ladder from the back deck to a stunning rooftop terrace that provides panoramic views of the forest. According to the architects, the cabin’s unique design was meant to blend into the serene forestscape: “Origin Tree House discreetly stands out among the centenarian oaks of the Château de Raray forest, as if it had always been part of the scenery. Majestic and elegant, it integrates and completes an already impressive landscape, sublimating it by offering a shelter.” + Atelier LAVIT Via Contemporist Photography by Marco Lavit Nicora

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The Origin Treehouse has an amazing interior that will blow your mind

The worlds first ski-in/ski-out treehouse cabins open in Montana

January 8, 2018 by  
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As brutal weather continues to unload icy fury in the northeast, those looking to carve white powder in the Midwest may want to head to the world’s first ski-in/ski-out treehouses . Located in the winter wonderland that is Whitefish Mountain Resort, the newly opened Snow Bear Chalets let you ski straight up to the front doors, which are located 30 feet off the ground. The resort offers three magical treehouse chalets located on the Whitefish Mountain Ski Resort’s Hope Slope. The wooden structures are built 30 feet above the forest and offer stunning views of Glacier National Park. The ski-in/ski-out cabin are the first of their kind – and they’re the only lodgings located directly on the ski run just few steps from the ski lift. When ready to hit the slopes, guests can hop straight onto the white powder. When there’s no snow, nature lovers can get their fix either hiking or biking the mountain’s hundreds of miles of trails. Related: Green-roofed 2022 Winter Olympic center echoes the surrounding ski slopes The cabins offer the ultimate in a luxury hygge-filled getaway . Guests can spend days filled with downhill skiing in one of the most picturesque ski areas in the world, and nights by the fire with a steaming cup of hot chocolate. The treehouses offer extremely cozy interiors with fireplaces, large kitchens and large windows to enjoy the stunning views. The three cabins range in sizes, but are all equipped with large treetop decks and outdoor hot tubs, along with various luxurious features. And if you’re into stargazing, the cabins even come with turrets and ceilings covered in constellations made up of 600 fiber-optic stars. + Snow Bear Chalets Via Curbed Photography via Snow Bear Chalets

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The worlds first ski-in/ski-out treehouse cabins open in Montana

Lightweight suspended tree tent can hold a whopping 700 pounds

December 27, 2017 by  
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For campers who are sick of lugging around bulky old-fashioned tents, the Tentnest is a breath of fresh air. Part hammock and part tent, the lightweight system fits easily in a backpack and can be set up anywhere in just 15 minutes. Even though it is suspended off the ground, the Tentnest is quite sturdy and can withstand some serious weight – more than 700 pounds. The Tentnest, which recently completed a successful Kickstarter campaign, was designed to streamline the adventure process. Thanks to its easy-to-hang system , the tent can be set up in just minutes in virtually any landscape. The only thing it needs is three trees or connection spots for the straps. It’s also very spacious and can sleep a family of three, two full-size adults and a child. Related: This hybrid hammock tent lets you float between the trees The suspended system avoids that bothersome feeling of sleeping on rocks or hard land. And since it’s off the ground, there’s no creepy crawlies around to bite you. It’s also 100% waterproof with zippered entrances, so if you find yourself in the middle of a rain or snow storm, Tentnest has got you covered, literally. + Tentnest Kickstarter

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Lightweight suspended tree tent can hold a whopping 700 pounds

How the world’s first floating city could restore the environment

December 27, 2017 by  
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The world got a little closer to the first floating city when the Seasteading Institute signed a memorandum of understanding with the French Polynesian government earlier this year. Not only could floating cities offer a sustainable place to live, but they could also potentially help coral reefs recover and provide a habitat for marine life, according to Joe Quirk, Blue Frontiers co-founder and Seasteading Institute seavangelist. Inhabitat spoke with Quirk and architect Simon Nummy to learn more about the vision for the world’s first floating city. Quirk told Inhabitat, “We think of cities as being a blight on the land and polluting the oceans. Floating cities are so different because they could actually be environmentally restorative.” For example, an increase in ocean temperatures has caused much of coral bleaching . Quirk said the mere presence of a floating city could help combat this issue. He said, “The corals could actually recover if we could just lower the temperature a little. Our engineers at Blue Frontiers have devised a plan to position the platforms to create some shadows to lower the temperatures. So as the sun moves about, you get enough light on the ocean floor to spark photosynthesis, but you lower the heat just enough to have a restorative effect.” Related: World’s first floating city one step closer to reality in French Polynesia Solid floating structures can also increase the amount of sea life by serving as a habitat, according to Quirk. He said platform floors, that would be below water level, could be made of glass, creating an aquarium apartment or aquarium restaurant. There are currently a few visions for what the floating cities might look like from different designers, as seen in the images. Nummy, who won the Seasteading Institute’s Architectural Design Contest, told Inhabitat, “The intent is for an architecture derived from nautical technology and sensibility, combined with a deep respect and willingness to learn from the culture and knowledge of the original seasteaders, the Polynesians.” The goal is for the floating city, which will be placed around one kilometer, or a little over half a mile, from shore inside a protected lagoon, to be 100 percent renewable and 100 percent self-sufficient. Floating solar panels could help power the city, and Quirk said as water cools panels, they could generate 20 percent more energy than their landlocked cousins. 20 percent of the floating city could be comprised of solar panels. Another goal is to not discharge any water into the lagoon – waste water is to be treated and recycled. Food could be cultivated in sea farming systems. “Each building strives for energy independence and the architecture results from this; energy efficiency and passive strategies are vital,” Nummy told Inhabitat. “Polynesian architecture is primarily about the roof and we have tried to interpret this in a contemporary, sensitive way that both reflects local precedents while harvesting rainwater and discretely maximizing the opportunities for photovoltaics and vertical axis wind turbines .” The floating city could be designed to look like a natural island, featuring green roofs and buildings constructed with locally-sourced materials – potentially bamboo, coconut fiber, or local wood like teak. Nummy told Inhabitat, “The buildings are designed to connect to nature and embrace the magnificent Tahitian views. Walls are to be louvred or openable whenever possible.” 2020 is the goal for construction of the floating village, which would include around 15 islands 82 by 82 feet. Quirk said the first floating city could be kind of like the first iPhone – rather bulky and expensive – but they aim to drive down the price with later iterations. Two to three years after 2020, they hope to double the amount of platforms – from around 15 to around 30 – and then triple the amount two to three years after that. Quirk said, “Island nations and coastal nations are already suffering from sea level rise , and this is a realistic way for them to adapt.” + Seasteading Institute + Blue Frontiers + Blue21 Images courtesy of Blue Frontiers, Blue21, and Simon Nummy

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How the world’s first floating city could restore the environment

BIG and WeWork reveal plans for interactive WeGrow kindergarten in New York City

November 29, 2017 by  
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International startup WeWork is expanding beyond its co-working roots with a public  kindergarten in New York City called WeGrow. The innovative school will be designed in collaboration  BIG Architects  and will provide an environment for education in an interactive space that focuses on introspection, exploration, and discovery. WeGrow will be a public elementary school for kids ages three to nine that aims to function as an environment where youngsters can experience hands-on and experiential learning. The first images of the space show wooden play areas, large grey pods for climbing and sitting, and several modular classrooms and treehouses that facilitate interaction. Related: 10 brilliant communal designs helping people work and live together WeWork claims that the new kindergarten will “focus as much on the growth of our children’s spirits as we will their minds.” References to various natural phenomena, as well as an element of futurism, permeate the new WeGrow concept, set to open its first location in Chelsea next autumn. “The design starts from the premise of a school universe at the level of the child: a field of super-elliptic objects forms a learning landscape that’s dense and rational – yet free and fluid,” said the firm. + BIG Architects Via Dezeen

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BIG and WeWork reveal plans for interactive WeGrow kindergarten in New York City

Antony Gibbons modern Trine treehouse is a tranquil nature retreat

September 15, 2017 by  
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Designer Antony Gibbon merges natural materials with modern design in his latest tree house design—the Trine house. Completed as part of his Roost treehouse series, this freestanding cluster of bulbous buildings forms a triangular formation elevated into the forest canopy. Slatted timber surrounds the living spaces to allow for light and views, creating an immersive experience in nature. The proposed Trine house comprises four elevated pod-like spaces that bear resemblance to budding flowers with long stems. The treehouses are accessed from the forest floor via a winding staircase in the central pod building that serves as an outdoor room and viewing tower. Three treehouses branch out of the main pod and are connected with canopy walkways. Related: Antony Gibbon unveils a new light-filled treehouse designed for the ground The triangular formation of the Trine house “distributes the support across all of the structures creating a sound and stable frame when high up in the elements,” wrote Gibbon. “The tree houses are accessed through the central staircase building which follows the form of the tree houses. The slatted wood design created a semi transparency to the building allowing the light and wind to pass through it.” The three peripheral treehouse pods contain a large open-plan living area with floor-to-ceiling windows, a bathroom on the lower floor, and an accessible top deck. Water pipes and wiring for energy needs would be installed through the supporting treehouse stems. You can explore more of Antony Gibbon’s work on his website and on Instagram . + Antony Gibbon Designs Images via Antony Gibbon Designs

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Antony Gibbons modern Trine treehouse is a tranquil nature retreat

Luxury Tree Villa communes with breathtaking nature in India

August 16, 2017 by  
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A picture-perfect getaway roosts in the treetops of west India. Architecture BRIO completed the Tree Villa, a two-story luxury getaway on the cliff of a 160-acre “treesort.” Set within the rich river landscape of Tala near the Kuda caves, the treehouse -like glass dwelling offers an immersive experience within a forested tropical setting. Architecture BRIO built the Tree Villa around existing mature trees, which grow up and through the roof, deck, and fencing, and give the structure its treehouse-like appearance. The dwelling blends into its surroundings with its thatched roof , predominately timber palette, and clean modern design. The architects wrapped the elevated Tree Villa in full-height glazing to optimize views of Tala’s stunning scenery. Tie-dyed bordered sheer curtains filter harsh sunlight during the day. The Tree Villa accommodates four adults and two children. The elevated ground floor is surrounded by an expansive timber deck and comprises a large luxurious bedroom, bathroom with mirrored slats, and a spiral staircase to the upper floor. The larger upper level also features a large timber deck in addition to a second bedroom, loft bed for children, living area, kitchen, dining room, west-facing patio, and a semi-outdoor bathroom that’s dramatically pierced by the enormous brand of an old Garuga fruit tree. The modern and minimalist open-plan interior and lack of walls reinforces the immersive experience in nature. Related: Bamboo-Veiled Dormitory by Architecture BRIO The architects write: “The volumetric compositions of partly white, partly reflective and transparent surfaces within a wooden framework animate and lighten up the space. It questions conventional definitions of exterior and interior and reinterprets notions of privacy and exposure within a hospitality environment. The spatial composition in an otherwise traditional tropical roof structure lends a sense of softness, sensuality, intimacy and complexity, making it a perfect setting for a retreat into the wilderness of Tala.” + Architecture BRIO Via ArchDaily Images © Photographix

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Luxury Tree Villa communes with breathtaking nature in India

Celebrate the magic of silence in this enchanting sound-proof treehouse

July 25, 2017 by  
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Visitors to the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew can now celebrate the sound of silence in the park’s amazing new Quiet Treehouse. Also referred to as the Woodland House, the eco-friendly, sound-insulated treehouse was designed by Quiet Mark to highlight the many health benefits of noise reduction in our daily lives. Developed in partnership with UK retail chain John Lewis, Quiet Mark created the cool, sound-proof structure as part of their company campaign, which promotes the reduction of noise levels in urban and rural settings. Recently unveiled in the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew as part of its annual summer festival, the treehouse is located in front of the park’s new Woodland Walk, a path that leads through the “natural area” of the park’s woodlands. Related: Wolfgang Buttress’ Hive is brought back to life in the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew Co-founder of Quiet Mark, Poppy Szkiler, explained that the unique treehouse is more than just a fun structure in the park, “The Quiet Treehouse is a stunning combination of the latest acoustic and architectural design, not only beautiful to the eye, but a peaceful place that represents the value of quiet. After touring some of the UK’s most prestigious events, we wanted the structure to continue its Quiet legacy with the perfect partner that would fully utilise its potential. We couldn’t have hoped for a better permanent home than the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, where it can be enjoyed by the next generation in harmony with nature.” + Quiet Mark Photography via Tom Luddington

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Celebrate the magic of silence in this enchanting sound-proof treehouse

Configurable wooden shelter hangs from the treetops

July 21, 2017 by  
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Need a quiet space to get away from it all? French architecture firm,  Les Etablissements Tourneux has created a multi-use wooden shelter that hangs from the tree tops. Although compact in size, the Sequoia Shelter is incredibly flexible thanks to multiple wooden planks with hinges, which allow the structure to be configured in a variety of shapes without causing harm to the tree or its branches. The shelter is made out of individual panels of spruce that can be configured in different shapes. It’s also possible to create various awnings and terraces within the design. The narrow apex at the top and flexible configuration were strategic to creating a hanging treehouse that causes little to no damage to trees and branches. Aesthetically, the natural spruce planks give the treehouse a light, airy feel. Related: Kengo Kuma envisions shapeshifting nomadic shelters woven from hundreds of identical wooden pieces The structure is incredibly easy to put together, making it a practical solution for off-grid living , an additional guest room, or just for plain, old fun. A flat base means it can be set on the ground and easily transported. Recently, the shelter was used as a music studio and lecture space for the Embranchements Festival in Nancy, France. + Les Etablissements Tourneux Via NotCot Images via Les Etablissements Tourneux

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Configurable wooden shelter hangs from the treetops

Shigeru Ban designs 20,000 homes for severely overcrowded refugee camp in Kenya

July 21, 2017 by  
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World-renowned architect, Shigeru Ban , is taking his talents to those who need it most. Working in collaboration with UN-Habitat, the UN agency that focuses on sustainable development , the 2014 Pritzker Prize recipient designed a prototype for some 20,000 new homes for refugees in Kenya’s Kalobeyei Refugee Settlement . True to form, Ban promotes the use of locally-sourced, sustainable materials in the shelter design. The Kalobeyei Refugee Settlement is currently home to almost 37,000 refugees, 17,000 of whom arrived in the first half of 2017 alone. This continuous influx of inhabitants is expected to increase over the next few months, putting the settlement, which has a capacity of 45,000, in a severely precarious situation. Related: 10 groundbreaking designs by Shigeru Ban that changed our ideas about architecture Ban is well-known for his dedication to humanitarian construction, having built various refugee and crisis shelters around the world, namely Rwanda, Italy, and Nepal. Ban is also known for his work with sustainable and locally-sourced materials, a trait that will be essential in the Kenyan camp. On a recent trip to the settlement, Ban highlighted the importance of using local construction techniques and sustainable materials , “The key thing will be to design and construct shelter where no or little technical supervision is required, and use materials that are locally available and eco-friendly. It’s important that the houses can be easily maintained by inhabitants.” The plan calls for Ban’s shelter design to be used initially as a prototype for 20 shelters. After a test period, the design, if successful, will be used to replace some of the camp’s deteriorating structures. + Shigeru Ban Via Archdaily Images via UNHCR

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