This cozy off-grid cabin shows beauty on a budget in upstate New York

November 8, 2017 by  
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Manhattan studio JacobsChang shows off beauty on a budget with their completion of the Half-Tree House, a one-room cabin tucked into the forests of upstate New York’s Sullivan County. Located on a remote 60-acre site, the 360-square-foot structure operates off-grid and was built by amateur weekend builders with a limited budget of $20,000. Despite the challenging steep slope, the architects and builders achieved an elegant result that dramatically juts out into the landscape. JacobsChang kept construction costs for the Half-tree House low by sourcing most of the materials on-site , including the timber cladding made from locally felled pines. To minimize site work and use of retaining walls , the architects anchored the building on one side with simple concrete footings and then used the existing trees to support the other side with a Garnier Limb anchoring system. Related: Prefab tiny cabin perched on a granite rock to minimize environmental impact Traditional Scandinavian pine tar was used to give the cabin a dark facade, which contrasts with the whitewashed interior. Three floor-to-ceiling pivoting windows open the cabin up to the outdoors, letting in ample natural light and ventilation. Say the architects: “The space is heated with a highly efficient Jotul wood stove and power, if needed, is drawn from a portable generator. The entire construction was performed by its two owners, and in the true spirit of New England barnraising, with a team of dedicated weekend support.” + JacobsChang Via ArchDaily Images © Noah Kalina

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This cozy off-grid cabin shows beauty on a budget in upstate New York

Extraordinary treehouse is a climber’s dream with its own indoor climbing wall

October 12, 2017 by  
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This narrow angular treehouse in Brisbane, Australia , captures the freedom and beauty of the outdoor-indoor lifestyle. The Taringa Treehouse, designed by Phorm Architecture + Design , is nestled under a large tree and houses a study, bedroom and a climbing wall. The entire main floor can be opened up to the exterior via sliding glass walls. The building is detached from the main residence and occupies a cozy spot under an existing tree in the backyard of the property. It’s wedge-like form points toward the residence, with its wider side facing out into the yard. A ground floor patio with a climbing wall is located at the tip of the two-story structure and opens up toward the garden via large sliding glass walls. Related: Incredible luxury tree house is hidden away in a Cape Town forest “These backyards tend to be overgrown, unruly spaces and are the domain of children and makeshift structures. The treehouse is devised as an invitation to visit and engage with this distinct yet typically unchartered territory,” said Paul Hotston of Brisbane-based Phorm Architecture + Design. Weatherboard covers the garden-facing elevation, while metal cladding dominates the western facade which creates a contrast with the verdant surroundings. The shape and materials of the house are inspired by traditional local architecture , translated into a modern-day t reehouse that’s playful and fun. + Phorm Architecture + Design Via Dezeen

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Extraordinary treehouse is a climber’s dream with its own indoor climbing wall

Sleep among the treetops in a nomadic hotel design with minimal impact

October 12, 2017 by  
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Reconnection with nature doesn’t always mean roughing it on a campsite. Environmental consulting firm EoA Inc created Living the Till, a unique treetop hotel resort concept that rescues guests from the stresses of everyday life by elevating them into the tree canopy. Conceived as a nomadic resort, the Till can be easily assembled in a variety of environments and then disassembled and moved without impacting the environment. Described by the team as a camping on a “hovering, transparent magic carpet,” Living the Till comprises a series of conical tents suspended on ropes tied to nearby trees. A large net stretched taut and secured to trees is placed beneath the tents. Bridges between the trees provide access between campsites. “Living the Till allows for seasonal inhabitation in remote areas, such as the stunning and perfectly preserved forests of Ecuador, Malaysia, Borneo, the Amazon, California, Australia, or Japan,” wrote the designers. “The concept was inspired by the air plant Tillandsia, which lives in harmony with a host tree. Conceived as a temporary nomadic structure, the Till can be assembled and taken down in pristine, coveted areas by a small team of climbers with simple tools without impacting the environment during the process or duration of a guest’s stay.” Related: Gorgeous Robin’s Nest Treehouse Hotel immerses you in nature Living the Till was recently honored as this year’s Radical Innovation Award winner. The design team was awarded a $10,000 reward at the New Museum last week. Founder of Radical Innovation John Hardy commended the project as “the perfect antidote to city dwelling.” Play Design Hotel , located in Taipei, received the second place prize of $5,000. + Radical Innovation Award Images via EoA Inc

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Sleep among the treetops in a nomadic hotel design with minimal impact

Fly down a zipline in the Willy Wonka-esque Future Forest in London

August 24, 2017 by  
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Bompas & Parr are like real-life Willy Wonkas—and they brought their magic touch to the inside of a UK shopping mall. The design duo launched a free ‘Future Forest’ in the Westfield London shopping center with the theme of urban reforestation. The immersive experience is an incredible indoor forest playground with a fantastical Fruit Cloud, electricity-producing plants, a historic tree circus, and even a 40-meter-long zip-line that starts atop a 5.3-meter-high treehouse. The Future Forest is envisioned as rural escapism in the concrete jungle that promotes relaxation, health, and wellness as well as environmental awareness . “Imagining how we can co-exist in nature is one of the key challenges facing our collective future, where we face increased urban populations while climate change and pollution threatens the stability of the natural world,” says Harry Parr, Director of Bompas & Parr. “We’ve tried to bring to life these concerns in a fun and interactive way that conveys important messages and delivers big on the fun factor too. What better way to engage young people in the future of our urban environment than by zorbing through Westfield or experiencing the fruit cloud?” Related: London to Launch Edible Fireworks Display to Ring in the New Year! The temporary nature-inspired installation first popped up earlier this summer at Westfield Stratford City and has now moved to Westfield London , where it will stay until August 28. The move to Westfield also comes with the new addition of the Adventure Zip-Line that offers an exhilarating 40-meter descent front the top of a treehouse . It is the only indoor zip-line in the UK, and free to the public. A Fruit Cloud that immerses visitors in a breathable aromatic cloud with regularly changing flavors, as well as other inspiring installations, complements the zip-line. + Bompas & Parr Images © Ann Charlott Ommedal and Bompas & Parr

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Fly down a zipline in the Willy Wonka-esque Future Forest in London

These wooden blocks can be stacked up to create cabins, treehouses, and wilderness shelters

July 31, 2017 by  
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Most cabins lie flat upon the earth – but Ofis Arhitekti just unveiled a wooden retreat that’s stacked up into the sky. The architects worked with C+C , C28 and AKT to create a beautiful library made from modular blocks at Ljubljana’s landmark medieval fortress. The basic modular unit provides accommodation for two people, with a kitchen, a bathroom, a bed and seating. If that isn’t enough space, the units can be stacked horizontally or vertically in order to form different configurations to accommodate a variety of locations and needs. Related: Three stacked spruce ‘shoeboxes’ reimagine a 1934 house in Ljubljana The units can be used as holiday cabins, tree houses, research units and shelters . The cabin can be fixed on the ground either by steel anchors or removable concrete cubes, making the interior space endlessly flexible and adjustable based on changing needs. The unit at Ljubljana Castle will serve as a temporary library, with each floor containing books on various topics. Spaces for reading and rest are tucked underneath the underpasses, and offer stunning views of the city. Both the structure and cladding promote Slovenian woodworking, traditional wood crafts and carpentry. + Ofis Arhitekti Photos by Janez Martincic  

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These wooden blocks can be stacked up to create cabins, treehouses, and wilderness shelters

Modern Mount Qiyun treehouse immerses guests in nature

May 11, 2017 by  
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A romantic weekend escape awaits lucky couples on China’s Mount Qiyun. Cambridge graduates Andong Lu and Pingping Dou of lanD studio designed Treehouse M, a prefabricated timber structure perched high in the tree canopy with sweeping panoramic views. The contemporary design and luxurious feel elevates the structure into a kind of glamping in the treetops. Prefabricated offsite with timber and steel elements, Treehouse M was assembled within a short time with minimal site impact and waste. The designers carefully sited the treehouse to immerse guests in nature at the forest resort. Panoramic views can be enjoyed from the room without compromising privacy. Related: This playful Airbnb treehouse near San Francisco lets you sleep in a 150-year-old oak tree The treehouse derives its name from its inverted roof that gives the building its M shape. Ample glazing blurs the line between indoor and outdoor living. The simple 40-square-meter interior houses a large bed, dresser, bathroom, and lounge chair. A bathtub is located on the semi-covered outdoor terrace . + lanD studio Via IGNANT Images © Bowen Hou

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Modern Mount Qiyun treehouse immerses guests in nature

Build your own tiny home or treehouse with these stackable wooden micro-units

March 29, 2017 by  
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If you’ve ever wanted to build your own tiny home or treehouse , this wild design might give you some ideas. These self-contained wooden living units can be stacked both vertically or horizontally to create the shelter of your dreams. Ofis Arhitekti teamed up with C+C, C28 and AKT and contractor Permiz to develop the basic unit to comfortably hold two people, and they’re presenting a vertical version, which is also available for purchase, at the 2017 Milan Design Week this April. The Living Unit has a timber frame structure reinforced with plywood boards on both sides. As a single unit, it can be fixed to the ground either by steel anchors or removable concrete cubes. Small and versatile, the structure can cater to different programmatic needs for two. They are easy to transport, and pretty much anyone can combine them in a variety of custom configurations. Related: 7 new micro-cabins in Colorado provide superior insulation in extreme weather The basic unit includes a double bed, wardrobe and a dining table, with the possibility of expanding it to include a small bathroom and kitchenette. Users can combine two or more cabins to create larger structures that can easily fit 4 to 6 people. The architects used natural and sustainable materials , offering flexibility in the choice of finishes, making sure to keep the design lightweight in order to facilitate ease of transportation. This allows the cabin to adapt to different locations, functions and climates. + Ofis Arhitekti

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Build your own tiny home or treehouse with these stackable wooden micro-units

Meandering 2y House in Chile immerses inhabitants in its wooded surroundings

December 30, 2016 by  
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Few things in life produce the kind of peace and serenity found in a forest. This meandering treehouse in Chile provides a complete immersion into its wooded surroundings. Sebastian Irarrazaval Arquitectos designed 2y House as a solitary retreat that enhances the unique experience of being surrounded by trees. The house is located near Lake Colico, some 470 miles south of the Chilean capital, Santiago . Locally-sourced timber anchors the house to the place and references the sense of infinity that is present in forests. Natural light filters through broad windows and wooden screens, mimicking the effect created by tree tops. Related: Gorgeous Robin’s Nest Treehouse Hotel immerses you in nature This arboreal aesthetic is further enhanced by the use of red-painted wood on the exterior. Using a natural palette of reds, browns and greens marks a departure from the concrete and glass architecture that tends to dominate Chilean residential design. + Sebastian Irarrazaval Arquitectos Via Curbed

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Meandering 2y House in Chile immerses inhabitants in its wooded surroundings

Romantic Treehouse huts are tucked away in Beijings tranquil mountains

October 6, 2016 by  
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Wee Studio’s Treehouse structures aren’t treehouses in the strict sense of the word—the timber huts are elevated, but not onto a tree. The name is likely inspired by its placement inside the grove of five poplar trees and two hawthorn trees. The 8-square-meter prefabricated buildings were built with a steel frame and comprise two polyhedrons connected by a deck. The larger of the two huts houses a tearoom with tatami flooring and overlooks the adjacent stream through large floor-to-ceiling glazing on the north side. A skylight frames views of the sky and trees and helps make the interior feel larger than its small footprint lets on. The second hut contains the bathroom. The structures are elevated off the ground to minimize site impact and to give the Treehouse the illusion of floating among the trees. The buildings are wrapped in a thermal insulating layer and are heated in winter. Related: Dramatic Dartmoor Treehouse is Woven From Wood Like a Bird’s Nest “The building of Treehouse is a practice of Wee Studio about the subtle relationship between nature and inhabitation, as well as an exploration about how to achieve the architecture in the era of internet now,” write the architects. “At the end of 2015, we initiated a crowdfunding on the Internet which had a great response in a short time. More than just about building a Treehouse on our own, the practice is more about inviting more people with same interests into the process of design and construction and having fun with it. The Treehouse is a space where you can communicate with mountain, trees, the sky and stream.” + Wee Studio Via ArchDaily Images via Wee Studio , © Sun Haiting – RoadsideAlien Studio

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Romantic Treehouse huts are tucked away in Beijings tranquil mountains

Belgian supermarket unveils plan to sell food grown on their own rooftop garden

October 6, 2016 by  
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A Belgian supermarket has unveiled plans to sell produce that will be about as local as it gets. The Boondael branch of the Delhaize supermarket chain in Ixelles, Belgium plans to start selling vegetables grown in a garden and greenhouse on the roof of their building starting in the summer of 2017. 320 square meters of rooftop space, or around 3,444 square feet, will be devoted to growing produce. Half of that space will be set aside for a greenhouse and half will allow the store to cultivate vegetables in open air. When the weather doesn’t permit use of the open air space, the store can continue growing produce in the greenhouse. The produce grow on the supermarket’s rooftop will be sold at a cheaper price than the organic produce they offer. Related: ‘Kinetic’ rooftop garden uses pallets and plants to create the illusion of movement Although ” in theory ” the produce they grow could be described as organic, technically the produce won’t receive the organic label as it is “not cultivated directly in natural soil but on a rooftop,” according to the supermarket. Delhaize hopes schools and the community will get in on the action through visits and participation. Brussels Minister for the Environment Céline Fremault told The Brussels Times, “Developing healthy, quality vegetables, based upon short cycles, is one of the challenges for the Brussels region…If everyone embraces the idea, as Delhaize has done, we will attain our target of 30 percent of fruit and vegetable production through urban agriculture, way before 2035, as is currently planned.” If all goes as planned, Delhaize will be the ” first food store in Belgium ” to grow their own produce on their rooftop. The pilot project will help Delhaize evaluate how the idea works – they don’t yet know how much product they’ll be able to grow – and if a rooftop garden can be implemented at other stores. Via RTBF and The Brussels Times Images via Delhaize and Pixabay

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