Artist uses materials found in nature to create elaborate cairns and mandalas

February 28, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Artist uses materials found in nature to create elaborate cairns and mandalas

Strolling through his hometown of Yorkshire, artist James Brunt finds artistic inspiration through almost any natural materials he can get his hands on. Whether walking along the beach or taking a forest stroll, Brunt creates intricate mandala-inspired designs out of fallen leaves, twigs or sea rocks. The determined artist will spend entire days on his land art, only to see it disappear under the rising tide waters or blown away in the wind. Brunt lets nature feed his inspiration, often wandering through dense woodlands to find the perfect place to create intricate pieces of land art. Located in Yorkshire, England, he explores nearby forests, parks, and beaches to find just the right spot and materials. When the inspiration hits him, he uses natural materials like twigs, fallen leaves, and rocks to create beautifully intricate mandala-like spirals and concentric circles.  Related: Artist turns golden leaves of Sacramento Gingko tree into inspiring works of art The artist is very considerate of the environment and takes none of the materials outside of their natural habitat. He’s also very careful not to trample natural flora or landscape. In fact, most of his land art only last a few hours, often being washed or blown away by the surrounding forces like tides or winds. You can find Brunt’s beautiful artwork on his Twitter and Facebook , where he sometimes invites people to join him in his artistic ventures. He also sells prints of his photographed artworks on his website . + James Brunt Via Bored Panda Images via James Brunt Website

More: 
Artist uses materials found in nature to create elaborate cairns and mandalas

World’s first 3D-printed camper trailer took 9 days to make

February 28, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on World’s first 3D-printed camper trailer took 9 days to make

3D printing just went seriously next level, as a Canadian team unveiled the world’s first 3D-printed camper. Weighing in as the largest indoor, single-piece 3D printed object in the world, the full-sized camper took 9 days and hundreds of feet of filament to create – and the results are pretty fantastic. ? The trailer is the first of its kind, and the sheer size of the project makes it impressive. This is no tiny trailer. The camper is 13 feet long, 6 feet wide and weighs 600 pounds – that’s 507 cubic feet of 3D-printed goodness. It’s over 3 times larger than the previous record-holding indoor, single-piece 3D print. The project was printed at Create Cafe in Saskatoon over 230 hours using the largest 3D printer in North America. Related: SOM debuts “world’s largest 3D-printed polymer building” designed for off-grid living You might think that this is just some novelty. But 3D-printed trailers have an advantage over traditional construction. Since it has no seams, you don’t have to worry about leaks. (If you’ve ever slept in a leaky camper, you know that’s major.) It also doesn’t require a chassis. And you can customize it to your wildest camper dreams. For instance, the team, led by Randy Janes of Wave of the Future 3D, designed the trailer so that it can be converted into an ice fishing cabin. Via Geek and Global News Images via Create Cafe Here it is! The world’s first 3D printed camper trailer. It’s also the largest object to ever be 3D printed at over 500 cubic feet. The trailer is on display at @CreateCafe3D in Saskatoon. #YXE #Sask @GlobalSaskatoon pic.twitter.com/hrF7UerLNb — Adam MacVicar (@AdamMacVicar) February 23, 2018

Read the rest here:
World’s first 3D-printed camper trailer took 9 days to make

Everyday objects return to their ‘roots’ by sprouting wooden branches and leaves

August 3, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Everyday objects return to their ‘roots’ by sprouting wooden branches and leaves

Seeing random greenery sprouting from your furniture is usually a sign it’s time to hire a professional housecleaner – unless, of course, its art. Lebanese-Brazilian artist Camille Kachani just unveiled a unique collection of household objects that appear to have sprouted wooden limbs and green leaves. The thought-provoking collection showcases a number of everyday furnishings reworked with plant systems that “sprout” from the objects. Chairs, shelves, shovels, rakes, books, and even ovens have been transformed with weaving roots, branches, and green leaves, resulting in a nature-inspired sculpture that brings the objects back to their original “roots.” Related: Create the perfect minimalist garden with these circular wall planters According to the artist, he reworks the objects in order to reference their natural state and show the limitless “possibilities related to the process of transformation of nature.” By rendering the furnishings or tools unusable, the hybrid objects appear to be slowly returning to their natural form. + Camille Kachan Via This is Colossal

See more here:
Everyday objects return to their ‘roots’ by sprouting wooden branches and leaves

Trump waives dozens of environmental laws to speed construction of his wall

August 3, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Trump waives dozens of environmental laws to speed construction of his wall

An anonymous official revealed two weeks ago that Trump intends to decimate the “crown jewel” of the national refuge system in order to build his border wall. Now, the Department of Homeland Security has announced it would disregard dozens of environmental rules in order to rush construction, which could start as soon as January. Workers have already been on site to prepare for building. The government is allowed to waive environmental requirements in order to build infrastructure, including skirting the National Environmental Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act and the Clean Water Act. In order to avoid dealing with private land owners, Trump’s wall is slated to start in the Santa Ana refuge, and while building in any refuge would be awful for the environment, the Sant Ana refuge is particularly devastating because it is home to the endangered ocelot, jaguar and jaguarondi. It is also one of the most cherished bird refuges in the US. “The lower Rio Grande is a national treasure for birds,” said Michael J. Parr, President of American Bird Conservancy . Related: “Crown jewel” wildlife refuge to be decimated as Trump starts building border wall Funding for the wall has already been approved by the House and now it is heading to the Senate for approval. It includes a provision for rebuilding the wall in San Diego, which was built just a decade ago. “Replacing the San Diego border wall only a decade after it was built shows that the border wall has always been stupid, ineffective and incredibly expensive,” Brian Segee, attorney for the Center for Biological Diversity said. “Trump’s border wall would compound this travesty by dividing and destroying more communities, wildlife and wild places.” Meanwhile, one of the most incredible bird watching refuges in the US stands to be split in half by the wall unless the Senate is convinced to kill funding. Via Grist Images via Flickr , Wikimedia and Wikimedia

More here: 
Trump waives dozens of environmental laws to speed construction of his wall

Bad Behavior has blocked 883 access attempts in the last 7 days.