Etsy takes aim at shipping and packaging in setting 2030 net-zero goal

March 16, 2021 by  
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Etsy takes aim at shipping and packaging in setting 2030 net-zero goal Deonna Anderson Tue, 03/16/2021 – 05:00 Scope 3 emissions are the hardest emissions for companies to address when setting goals. But often, they are the most emissions to take on. For Etsy, the e-commerce marketplace known for handmade items like jewelry, art and apparel, Scope 3 emissions make up 99 percent of the company’s carbon footprint. That’s why it’s prioritizing engagement with sellers in its marketplace to drive down emissions. The ambition is part of the company’s net-zero carbon emissions by 2030 goal, which it set in February.   “I know many companies have different definitions of net-zero. We are definitely following the Science-Based Targets Initiative’s (SBTI) forthcoming emerging definition around net-zero ,” said Chelsea Mozen, director of sustainability at Etsy, who as one of the company’s first sustainability hires has helped build its strategy from the ground up. “It has been a really fun journey over the past seven years,” Mozen observed. “In the beginning, we really focused on our own operation, so getting our own house in order.” In addition to the net-zero goal, the e-commerce site has set two science-based targets using a baseline year of 2019, which are pending validation from the SBT i. They call for: a 50 percent absolute reduction in Scope 1 and 2 greenhouse gas emissions by 2030, including Etsy’s office operations and purchased energy a 13.5 percent absolute reduction in Scope 3 greenhouse gas emissions by 2030, including seller shipping and fulfillment The company’s most recent 10-K form for the fiscal year that ended Dec. 31, 2020, which it files annually with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, also noted a 2021 goal to “offset 100 percent of measured Scope 1, 2 and 3 greenhouse gas emissions annually.”  In a blog about the new net-zero pledge , Etsy CEO Josh Silverman wrote, “We’re committed to holding ourselves accountable and maintaining transparency as we push toward a net-zero 2030.” Mozen said that as the company makes its way toward the net-zero goal, it will continue the practice of reporting all of its sustainability metrics in its 10-K form, as well as within its Sustainability Accounting Standards Board (SASB) and Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures (TCFD) disclosures. Only 10 percent of companies are integrating sustainability metrics into 10-K filings, according to SASB . A couple of years ago, when Etsy first started including such metrics in its filings , former Etsy Senior Sustainability Manager Hilary Young, who still works at the company in a different role, wrote, “Key non-financial metrics around our economic, social and ecological impact are an integral part of how we run Etsy. It just makes sense for us to report those metrics in the same place.” The idea was that we know with the urgency of the climate crisis, we wanted to do something to immediately address that impact while we work towards long term reductions. In order to be transparent about its sustainability work, Etsy has to do the relevant work behind those reports. In recent years, Etsy has been working on addressing the carbon impact of its marketplace, which is made up of nearly 4.5 million sellers with more than 85 million items available for sale, as of December 2020. Back in 2019, Etsy launched its first initiative focused on reducing the carbon emissions of its marketplace by introducing carbon offset shipping . To offset shipping, Etsy estimates the emissions created by each product sold by looking at data such as the distance between a seller and buyer for each order and the expected weight of the items. Etsy then works with 3Degrees , a carbon offset and renewable energy company, to invest in emissions reduction projects such as wind and solar farms or forest protection.  Mozen said this was an obvious step for the company to address the emissions for the marketplace because it is the source of Etsy’s largest measured carbon impact.   In 2020, Etsy offset 404,439 metric tons of carbon in total and shipping alone was 303,218 metrics tons CO2 equivalent in 2020, according to the company. “The idea was that we know with the urgency of the climate crisis, we wanted to do something to immediately address that impact while we work towards long-term reductions,” she said. The third-largest area of Etsy’s footprint is purchased goods and services in its corporate supply chain, according to Mozen. Between now and 2030, Etsy said it plans to deepen its engagement on climate with vendors and will continue to prioritize partners that share similar carbon standards. Here’s a recent example of how Etsy has already done this: In 2020, the company completed its migration to Google Cloud, which combined with a 15-year power purchase agreement helped in reaching its goal to be 100 percent renewably powered by 2020 .  “From 2018 to 2020, our energy use for computing decreased by 23 percent. And that is largely thanks to the efficiency of Google Cloud Platform compared to what we have in our own colocated data centers,” Mozen said. And in total, last year, 81 percent of the money Etsy spent in its supply chain went to companies that have set a greenhouse gas emissions reduction goal. But a lot of the focus will be on other areas of Etsy’s business, over which it doesn’t necessarily have direct influence, she added. For example, in 2020, 75 percent of Etsy’s carbon footprint came from shipping, which it doesn’t have control over — its sellers ship directly to buyers.  “But we will be looking at that footprint,” said Mozen, who noted that the company thinks one of the ways to address shipping emissions is through public policy.  “There’s been a lot of moves in the space right now. And we’ve been very active in it,” she said. “We’re gonna double down on advocating for the decarbonization of the logistics sector. And that, for the next few years, will be very important as we head towards 2030.” In 2020, Etsy advocated for the Transportation and Climate Initiative, for which it received an award from the Ceres BICEP Network, as well as the California Air Resources Board (CARB) Advanced Clean Trucks Rule and other regional policies that the company believes have the potential to accelerate the decarbonization of the transportation sector. Etsy also plans to address the second largest contributor to its footprint, packaging, which it started measuring in 2020, Mozen said.  “We’re hopeful that providing more tools for [sellers] will help drive some of these decreases in our carbon footprint, especially in the packaging space,” she said. “We’re hoping that partnerships for more sustainable packaging that will be affordable for our sellers will help reduce that footprint.” She said Etsy is also interested in digging into the circular packaging space. “This would be early days for us. But that’s where I hope that we can make some gains.” Pull Quote The idea was that we know with the urgency of the climate crisis, we wanted to do something to immediately address that impact while we work towards long term reductions. Topics Shipping & Logistics E-commerce Packaging Net-Zero Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Etsy’s annex office in Hudson, New York. Courtesy of Etsy.

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Etsy takes aim at shipping and packaging in setting 2030 net-zero goal

Charge Your Electric Vehicle at Home — and on the Go

March 10, 2021 by  
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If you don’t already own an electric vehicle (EV), you might soon. Most automakers are… The post Charge Your Electric Vehicle at Home — and on the Go appeared first on Earth911.

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Researchers develop hydrogen paste that could fuel vehicles

February 17, 2021 by  
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A team of researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute of Manufacturing Technology and Advanced Materials (IFAM) has developed a hydrogen paste that could one day be used to fuel vehicles. In the Germany-based institute’s latest development, the team came up with a product it calls POWERPASTE, which could be revolutionary in the transport sector. The product is created from a magnesium base and would be stored in vehicles in the form of a cartridge. Those who wish to use this form of fuel for vehicles would be required to purchase hydrogen paste cartridges . To refuel, a driver would swap a used hydrogen cartridge with a new one and then fill the tank with water. Related: Hydrogen fuel cells — good or bad for the environment? Marcus Vogt, research associate at IFAM, explained how the paste works. “POWERPASTE stores hydrogen in a chemical form at room temperature and atmospheric pressure to be then released on-demand,” Vogt said. The researchers say that the paste offers a safe, convenient and affordable hydrogen fuel option for small vehicles. The paste begins to decompose at 480°F, meaning it can be used in cars even in the hottest regions of the world. The POWERPASTE has been praised by the developers for its capacity. “POWERPASTE … has a huge energy storage density,” Vogt said. “It is substantially higher than that of a 700 bar high-pressure tank. And compared to batteries, it has 10 times the energy storage density.” Given that the paste is similar to gasoline in terms of range, it could be a viable alternative. As a result, researchers are proposing the use of the paste in smaller vehicles. They also say that its use could be extended to drones. In recent years, many companies and countries have been shifting attention to hydrogen-based energy solutions. In a bid to avoid the problems caused by fossil fuels , hydrogen technologies such as POWERPASTE are being developed. + IFAM Via Business Insider Image via IFAM

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Global Forest Watch can now see through clouds to stop deforestation

February 17, 2021 by  
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Last year, the Global Forest Watch tracking system starting allowing people to help monitor deforestation in far-flung parts of the world while sitting at home with their laptop. But the satellite program had a flaw: perpetrators could hide behind cloud cover. The system recently announced a new upgrade that uses radar to see right through the clouds. “Essentially, the satellites are sending radio waves to Earth and collecting how they come back,” said Mikaela Weisse, one of site administrators, as reported by NPR . Operated by the European Space Agency, the instrument is delivering sharper pictures than ever. “If we can detect deforestation and other changes as soon as they’re happening, then there’s the possibility to send in law enforcement or what have you, to stop it before it goes further.” Related: You can help monitor Amazon deforestation from your couch The software scans for changes, such as trees disappearing, and issues alerts when it detects something fishy. About once a week, the satellites re-scan each place that they are monitoring. Global Forest Watch has been popular with citizen scientists — ordinary people without training as data or climate experts — who want to do their part to slow deforestation. The app depends on a combination of artificial and human intelligence to monitor the world’s forests. Preliminary studies indicate that the monitoring is paying off. There’s been less forest -clearing in some places when people know their illegal actions are being observed. Eventually, evildoers figured out that clouds would cloak their deeds, so they would clear land under cover of rain, according to Weisse. This was an especially big problem in the tropics. “In Indonesia, my impression is, it’s the rainy season almost all the time,” Weisse said. “There’s almost always cloud cover.” Global Forest Watch is available for anybody to login and see deforestation in real time. Let’s hope that big companies that have pledged not to support deforestation will use this tool to live up to their promises. + Global Forest Watch Via NPR Image via Gryffyn M.

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Global Forest Watch can now see through clouds to stop deforestation

3Degree’s Dave Meyer on the future of the Low Carbon Fuel Standard in America

November 20, 2020 by  
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3Degree’s Dave Meyer on the future of the Low Carbon Fuel Standard in America This video is sponsored by 3Degrees. “Transportation is the single largest contributor to GHG emissions in California, so if we are going to meet the targets generally that California has set, addressing these emissions from transportation is going to have to be a big part of that.”   Katie Fehrenbacher, Senior Analyst, Transportation, Greenbiz, interviewed Dave Meyer, Director, LCFS Programs, 3Degrees, during VERGE 20, which took place 10/26-10/30/20. View archived videos from the conference here: https://www.greenbiz.com/topics/verge-20-archive . YanniGuo Fri, 11/20/2020 – 11:24 Featured Off

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Earth911 Podcast: Talking Carbon Offsets With Cool Effect’s Blake Lawrence

November 18, 2020 by  
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Carbon emissions continue to accumulate, affecting the world’s weather patterns … The post Earth911 Podcast: Talking Carbon Offsets With Cool Effect’s Blake Lawrence appeared first on Earth 911.

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Earth911 Podcast: Talking Carbon Offsets With Cool Effect’s Blake Lawrence

This is the moment to reimagine public transportation

September 29, 2020 by  
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This is the moment to reimagine public transportation Amanda Eaken Tue, 09/29/2020 – 00:21 Back in April, the city of Seattle temporarily closed off nearly 20 miles of streets to most vehicular traffic in order to let residents bike, walk, jog and skate at a safe social distance during the height of the city’s COVID-19 pandemic. Seattle’s Stay Healthy Streets program was designed to encourage people to travel to essential services and small local businesses — or just to get outside for exercise or fun — at a time when many people felt anxious about doing so. While wildfires ravaging the West Coast and smoke clouding the air across Seattle create yet another barrier to getting outside, these hazy skies also underscore the importance of defending our air quality, right now and for years to come. Then, in early May, something unexpected happened: the temporary closure of these streets became permanent . Mayor Jenny Durkan — one of 25 mayors nationwide participating in the Bloomberg Philanthropies American Cities Climate Challenge  — announced that the program’s popularity and success had convinced her to extend it beyond the end of Washington Gov. Jay Inslee’s stay-at-home order. In explaining the rationale for the decision, the head of Seattle’s Department of Transportation described the impact of Stay Healthy Streets as “transformative,” adding that it had revealed a need “to continue to build out a transportation system that enables people of all ages and abilities to bike and walk across the city.”  If governments are serious about listening and responding to the needs of communities of color, they’ll make the improvement and expansion of our transit systems a top priority. These days, as wildfires ravage the West Coast and smoke clouds Seattle’s air, residents face yet another barrier to getting outside. These toxic, hazy skies underscore the importance of defending our air quality, right now and for years to come. And we’re not starting from scratch: For years, Seattle’s transportation department and others in city leadership have been working to reduce the health-harming pollution from cars, trucks and other sources. Seattle’s Stay Healthy Streets program is the latest in those efforts: In addition to being safe places to walk and ride, these streets are free of polluting cars. Beyond Seattle and wildfires in the west, the COVID-19 crisis has compelled cities all over the world to reconsider — and, in many cases, to reimagine — their previously held ideas about our transportation systems. First and foremost, it has forced them to acknowledge that bus drivers, subway conductors and other mass-transit personnel are essential workers , every bit as crucial to the continued functioning of society as the people who work at our hospitals, grocery stores, restaurants and pharmacies. Indeed, in New York City, public transportation is how most essential workers have been getting to their jobs during the pandemic. And for millions of residents who don’t have access to a car, including a disproportionate number of low-income people and people of color, it’s their primary means of getting around, pandemic or no pandemic. But our current crisis has forced us to admit something else, too: Transportation policy isn’t just about getting people from point A to point B. Rather, it’s inextricably connected to public health, racial and economic justice, climate action and civil society in ways that haven’t always been fully acknowledged, but that are becoming clearer every day. One surprising example? In San Francisco, a professional cellist gave impromptu performances from his doorstep, creating a magical experience for neighbors and people walking by — an experience that was only audible due to the reduction in car traffic.  Seattle’s decision to turn its streets into pedestrian- and bike-friendly zones is just one example of how cities are recognizing that transportation is about regional accessibility just as much if not more than mobility. In doing so, they’re putting themselves on a path towards a healthier, more equitable future. Here are three ways we can reimagine our city transportation systems.  1. Streets aren’t just for cars  Seattle was just one of many cities around the world to open up its streets as it (mostly) closed down for everyday business. From megacities such as London , Paris , and New York to Climate Challenge participants such as Austin and San Jose , officials have discovered the many and compounding benefits that come from redefining thoroughfares to promote walking, cycling and other emissions-free forms of transportation. Adding safe places to walk and bike to our urban landscapes invites people out of their automobiles, resulting in cleaner air and fewer planet-warming greenhouse gases in our atmosphere. But it does more than that: It improves public health by promoting exercise, and fosters community by beautifying our neighborhoods and making people excited to get out of the house and be around one another (while still practicing social distancing and mask-wearing, of course!). It also addresses inequities inherent in public safety: People of color and members of underserved communities are more likely to become victims of automobile traffic violence. In addition, “slow streets” programs in many cities are helping residents rethink what streets are for.  2. Our public transit infrastructure needs — and deserves — investment For decades, America’s public transit systems have languished in the shadow of a $98 billion backlog in deferred maintenance and replacement. These are the very same public transit systems that kept some of our biggest cities from collapsing entirely during the height of the COVID-19 crisis by transporting essential workers to their jobs and allowing people without access to a car to visit their doctors, buy food and obtain medicine. While we’re lauding efforts by cities to get more people moving around on foot or bicycles, we also should be pressuring local, state and national leaders to fill this backlog and update our mass transit infrastructure. And we need to be clear that “updating,” in this instance, doesn’t simply mean replacing the hardware — installing new tracks or buying new buses. Public officials must make investments that prioritize the needs of riders most affected by this crisis by reimagining public safety and promoting public health, affordable housing and economic opportunity in historically marginalized communities. COVID and post-COVID recovery plans need to make this a priority, and the congressional champions of infrastructure bills such as the INVEST in America Act and the Moving Forward Act need to fight hard for adequate funding and a holistic, equitable approach to spending. Which brings us to:  3. Access to safe, effective transit is very much a racial justice issue  Recent incidents of police brutality against people of color, and the mass protests that have occurred in their wake, have led to a long-overdue national discussion of how systemic racism and the legacy of white supremacy continue to permeate our public policy. For many Black and brown residents, transportation already means public transportation: the buses; subways; and light-rail lines on which they rely daily for getting to work, school or essential services. When we neglect these systems, we’re neglecting these communities and in our common humanity, neglecting ourselves. Any efforts to remedy and redress the inequities borne of institutional racism are incomplete if they don’t acknowledge that mobility is a right, and that hampering people’s mobility — be it direct through poor planning, gentrification, redlining or underfunding or indirect through an act of omission — is an unacceptable violation of that right. If governments are serious about listening and responding to the needs of communities of color, they’ll make the improvement and expansion of our transit systems a top priority. We’re living through several pivotal moments in American history at once. In responding to the simultaneous crises we currently face, we have a responsibility to not just return to the status quo, but to boldly and intentionally improve public health, racial equity and climate resiliency. Reimagining our transportation systems is the critical first step to shaping a more just future.  Pull Quote If governments are serious about listening and responding to the needs of communities of color, they’ll make the improvement and expansion of our transit systems a top priority. Topics Transportation & Mobility Equity & Inclusion NRDC Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off In May, some closures that started with Seattle Healthy Streets became permanent. Shutterstock VDB Photos Close Authorship

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An idea for solving the plastics crisis

September 15, 2020 by  
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An idea for solving the plastics crisis Sara Kingman Tue, 09/15/2020 – 01:30 A major problem with behavior-change programs in the waste industry is that they rely on consumers being taught to feel the guilt of plastic in the ocean, and the harm to turtles and whales. They’ve tried to condition people to believe that if we buy so-called “zero waste kits,” choose zucchini and cucumbers without plastic shrink-wrap and champion our favorite reusable metal straws, these choices alone somehow will drive a reduction in single-use plastics. While these steps can provide some benefit — and the strategy of creating consumer guilt shouldn’t be entirely discredited — this narrative is misguided. Ultimately, it never will address the root of the issue. Instead, savvy leaders in architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) are focusing more attention on the plastics industry — and by extension, the oil industry. First, those producers and their trade groups for decades have driven misleading, consumer-centric campaigns that redirect societal blame and attention away from the pollution they create. The classic examples include “sustainability” statements made by plastics industry leaders promoting recycling . These campaigns insinuate: “If consumers recycle correctly, the waste problem will be solved and the Great Pacific Garbage Patch will disappear.” This is plainly false propaganda, evident first by the astounding fact that a mere 8.4 percent of America’s plastic waste is actually recycled . Regardless whether designers of the built environment are involved in the policies of overseas plastics recycling, we create structures in which plastics are fixed in place and the spaces that plastics move through. As a society and as AEC professionals, we can’t continue allowing the plastics industry and oil producers to govern our approach to sustainability. Plastics are the problem — and recycling is not the solution. So how can more professionals in building design and construction make a difference? First, admit that recycling is broken. For the past decade, American consumers and businesses have relied on China to accept our immeasurable wave of plastic waste. The U.S. was not sending clean, recyclable material but rather plastics covered in food remains, which turned into mold in the transportation process and became excessively difficult to process upon arrival. Inevitably, by 2018 China instituted a strict contamination allowance under the National Sword policy, which effectively meant Americans no longer could export plastic waste to China. No one blames China for this decision — U.S. leaders should have had the foresight and environmental consciousness to realize the process relied on for the previous decade was not only unsustainable, it also wasn’t even a cost-effective solution for the long term. Now is the time to look domestically and reframe U.S. waste management — and quickly, because in the meantime America’s plastic waste is being landfilled and burned at an alarming rate, both domestically and abroad. Second, consider the AEC industry’s potentially powerful role in this. Regardless whether designers of the built environment are involved in the policies of overseas plastics recycling, we create structures in which plastics are fixed in place and the spaces that plastics move through. Clearly, we can have a significant impact. For example, building designers should: Create sustainable purchasing policies for clients, to be enforced throughout the lifetime of a building’s operations, governing the behaviors of all tenants. These would ensure single-use materials, and especially single-use plastic purchases, are minimized throughout the building’s lifetime. The policy facilitates the best opportunities to allow occupants to act in an environmentally conscious manner. Specify Red List -free building materials . This eliminates all toxic and socially harmful materials, simultaneously decreasing reliance on petrochemicals. Keep in mind, even if plastic building products are retained in situ for 60 years, at end-of-life they are still being landfilled. It’s unhealthy, and we don’t need and shouldn’t foster use of these materials in any buildings. Advocate for improvements to building materials and assemblies. More AEC leaders need to ask vendors and manufacturers to improve their products by decoupling from petrochemical-based ingredients. Many would be glad to comply. It’s time to face down this challenge. It is the responsibility of designers of the built environment to operate beyond our traditionally defined boundaries and insist our buildings meet the highest standards possible. It is also our responsibility to be educators and help show those around us how to ensure a healthy and sustainable world for future generations. The problem is not consumer choices or their commitment to recycling correctly — the problem is plastics, period. Without doubt or hesitation, we need action today by the AEC industry to stop the cycle of pollution from this endemic industry. Pull Quote Regardless whether designers of the built environment are involved in the policies of overseas plastics recycling, we create structures in which plastics are fixed in place and the spaces that plastics move through. Topics Circular Economy Buildings Plastic Procurement Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off

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An idea for solving the plastics crisis

Policy for a Circular Economy: Part 2

September 15, 2020 by  
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Policy for a Circular Economy: Part 2 How should diverse corporate stakeholders —such as brands and packaging producers — help shape the U.S. policy landscape around plastics, recycling and solid waste management? This two part policy session, organized in collaboration with the The Recycling Partnership, will focus on the role that brand and packaging producers can play in forging a stronger policy environment in the U.S. to create more circular outcomes. The steady growth of public attention around plastics and packaging has led to a revitalized policy focus in the U.S. on recycling and solid waste management in 2020. Historically, brands and packaging producers have played an antagonistic role in the U.S. packaging policy landscape. However, the emergence of a circular economy opportunity and the urgency of science-based action are creating the conditions for value chain engagement and collective participation in the policymaking process. Speakers Elizabeth Biser, VP Policy & Public Affairs, The Recycling Partnership Nicole Collier, Director of Policy & Public Affairs, Nestlé Dylan de Thomas, VP of Industry Collaboration, The Recycling Partnership Missy Owens, Director, Government Relations, Federal & Diplomatic, Coca-Cola  Holly Secon Mon, 09/14/2020 – 23:59 Featured Off

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Financing Circularity

September 15, 2020 by  
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Financing Circularity What new strategies are enabling companies and sectors to finance circularity at scale? The circular economy offers significant value and new growth opportunities. In the plastic value chain alone, research shows that compared with business-as-usual, a circular economy has the potential to reduce the annual volume of plastics entering our oceans by 80 percent, reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 25 percent, generate savings of $200 billion per year, and create 700,000 additional jobs by 2040. The circular economy can create value in similar ways across other sectors of the economy. As we look for ways to recover from the economic shock of the pandemic, the circular economy presents a pathway to build back better. Through the capital markets, investors can help build a more resilient economy that addresses global challenges, creates jobs, and benefits society. Speakers Rob Opsomer, Executive Lead, Systemic Initiatives, Ellen MacArthur Foundation Audrey Choi, Chief Marketing Officer & Chief Sustainability Officer, Morgan Stanley Holly Secon Mon, 09/14/2020 – 23:35 Featured Off

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Financing Circularity

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