Massive electric vehicle charging system coming to L.A.

November 8, 2021 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Massive electric vehicle charging system coming to L.A.

The Los Angeles Department of Transportation (LADOT) has been awarded a $6 million grant to build one of the largest electric vehicle fleet charging systems in the United States. The system will be fully powered by a solar and storage microgrid. The grant, provided by the California Energy Commission, intends to help the state transition into clean energy transport and move closer to its net-zero targets. Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti said that the project aims to put more electric vehicles on the road to lower emissions. Related: Kalk anti-poaching e-bikes join the battle in the African bush “Los Angeles is on track to achieve a zero-emission future and our investments in clean transportation systems are driving that progress,” said Garcetti. “The more electric vehicles we put on our streets today, the more we can lower emissions to ensure a healthier, more sustainable tomorrow.” LADOT has a plan that will see it transition to a fully electric fleet by 2028. Solar power will help the agency adopt more electric buses to help with the smooth transition into the electric vehicle phase. The system’s microgrid will come fully paired with 104 EV chargers. The agency has settled on Proterra and Apparent to install the EV charging microgrid at the Washington Bus Yard, which will handle EV charging for over 100 buses. “Meeting our climate and sustainability goals requires persistent investment and urgent action,” said Seleta Reynolds, LADOT General Manager. “This grant provides an essential support facility as we move closer to our goal of a fully electric fleet.” To achieve its targets, LADOT will deploy 1.5 megawatts of rooftop and bus canopy. The solar will be supported by 4.5MWh worth of energy storage at the Washington Bus Yard provided by Apparent. The power will be deployed cumulatively to recharge buses at the station, thanks to Proterra’s 1.5-megawatt fleet chargers. With 104 remote EV dispensers, the yard will provide one of the largest electric car charging points in the country. “Transit agencies and fleet operators need resilient, reliable charging solutions to help power the switch to electric fleets. This innovative project is a model for how we can power commercial electric vehicle fleets and support a sustainable, clean transportation future with renewable energy solutions,” said Gareth Joyce, President of Proterra. “We are excited to extend the benefits of our technology to help power Los Angeles’s transition to zero-emission, electric transit buses.” + LADOT Lead image via Pixabay

See the original post:
Massive electric vehicle charging system coming to L.A.

New facility to create 400,000 pounds of lab-grown meat a year

November 8, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on New facility to create 400,000 pounds of lab-grown meat a year

Goodbye slaughterhouses, hello humane future. UPSIDE Foods just opened a major production facility to produce lab-grown  meat . The food  technology  startup, formerly known as Memphis Meats, chose Emeryville, California, for its abattoir alternative. Emeryville is tucked between Berkeley and Oakland — a suitable place, since the Bay Area is known as a vegan stronghold. Related: Singapore is the first country to approve lab-grown meat UPSIDE’s Engineering, Production, and Innovation Center (EPIC) is a visitor-friendly 53,000 square foot space that resembles a brewery more than a sticky, smelly slaughterhouse. “When we founded UPSIDE in 2015, it was the only cultivated meat company in a world full of skeptics,” said UPSIDE CEO and founder Uma Valeti in a statement. “Today, that dream becomes a reality. The journey from tiny  cells  to EPIC has been an incredible one, and we are just getting started.” EPIC can currently produce 50,000 pounds of lab-grown meat annually, with plans to scale up to more than 400,000 pounds. However, regulatory approval is still a stumbling block. So far,  Singapore  is the only country to approve cell-based meat — in that case, manufactured by Eat Just, which also makes the egg-free JUST Egg. Qatar may also be on the cutting edge and could be the next country to approve lab-grown meat. UPSIDE looked ahead when it included a room to be used by federal inspectors in its EPIC buildout. “UPSIDE Foods continues to be a trailblazer in the industry, and their groundbreaking facility means consumers are now closer than ever before to buying cultivated meat in stores,” said Bruce Friedrich, founder and CEO of  food  advocacy nonprofit Good Food Institute, in a statement. “UPSIDE’s new Center will be focused on key technical hurdles and producing cultivated meat for consumers at scale.” Valeti, a cardiologist, founded UPSIDE to bring a less environmentally harmful product to market. UPSIDE was a pioneer in lab-grown meat, and the first company to entice significant investors. Now over 70 companies are working on similar products. Via VegNews Lead image via UPSIDE Foods

View original post here:
New facility to create 400,000 pounds of lab-grown meat a year

Ridepanda streamlines the hunt for the right e-ride

October 8, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Ridepanda streamlines the hunt for the right e-ride

With a widespread discussion about reducing  pollution  from vehicle emissions, a company called Ridepanda has biked into the conversation with the first online e-dealership, which peddles e-mobility options.  The goal is not only to provide a central location for e-bike, e-scooter, and e-moped shopping, but to pivot the way people are thinking about transportation options. Ridepanda’s mission is to help transform personal transportation in a way that encourages better health for the rider as well as the citizens who benefit from cleaner air. Compared to renting e-rides regularly or investing in a car, the cost of purchasing e-transport is a budget-friendly option too. Related: This university student built her own wooden e-bike, Electraply Conscientious consumers around the planet are driving demand for electric vehicles, and not just cars. The other e-options also contribute to a healthier  environment , improved air quality, reduced carbon emissions and minimized noise pollution.  The company reports, “Ridepanda offers a handpicked selection of e-bikes , e-mopeds and e-scooters, along with essential add-ons including financing, maintenance, warranties and personalized customer services.” The goal is to make it easier to convert the daily commute towards electric modes of transportation. It’s a need that was already there, according to co-founders Chinmay Malaviya and Charlie Depman, who both previously worked at companies like Lime, Bird and Scoot. “The support from investors will be used to make technological improvements to our platform to streamline the process of discovering, purchasing, owning, and maintaining light electric vehicles . This includes building tailored experiences for specific demographics, strengthening our vetting system, improving our ridefinder recommendation engine, and helping governments utilize e-bike rebates and subsidies,” Depman said. The company is currently watching the recently introduced E-BIKE Act, which would offer substantial e-bike rebates. Ridepanda is also working with San Mateo County and its utility provider Peninsula Clean Energy to streamline the introduction of local e-bike rebate programs. + Ridepanda  Images via Ridepanda

Here is the original post: 
Ridepanda streamlines the hunt for the right e-ride

Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions From Buses Today & Tomorrow

October 7, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions From Buses Today & Tomorrow

Date/Time: November 2, 2021 (1-2PM ET / 10-11AM PT) Strategies for addressing air quality and climate change challenges  need to be more nuanced than making all vehicles electric. This is particularly true for commercial vehicles such as buses, which have different power needs and workloads than passenger cars. Learn about tangible actions cities and companies can take today to address these challenges, — like fuel switching, which provides immediate benefits without requiring infrastructure changes or increasing the demand on the electrical grid.  The webcast will also cover potential opportunities for dramatic improvements in the longer term as government spending improves the affordability of fuel cell, battery and hybrid vehicles and the infrastructure needed to support them. Specifically, you’ll learn: How companies and municipalities can reduce their transportation-related carbon footprint now Why transit is well-suited for greenhouse gas emissions reductions How infrastructure spending may help accelerate the adoption of new transportation technologies Moderator: Jim Giles, Carbon Analyst, GreenBiz Group Speakers: Eli Lipmen, Director, Development and Programming, MOVE LA If you can’t tune in live, please register and we will email you a link to access the archived webcast footage and resources, available to you on-demand after the webcast.

See the original post here:
Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions From Buses Today & Tomorrow

Michigan plans to build the first EV charging road in U.S.

October 6, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Michigan plans to build the first EV charging road in U.S.

Last month, State Governor Gretchen Whitmer announced that the state of Michigan has announced an ambitious plan to build the country’s first wireless electric vehicle charging road. It will help the state meet its net-zero target by 2050, according to Whitmer. The one-mile stretch will be built in Metro Detroit at a proposed cost of $1.9 million if the plan is implemented. In a press release sent to media houses, Whitmer said that Michigan was the first state to build paved roads in the country. The state is also on course to be the first to build roads for the future. Related: The City One is a compact, community-focused electric car “Michigan was home to the first mile of paved road, and now we’re paving the way for the roads of tomorrow,” Whitmer said, “with innovative infrastructure that will support the economy and the environment.”  The world’s first electric car charging road was built in Sweden in 2018 at the cost of $2.4 million. These types of roads work on the concept of magnetic induction. As a car drives on the road, the battery is charged by pads built under the road through magnetic induction. The road does not give the car full charge but helps provide additional power to sustain the vehicle until the next charging point. While in Michigan the idea behind electric car charging roads is still in its infancy, the Michigan Department of Transportation has already started accepting proposals for the project. When one is accepted, there will be a clearer picture of how the road will look like. The project has received both praises and criticism, with some players in the industry terming it as “unviable” and “a waste of resources.” Chris Mi, chair of the electrical and computer engineering department at San Diego State University, said in an interview that the project is unrealistic on a large scale. For the road to be usable, cars have to be built with a receiver capable of receiving electromagnetic induction power . It would make electric cars unaffordable for most people. Additionally, weather is another major issue, according to Mi.  “Michigan in the winter gets potholes all over the place, which means any of the wireless transmission systems you buried down in the road will be damaged in a couple of years,” he said. Critiques also argue that for a state-ranked 36th in terms of transport infrastructure, building such a road is not a priority. The money might be of more value if directed to other transport facilities such as commuter train systems. Via Grist Lead image via Pexels

See original here: 
Michigan plans to build the first EV charging road in U.S.

Earth911 Podcast: Author Chunka Mui on Building a Perfect Future for Our Children

October 4, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Earth911 Podcast: Author Chunka Mui on Building a Perfect Future for Our Children

The future is not written, we can make a better, sustainable future for our children… The post Earth911 Podcast: Author Chunka Mui on Building a Perfect Future for Our Children appeared first on Earth911.

Original post:
Earth911 Podcast: Author Chunka Mui on Building a Perfect Future for Our Children

Greening the board game industry with Big Potato Games

September 7, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Greening the board game industry with Big Potato Games

Party games can be a fun reason for everyone to get together, but they can also take a lot of resources to make. Big Potato takes a sustainable approach to make game time a little greener. You may have seen Big Potato games in the past. The company is responsible for titles such as Herd Mentality, Mean Girls the Party Game and The Chameleon. These games are available at major retailers all over the U.S., including Target. Big Potato gets ideas from everywhere for their games. People from game designers to everyday gamers have submitted game ideas. Related: Indie comic book characters are brought to life as unique cardboard cutouts While focusing on games that are easy to play and understand, Big Potato takes a sustainable approach to improve the planet with each game it makes. The company works with the Eden Reforestation Project and Ecologi to plant a tree for every game sold. It’s their “one game, one tree” commitment. Through this initiative, Big Potato is planting mangrove trees in Madagascar and working toward reforestation in Mozambique and Kenya. Almost 900 trees have already been planted. But wait, there’s more. Big Potato has cut back on excess packaging and transportation, streamlining its manufacturing and shipping practices. The games are put in the smallest possible boxes to reduce the space taken up inside the truck, meaning more items can ship at once. This helps lower the transportation pollution involved in shipping the games. Big Potato is also looking for ways to cut back on plastic. The company has committed to making 64% of its games being plastic -free by the end of 2021. This goal will be achieved by targeting the plastic waste commonly associated with boxed games, such as shrink wrap around the boxes and game cards and plastic box inserts inside the game. Instead, cellulose stickers will secure the boxes, and recyclable paper bands will keep the game cards in place. + Big Potato Games Images via Big Potato Games

Excerpt from: 
Greening the board game industry with Big Potato Games

Earth911 Podcast: Ideanomics Is Building a Renewable Energy-based Transportation Infrastructure

July 26, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Earth911 Podcast: Ideanomics Is Building a Renewable Energy-based Transportation Infrastructure

Earth911’s Mitch Ratcliffe talks with Ideanomics CEO Alf Poor about the evolution of transportation. We… The post Earth911 Podcast: Ideanomics Is Building a Renewable Energy-based Transportation Infrastructure appeared first on Earth911.

Here is the original:
Earth911 Podcast: Ideanomics Is Building a Renewable Energy-based Transportation Infrastructure

What Happens to E-Waste When It Gets Recycled?

July 26, 2021 by  
Filed under Eco, Recycle

Comments Off on What Happens to E-Waste When It Gets Recycled?

Worldwide, electronic waste makes up more than 5% of all municipal solid waste. Commonly called… The post What Happens to E-Waste When It Gets Recycled? appeared first on Earth911.

Go here to see the original:
What Happens to E-Waste When It Gets Recycled?

RMI @ 35: A conversation with Amory Lovins

October 23, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on RMI @ 35: A conversation with Amory Lovins

The co-founder and life spirit of the Rocky Mountain Institute looks back — and forward.

Here is the original:
RMI @ 35: A conversation with Amory Lovins

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 8370 access attempts in the last 7 days.