Danish brewer Carlsberg to swap plastic 6-pack rings for glue

September 6, 2018 by  
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The Danish beer company Carlsberg is doing its part in cutting down plastic waste . The brewing company just vowed to stop using plastic six-pack rings to hold its cans together, instead opting for glue. Once the new policy is in full swing, Carlsberg estimates it will save around 1,200 tons of plastic every year. CEO Cees ‘t Hart explained how Carlsberg experimented with some 40,000 variations before settling on the perfect glue. Hart described the glue as something similar in consistency to chewing gum and says it is just as effective as traditional plastic rings. Related: A beer crisis is brewing in Germany as bottle recycling slows amid heatwaves Carlsberg plans on debuting its glue-based six packs in Norway and the U.K. before distributing them around the world. Hart would not say how much the company invested in researching the new glue. The CEO did, however, assure customers that the price of Carlsberg beer would not go up with the new packaging. Instead, the company plans on using previous cuts to help pay for the new glue. Although Carlsberg invested heavily in the new glue, the company does not own the rights to the substance and hopes that other brewers will follow its lead. For reference, the glue does not stick to the hand once the cans are separated. Each six-pack will still feature a tiny plastic handle to make it easier to carry around. The new glue is not the only way in which Carlsberg is becoming more eco-friendly. In addition to ditching the traditional plastic rings, the company is improving the technology surrounding its recyclable bottles. Carlsberg is planning on using an extra layer of protection on each bottle that will increase its lifespan. The brewer has also created a new bottle cap that keeps the beer fresher and a different type of label ink that is more sustainable. It is yet to be determined if the moves will improve sales, but Carlsberg is definitely taking steps in the right direction for the environment. + Carlsberg Via Bloomberg , The Guardian Images via Carlsberg

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Danish brewer Carlsberg to swap plastic 6-pack rings for glue

The Kind Lab creates greener toothpaste that doesn’t come in a tube

September 4, 2018 by  
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A tube of toothpaste is not the easiest thing to recycle . But what if you didn’t have to worry about recycling the tubes at all? The Kind Lab, a company based out of Los Angeles , has officially launched a zero-waste toothpaste that doesn’t come in a plastic tube. The company calls its product Bite Toothpaste Bits, and it could revolutionize the way we brush our teeth. The Kind Lab, a company started by Lindsay McCormick, makes the toothpaste tablets out of natural ingredients by hand. These plant-based components have been tested in clinical trials and performed well in both cleaning and protecting teeth. The company does not include fluoride in its toothpaste, making it safe for children to use, too. Bite Toothpaste Bits are molded into tablets and packed in a small jar. When you’re ready to brush your teeth, you simply pop a tablet in your mouth, wet your toothbrush and start brushing. The tablet dissolves into a paste as you brush and completely eliminates the need for the traditional toothpaste tube. The company has decided to go with a subscription-based approach for the Bite Toothpaste Bits, which means you can sign up for regular refills of toothpaste. The tablets currently come in two different flavors: mint and mint charcoal. The bottle is reused every month, and the refill tablets arrive in 100 percent biodegradable cellulose, which also cuts down on waste . The bits are ideal to bring along while traveling. Following a demonstration video that went viral, The Kind Lab has received so much attention that new orders can take three to six weeks to ship. Overall, the wait can be worthwhile, as Bite is an innovative solution to a growing problem of recycling old toothpaste tubes. It is estimated that people discard around 1 billion tubes of toothpaste every year, but these toothpaste tablets offer a zero-waste alternative. + Bite Via Core77 Images via Lindsay McCormick

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The Kind Lab creates greener toothpaste that doesn’t come in a tube

A prefab chapels sculptural form amplifies the landscape in Uruguay

July 23, 2018 by  
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Perched on a hilltop in a bucolic rural landscape in Uruguay, the Sacromonte Chapel is a minimalist, prefabricated structure designed to coexist with nature in harmony. Designed by Uruguay-and Brazil-based architecture firm MAPA , this sculptural place of worship is set on one of the highest peaks in the traditional Andalusian neighborhood Sacromonte and overlooks unobstructed, panoramic views of its surroundings. The building was mainly constructed from cross-laminated timber panels and steel and was assembled onsite in just one day. Crafted as a “landscape amplifier,” the Sacromonte Chapel takes cues from its surroundings — a rolling landscape of vineyards, lagoons, hills and shelters — and features a relatively simple shape that complements the environment. The chapel comprises two cross-laminated timber panels — measuring nearly 20 by 30 feet in size — angled toward one another, like a pair of hands in prayer, without actually touching. The semi-enclosed structure simultaneously creates a defined interior while remaining open to the environment. “How should the sacred spaces of the 21st century be? The chapel ponders possible interpretations of this and other questions through its ambiguous relationship with matter, space and time,” MAPA said in a project statement. “A peaceful tension reigns when in contact with it. A tension between weight and lightness, presence and disappearance, technology and nature . Enigmatic and mystifying, it leaves its visitors with more questions than answers.” Related: Provocative timber horn explores the hypnotic pull of the unknown The Sacromonte Chapel was prefabricated in a factory in Portugal and then transported to the site for assembly. The architects strived to use as few resources as possible to make a simple and austere design statement. A black metal box faced with a sheet of translucent onyx punctuates one of the timber planes and houses a statue of the Virgin of “La Carrodilla.” A slender timber cross was installed in front of the chapel. + MAPA Images by Tali Kimelman

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A prefab chapels sculptural form amplifies the landscape in Uruguay

8 Ways to Get Involved

July 12, 2018 by  
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You’ve already replaced your traditional light bulbs with energy-efficient CFLs. … The post 8 Ways to Get Involved appeared first on Earth911.com.

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8 Ways to Get Involved

This tiny cabin on the Greece-Turkey border generates 100% of its own energy

May 14, 2018 by  
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Istanbul-based studio SO? Architecture & Ideas has completed a tiny off-grid cabin perfect for reconnecting with the outdoors. Located in a village on the Turkish-Greek border, the Cabin on the Border is a prefabricated and transportable unit constructed of laminated wood and polycarbonate. As a modern take on the traditional cabin vernacular, this tiny, sustainably minded structure is equipped with solar panels and a rainwater catchment system as well as an adaptable interior design. Designed to capture the “back-to-nature” aesthetic, the 194-square-foot Cabin on the Border is set in a field of mustard greens and raised off the ground to minimize site impact . “We tried to envision the nature not only as a picturesque background but also as a protagonist of the scenes we will create,” said the architects, who cited the challenges of living with Mother Nature – including mosquitos and storms. To mitigate the ever-changing weather, the architects designed the off-grid cabin with operable facades that can adapt to different climate conditions. Related: This prefab movable house can be assembled anywhere A drawbridge-style door at one end of the cabin tilts outwards to form a patio, while the polycarbonate window can pivot upwards to form a glazed canopy, effectively opening up the living area to the outdoors. The plywood-lined interior includes three sleeping spaces—one next to the drawbridge-styled opening and the others tucked above—as well as a bathroom and open-plan kitchen, dining area, and living space. Solar panels cover the roof of the off-grid unit. + SO? Architecture & Ideas Images via SO? Architecture & Ideas

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This tiny cabin on the Greece-Turkey border generates 100% of its own energy

Lacy Flying Mosque installation changes shape depending on the viewing angle

March 9, 2018 by  
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Following their gorgeous sea urchin-inspired installation at Singapore’s iLight Marina Bay Festival, Choi+Shine Architects unveiled a new lacy design crocheted in geometric shapes that mix cultural influences of the east and the west. The Flying Mosque is comprised of architecture elements that come together to form a mosque when viewed at one angle, or an elegant collection of lacy shapes from other angles. The project reinterprets an Islamic mosque by deconstructing it into elements that form a harmonious whole or a seemingly illegible composition, depending on the viewing angle. Each element is a shape familiar in both Eastern and Western architecture. The varying views of the composition emphasize individual elements that are independent, complete and can stand alone, but can also form a harmonious single entity. Related: Dark highway underpass transformed into a brilliant tunnel of light The elements of the project sway and rotate in the wind, creating a series of kinetic patterned shadows in which viewers can immerse themselves. The geometric patterns reference the traditional Islamic arabesque. The abstract expression embodied in its repetitive, orderly and cohesive pattern signifies infinity and its quiet impact produces a meditative feeling. + Choi+Shine Architects

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Lacy Flying Mosque installation changes shape depending on the viewing angle

Reinventing Infrastructure With Digital Efficiency

October 2, 2017 by  
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Digital efficiency is a critical differentiator enabling competitiveness and growth in companies and countries. The industrial internet enables efficiency improvements that yield economic gains and environmental benefits beyond the traditional development and introduction of new technology. Leaders from GE, Intel and MWH will share insights and global examples of how embracing digital efficiency has returned costs savings, reduced emissions, and created greater productivity within their own operations and for their customers.

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Reinventing Infrastructure With Digital Efficiency

Flexible Garden Modules make it easy to build your own green wall

April 27, 2017 by  
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Architects and twin sisters Luisa + Lilian Parrado are on a mission to make it easy to add a stylish splash of green to your walls. The designers created Garden Module, a customizable modular wall system with a minimalist appearance. Made of steel tubes strung together with polypropylene string, these simple and three-dimensional wall modules can support up to two potted plants at a time and can be expanded to create a sprawling wall of green. The Garden Module was recently recognized at the 2017 European Product Design Award , where it received bronze. The modules are built of either white or black carbon steel tubes that are easily assembled into triangle formations. Each module comes with two triangular concrete bases that fit inside the steel tube frame and are strong enough to support potted plants without the need of screws. Related: Flower Tower: 380 Potted Plants Line Parisian Apartment Facade “This project was born from the necessity of creating a green wall without the complexity of the traditional one,” write the designers. “From a single module you can create a three-dimensional panel with most varied combinations. Its irregular shape allows flexible compositions according to taste, purpose and destination: aligned, mixed, spread or contained.” + Luisa + Lilian Parrado Images by Bruna Hosti

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Flexible Garden Modules make it easy to build your own green wall

Dutch farmhouse renovated as a vibrant meeting space with a hipped roof

January 30, 2017 by  
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An extensive renovation turned this historic farmhouse in the Netherlands into a vibrant meeting place that sources its food from local farms. Architecture firm Eek en Dekkers kept many of the original design features of the 1904 building, accentuating its rustic quality yet offering a series of modern amenities. The farmhouse is located in the Friesian town of Woudsend in the Netherlands . Surrounded by farms and mills, the project retains the rustic qualities of the original structure dominated by handicrafts, hipped wooden roof and brick walls. The architects kept the existing roof structure, removed the mezzanine floor, and created a large atrium that shows off the beauty of the historic roof. Related: Mid-century Dutch farmhouse gets a bold contemporary makeover Currently functioning as a meeting place , the former farmhouse sources all its food locally– the milk and meat come from Frisian cows and the flour is sourced from the village mill. + Eek en Dekkers Via Archdaily Photos by Thomas Mayer

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Dutch farmhouse renovated as a vibrant meeting space with a hipped roof

Dubuc Motors unveils Tomahawk electric sports car with a 370-mile range

January 30, 2017 by  
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Dubuc Motors just unveiled the Tomahawk – a 2+2 electric sports car that can go from 0-60 miles an hour in a zippy three seconds. Even more exciting, the car’s EPA-estimated range is a crazy 370 miles. The Tomahawk is manufactured entirely in North America, and the company reportedly spent 12 years researching and developing clean technology to create the green vehicle. Dubuc Motors ‘ Tomahawk feature sleek scissor doors, a panoramic roof, a built-in WiFi hotspot, hands-free voice commands, and a live 360 degree camera. The car is made of aluminum with a carbon fiber interior. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8SFM2YCY3B0&feature=youtu.be Related: The Immortus electric sports car can drive all day using just the power of the sun Dubuc Motors sees themselves as fulfilling a niche market; on their crowdfunding campaign on StartEngine , they describe the Tomahawk as ” Tesla ‘s cousin” and explain, “While Tesla offers a sedan and an SUV, we want to complete their product line with our sports car.” With the electric vehicle (EV) market exploding – demand could exceed 35 million units around the world by 2022 – Dubuc Motors is angling to uniquely position themselves to fulfill demand for luxury EVs. Dubuc Motors has raised over $6 million in reservations . You can’t snag one of the cars quite yet, although you can reserve one for $5,000 on their website . There they offer six colors: green, black, two tone, red, yellow, and orange. The car’s retail price will be $125,000, and the company plans to begin production this year. + Dubuc Motors Images courtesy of Dubuc Motors

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Dubuc Motors unveils Tomahawk electric sports car with a 370-mile range

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