Botswana considers lifting elephant hunting ban due to overpopulation

February 25, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Botswana considers lifting elephant hunting ban due to overpopulation

Botswana is contemplating removing an elephant hunting ban that has successfully boosted populations over the past four years. The country has seen the number of elephants increase over the years and officials believe culling is needed to prevent conflicts between the mammals and people. Experts believe there are around 130,000 elephants in Botswana, a number that has steadily grown since the country adopted a hunting ban in 2014. Although Botswana’s tourism sector has benefited greatly from the population boost, President Mokgweetsi Masisi advised ministers to re-evaluate the ban in light of overpopulation. Related: Mass poaching in Botswana leaves behind 90 tuskless elephants Officials in Botswana deliberated for months and consulted with residents and companies about the elephant hunting ban before releasing any data. The research indicated that people and organizations are in favor of lifting the hunting ban and keeping elephant populations within their traditional range. The ministers also recommended limited culling efforts in the event that the ban is lifted. “I can promise you and the nation that we will consider it. A white paper will follow, and it will be shared with the public,” President Masisi stated. Masisi added that they plan on consulting with parliament before they remove the ban and allow hunting of elephants . The president is also open to keeping the ban in place if parliamentary leaders believe it should be upheld. Proponents of lifting the ban claim that the rise in elephant populations in Botswana has led to an increase in conflict between the large mammals and humans. Farmers have also complained that elephants have been ruining crops. In some cases, the interactions between elephants and humans has turned violent, even leading to deaths. Environmentalists, on the other hand, disapprove of lifting the ban and say that better conservation efforts are needed to protect these animals . Experts also believe that Botswana’s tourism sector could take a major hit if the country starts hunting elephants again. Following its productive diamond mining, tourism is the country’s next highest source of outside income. It is unclear when officials in Botswana will initiate a plan to remove the elephant hunting ban and what the culling process will entail. Via BBC Image via designerpoint

See more here:
Botswana considers lifting elephant hunting ban due to overpopulation

This artist created a stunning art installation made from 168,000 plastic straws to encourage people to use less

February 25, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on This artist created a stunning art installation made from 168,000 plastic straws to encourage people to use less

The world produces 260 million tons of plastic every year, and 10 percent of it ends up in our oceans either degrading at a painfully slow rate or not degrading at all. Artist Benjamin Von Wong wants to send a message: The smallest action can make the biggest impact. Even something as simple as saying “no thanks” to a plastic straw. The numbers are constantly rising and soon the earth won’t be able to take it anymore. Among these troublesome pollutants is the humble plastic straw. Durable, too small to recycle and usually only used once, straws make up a huge portion of unnecessary plastic waste. Related: Volvo creates the living seawall in Sydney to help with plastic pollution Thankfully this epidemic is beginning to gain attention. With the help of volunteers, Starbucks Vietnam and Zero Waste Saigon, Von Wong spent six months gathering used plastic straws to turn into “The Parting of the Plastic Sea .” The art installation, also known as “strawpocalypse,” took over two weeks to create. To represent different parts of the wave, the straws were divided by color and connected together and formed into the flowing base, the white froth and the yellow sand. Volunteers spent hours arranging the straws to mimic paint brush strokes. Plastic bags were used to support the straws onto the structure and to act as a diffuser for the LED lighting . “The plastic problem is either out of sight, out of mind– or so omnipresent that it becomes invisible,” says Von Wong. “I wanted to use art to tackle both angles – by creating something beautiful and unique out of an environmental tragedy.” “Strawpocalypse” was truly a team effort. Along with the volunteers, Von Wong had the help of Nick Moser, a technical builder in SF, Stefan Suknjaja, an escape room designer in Serbia and Fosha Zyang, a local set designer . When it came to arranging the straws everything came together organically . Since it was difficult to predict exactly how the structure would look once finished, it was exciting for everyone when the piece finally began to come together. The piece currently resides inside the atrium at Estella Place in Ho Chi Minh City, giving viewers a chance to see “strawpocalypse” from a 360-degree angle. They also built a plastic background with a “sun” effect with LED light panels and galvanized wire to prevent distraction. The art installation is fitting, “something so large that if anybody walked by, they couldn’t help but ignore,” according to the artist. So next time you think to yourself “it’s only one straw,” just remember that eight billion other people are saying the same thing. “Strawpocalypse” will be looking for a new home starting in late March 2019, those interested can visit thestrawpocalypse.com + Von Wong Images via Von Wong

Go here to read the rest: 
This artist created a stunning art installation made from 168,000 plastic straws to encourage people to use less

New study predicts mass extinction in 140 years

February 25, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on New study predicts mass extinction in 140 years

A new study suggests that the old saying about history repeating itself is absolutely true. In this case, history repeating itself pertains to none other than the topic on everyone’s minds— extinction. Researchers believe it’s taken 56 million years for earth to face another mass extinction that can occur in as little as 140 years.  The research, released last Wednesday and published in Geophysical Research Letters , compares conditions in the Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) period with our planet’s present warming condition. Back in PETM days, carbon dioxide shot up, increasing Earth’s temperatures by 9 to 14 degrees. The tropical Atlantic heated up to approximately 97 degrees. Land and marine animals died. It took 150,000 years for the planet to recover. Related: Global warming will melt over 1/3 of the Himalayan ice cap by 2100 Unfortunately for us, carbon dioxide emissions are rising ten times faster now than they did during the PETM. Back then, wildfires, volcanic activity and methane wafting from the seafloor and permafrost were the culprits. Today, it’s down to us. Last year, emissions in countries with advanced economies rose slightly after a five-year decline. At this rate, the study predicts Earth’s atmosphere will be comparable to the beginning of PETM in 140 years, reaching a peak in 259 years. The result? Mass extinction. Philip Gingerich, the study’s author, did a literature review of previous studies on PETM and the rate of carbon dioxide buildup in the atmosphere. Based on eight studies published between 2009 and 2018, he used models to project future emissions caused by humans. Gingerich is an emeritus professor in the University of Michigan’s earth sciences department. He directed the university’s Museum of Paleontology for nearly 30 years. “[It’s] as if we are deliberately and efficiently manufacturing carbon for emission to the atmosphere at a rate that will soon have consequences comparable to major events long ago in earth history,” Gingerich told Earther. As he states in his study, “A second PETM-scale global greenhouse warming event is on the horizon if we cannot lower anthropogenic carbon emission rates.” Via Earther Image via nikolabelopitv

Read more from the original source:
New study predicts mass extinction in 140 years

Igloo-inspired glass and timber cabins offer gorgeous views in Lapland’s winter wonderland

January 25, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Igloo-inspired glass and timber cabins offer gorgeous views in Lapland’s winter wonderland

Christmas may be over, but it’s still possible to visit the home of Santa Claus, and stay in these incredible igloo-style glass cabins . Helsinki-based firm, VOID Architecture designed the wooden huts with massive heated glass panels in Lapland, Finland to give visitors a serene place to stay while exploring the winter wonderland. The resort is located in Rovaniemi, the beautiful capital of Finland, known for its picturesque winter months. According to the architects, the structures were designed to be modern takes on the traditional igloo design. The individual cabins are built out of timber with large glazed walls that slant inwards as they reach the roof’s apex. The double height walls, made out of large triple-glazed panels, create an immersive feel to the interior, creating a strong connection with natural surroundings. Related:8 cabins that are perfect for a dreamy winter getaway The interior design of the living area was designed to offer a warm and comfortable home away from home. Taking into account the extreme winter weather in the area, all of the glass surfaces are heated to allow guests to fully enjoy taking in the views from virtually anywhere. Light wood paneling and modern, yet comfortable furnishings were used throughout the guest huts to create a cozy cabin atmosphere . Each structure contains a large living space with double height ceilings, two bedrooms, a bath and kitchen. Additionally, guests can enjoy their own private sauna and outdoor hot tub located on a large terrace. Guests to the resort can enjoy the views from the comfort of their own accommodation or visit the resort ‘s large restaurant and lounge, also built with a fully glazed facade. Large sliding glass doors lead out to an expansive balcony that provides stunning panoramic views of the snowy landscape. The resort also offers plenty of activities to enjoy the amazing surroundings. + VOID Architecture Via Archdaily Photography by Timo Laaksonen via VOID Architecture

Read the original post:
Igloo-inspired glass and timber cabins offer gorgeous views in Lapland’s winter wonderland

Large scale 3D Printer capable of printing a motorcycle

December 17, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Large scale 3D Printer capable of printing a motorcycle

Just a few years ago, 3D printing capability was relatively new technology. A home 3D printer could perhaps create a single printed letter or figure if left to work overnight. Advancements in the industry have been fast and furious with new technology offering recognizably sci-fi-like options. While companies have made news with efforts to print homes for a solution to housing shortages or printed skin in the name of medical advancement, one company has created a prototype that proves transportation could be the next evolution of 3D printing. Created thanks to the advanced technology of a high-capacity printer, the NERA 3D-printed motorcycle prototype is the first fully functional model of its kind. NOWlab, the innovation department at BigRep, is the creative force behind the design. Based out of Germany, the company is putting tracks down as the world’s leader in large-scale 3D printers. Related: The world’s first 3D-printed steel bridge looks like it came from another planet The NERA was manufactured to show the potential of these printers. Note that the motorcycle is a prototype only and not for sale to the public. However, there is much to be learned from the prototype itself and it leans towards limitless potential in the industry. Components of the NERA are almost hard to comprehend when you realize that it all came out of a printer, far from the traditional production line of Yamaha or Harley Davidson. Literally from the ground up, this motorcycle has all non-electrical printed parts, 15 in all, that include tires, rim, frame, fork and seat. Not only are the parts printed, but they are stylistic and performance-based. For example, the airless tires with customized tread offer a design of strength and support. The rims are lightweight but durable, providing a smooth ride. Eight pivot joints provide forkless steering for easy maneuverability. Another unique engineering development is the lack of suspension, replaced by flexible bumpers. The Nera (N)ew (ERA) is powered by an electric engine, fitted into a customizable case. Related: This portable 3D skin printer can heal deep wounds in minutes We wouldn’t expect the company to stop driving innovation forward at any point soon with a focus on potential future uses of large-scale 3D printer capacity. “These exciting prototypes not only demonstrate the unprecedented capacity of FFF large-scale 3D printing technology in Additive Manufacturing,” said Stephan Beyer, PhD, CEO of BigRep GmbH. “They also emphasize our unique ability as the market’s innovation and thought leader to bring cutting-edge technologies from design to reality, providing an added-value market lead for our industrial customers.” + BigRep Gmb Images via BigRep GmbH

More:
Large scale 3D Printer capable of printing a motorcycle

Pinecone-shaped treehouse provides stunning 360-degree views of dense Redwood forest

December 17, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Pinecone-shaped treehouse provides stunning 360-degree views of dense Redwood forest

Suspended 60 feet above ground in the majestic red wood forest of Bonny Doon, California, this stunning pinecone-shaped treehouse was carefully crafted to let guests reconnect with nature. Designed by builder Dustin Fieder of O2 Treehouse , the Pinecone, which is listed on Airbnb , is clad in multiple diamond-shaped panels carefully layered to create the unique shape. The all-transparent facade provides guests with stunning 360-degree views of the dense tree canopy. Suspended high up in the majestic redwoods, the stunning treehouse is virtually camouflaged into the dense forest just north of Santa Cruz. Guests to the treehouse can access the gorgeous tiny treehouse via a 30 – 60 degree alternating step access ladder. However, the steepness and height of the ladder is not for the faint of heart and there is a harness and ascension safety system for those who would like to take the safer way up. Related: Cozy egg-shaped treehouses offer stunning views of the Italian Alps The entrance to the treehouse is through a trap door. Once inside, the full affect of the beautiful design is breathtaking. Multiple acrylic diamond-shaped panels were carefully crafted to create the pinecone-esque volume. On the interior, there is enough space for a double bed or two singles, both of which sit under a glass ceiling that provides the perfect opportunity to star gaze before drifting off to sleep. Guests can then enjoy the morning experience of filtered sunlight streaming through the transparent facade in the morning. A catwalk bridge leads to the bathroom, which is housed in a mini treehouse structure on the ground. The wooden interior features a hot shower, composting toilet and sink. Again, a large glass window offers expansive views of the forest, letting guests continuously immerse themselves in the incredible surroundings at every step. The Pinecone Treehouse is available to rent at Airbnb for just under $300 a night. Guests are advised to bring cold-weather gear. + O2 Treehouse Via Designboom Photography via Garna Raditya and Alissa Kolom via O2 Treehouse

Read the original: 
Pinecone-shaped treehouse provides stunning 360-degree views of dense Redwood forest

MIT develops a sustainable, mass timber-building prototype modeled after the longhouse

September 27, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on MIT develops a sustainable, mass timber-building prototype modeled after the longhouse

As sustainability measures become increasingly important in new construction, architects around the world are turning toward mass timber — even for large-scale projects. A workshop at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is dedicated to exploring the design and engineering potential of wood-based technologies and recently unveiled one such example that can even be turned into an energy producer. Dubbed the Longhouse, the mass timber -building prototype is modeled after the traditional building type of the same name that has been historically used as a place for community gatherings. Led by research scientist John Klein, the cross-disciplinary team at the MIT Mass Timber Design workshop that developed the Longhouse prototype studied how mass timber products can be used to create modern buildings. Research has shown that mass timber structures have a lower carbon footprint than their conventional building counterparts and can be engineered for substantial strength and fire resistance. Moreover, greater use of mass timber technology could lead to improved forest management and restoration. The MIT Longhouse prototype would serve as a multifunctional building that could accommodate a variety of events, from co-working, exercise classes, social gatherings, exhibitions, lectures and more. To create a flexible and open-plan interior, the building would be engineered with a series of timber laminated veneer lumber (LVL) arches that are 40 feet tall at the central peak and span 50 feet across. Each arch uses a thin-walled triangular profile and would be prefabricated in sections and then assembled on site for a fast and efficient construction process. Related: The nation’s largest timber office building is coming to Newark The building is also designed to follow passive solar principles while its sawtooth roof would allow for ample natural daylighting and could accommodate solar panels. The MIT Mass Timber Design workshop will present its Longhouse design at the Maine Mass Timber Conference this October. + MIT Mass Timber Design workshop Images via MIT Mass Timber Design

Original post: 
MIT develops a sustainable, mass timber-building prototype modeled after the longhouse

Danish brewer Carlsberg to swap plastic 6-pack rings for glue

September 6, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Danish brewer Carlsberg to swap plastic 6-pack rings for glue

The Danish beer company Carlsberg is doing its part in cutting down plastic waste . The brewing company just vowed to stop using plastic six-pack rings to hold its cans together, instead opting for glue. Once the new policy is in full swing, Carlsberg estimates it will save around 1,200 tons of plastic every year. CEO Cees ‘t Hart explained how Carlsberg experimented with some 40,000 variations before settling on the perfect glue. Hart described the glue as something similar in consistency to chewing gum and says it is just as effective as traditional plastic rings. Related: A beer crisis is brewing in Germany as bottle recycling slows amid heatwaves Carlsberg plans on debuting its glue-based six packs in Norway and the U.K. before distributing them around the world. Hart would not say how much the company invested in researching the new glue. The CEO did, however, assure customers that the price of Carlsberg beer would not go up with the new packaging. Instead, the company plans on using previous cuts to help pay for the new glue. Although Carlsberg invested heavily in the new glue, the company does not own the rights to the substance and hopes that other brewers will follow its lead. For reference, the glue does not stick to the hand once the cans are separated. Each six-pack will still feature a tiny plastic handle to make it easier to carry around. The new glue is not the only way in which Carlsberg is becoming more eco-friendly. In addition to ditching the traditional plastic rings, the company is improving the technology surrounding its recyclable bottles. Carlsberg is planning on using an extra layer of protection on each bottle that will increase its lifespan. The brewer has also created a new bottle cap that keeps the beer fresher and a different type of label ink that is more sustainable. It is yet to be determined if the moves will improve sales, but Carlsberg is definitely taking steps in the right direction for the environment. + Carlsberg Via Bloomberg , The Guardian Images via Carlsberg

More here: 
Danish brewer Carlsberg to swap plastic 6-pack rings for glue

The Kind Lab creates greener toothpaste that doesn’t come in a tube

September 4, 2018 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on The Kind Lab creates greener toothpaste that doesn’t come in a tube

A tube of toothpaste is not the easiest thing to recycle . But what if you didn’t have to worry about recycling the tubes at all? The Kind Lab, a company based out of Los Angeles , has officially launched a zero-waste toothpaste that doesn’t come in a plastic tube. The company calls its product Bite Toothpaste Bits, and it could revolutionize the way we brush our teeth. The Kind Lab, a company started by Lindsay McCormick, makes the toothpaste tablets out of natural ingredients by hand. These plant-based components have been tested in clinical trials and performed well in both cleaning and protecting teeth. The company does not include fluoride in its toothpaste, making it safe for children to use, too. Bite Toothpaste Bits are molded into tablets and packed in a small jar. When you’re ready to brush your teeth, you simply pop a tablet in your mouth, wet your toothbrush and start brushing. The tablet dissolves into a paste as you brush and completely eliminates the need for the traditional toothpaste tube. The company has decided to go with a subscription-based approach for the Bite Toothpaste Bits, which means you can sign up for regular refills of toothpaste. The tablets currently come in two different flavors: mint and mint charcoal. The bottle is reused every month, and the refill tablets arrive in 100 percent biodegradable cellulose, which also cuts down on waste . The bits are ideal to bring along while traveling. Following a demonstration video that went viral, The Kind Lab has received so much attention that new orders can take three to six weeks to ship. Overall, the wait can be worthwhile, as Bite is an innovative solution to a growing problem of recycling old toothpaste tubes. It is estimated that people discard around 1 billion tubes of toothpaste every year, but these toothpaste tablets offer a zero-waste alternative. + Bite Via Core77 Images via Lindsay McCormick

More:
The Kind Lab creates greener toothpaste that doesn’t come in a tube

A prefab chapels sculptural form amplifies the landscape in Uruguay

July 23, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on A prefab chapels sculptural form amplifies the landscape in Uruguay

Perched on a hilltop in a bucolic rural landscape in Uruguay, the Sacromonte Chapel is a minimalist, prefabricated structure designed to coexist with nature in harmony. Designed by Uruguay-and Brazil-based architecture firm MAPA , this sculptural place of worship is set on one of the highest peaks in the traditional Andalusian neighborhood Sacromonte and overlooks unobstructed, panoramic views of its surroundings. The building was mainly constructed from cross-laminated timber panels and steel and was assembled onsite in just one day. Crafted as a “landscape amplifier,” the Sacromonte Chapel takes cues from its surroundings — a rolling landscape of vineyards, lagoons, hills and shelters — and features a relatively simple shape that complements the environment. The chapel comprises two cross-laminated timber panels — measuring nearly 20 by 30 feet in size — angled toward one another, like a pair of hands in prayer, without actually touching. The semi-enclosed structure simultaneously creates a defined interior while remaining open to the environment. “How should the sacred spaces of the 21st century be? The chapel ponders possible interpretations of this and other questions through its ambiguous relationship with matter, space and time,” MAPA said in a project statement. “A peaceful tension reigns when in contact with it. A tension between weight and lightness, presence and disappearance, technology and nature . Enigmatic and mystifying, it leaves its visitors with more questions than answers.” Related: Provocative timber horn explores the hypnotic pull of the unknown The Sacromonte Chapel was prefabricated in a factory in Portugal and then transported to the site for assembly. The architects strived to use as few resources as possible to make a simple and austere design statement. A black metal box faced with a sheet of translucent onyx punctuates one of the timber planes and houses a statue of the Virgin of “La Carrodilla.” A slender timber cross was installed in front of the chapel. + MAPA Images by Tali Kimelman

Originally posted here: 
A prefab chapels sculptural form amplifies the landscape in Uruguay

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 6343 access attempts in the last 7 days.