A lakeside sauna boasts mystical views and a gleaming facade

October 29, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on A lakeside sauna boasts mystical views and a gleaming facade

Norwegian design practice Feste Landscape / Architecture recently completed the Soria Moria sauna , a sculptural, shingle-clad structure on Bandak Lake in Dalen, Norway that overlooks breathtaking mountain and water views. Developed as part of the ‘Tales of the Waterway’ art initiative for the Telemark Canal, Soria Moria is one in a series of projects that use art, architecture and lighting design to celebrate the natural beauty of the local landscape and traditions. In addition to the use of locally sourced building materials, the sauna features a wooden facade that’s integrated with gleaming golden shingles to reference local folklore. Covering an area of roughly 420 square feet, Soria Moria consists of a covered seating area, a sauna, a changing room and pine decking. Feste Landscape / Architecture found that — unlike much of the area around the lake — the Sigurdsevja inlet offered deep enough water for bathing at the shoreline. As a result, Soria Moria was elevated on stilts along the inlet and is connected to the lakeshore to the west by a long, zigzagging boardwalk that also links to an existing network of footpaths around the lake. The building takes on a striking, angular silhouette, which was inspired by the steep mountains that surround Bandak Lake. The dramatic mountains and lake are framed with massive panels of glass that blur the boundary between indoors and out. In keeping with the traditional vernacular, the structure is clad in Øyfjell Sag wood shingles that reference local building techniques. Gold-colored Nordic Royal metal shingles are also embedded into the facade to evoke the “mythical and outlandish.” Related: Floating sauna with charred timber cladding boasts minimal site impact “It also references the obvious contrast which arose between the uncultivated people of Telemark and lavish upper-class foreign travelers during the establishment of the nearby Dalen Hotel at the end of the 19th century,” the architects added. Completed this year, Soria Moria was developed by the Telemark Canal Regional Park in collaboration with Tokke municipality. + Feste Landscape / Architecture Via ArchDaily Photography by Dag Jenssen via Feste Landscape / Architecture

See the rest here: 
A lakeside sauna boasts mystical views and a gleaming facade

The peaceful Micro House serves as an artist’s refuge in Vermont

October 29, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on The peaceful Micro House serves as an artist’s refuge in Vermont

Tucked into a hilly landscape in a remote area of Vermont, a 430-square-foot tiny home holds court among the wildflowers. Designed by Vermont-based Elizabeth Herrmann Architecture + Design in collaboration with the artistic homeowner, the cabin-like Micro House is a sophisticated, minimalist structure with a design inspired by the works of Henri Matisse. Initially, the client contacted Herrmann to create his dream home set deep within the idyllic Vermont mountains; however, after much debate and a few obstacles presented by the original design, Herrmann came up with the Micro House. According to the homeowner, the inspiration behind the design comes from the work of renowned French artist, Henri Matisse. “Matisse wanted you to walk around his sculptures and be surprised [about] what would happen,” he said. “And, in a way, that’s what I wanted to have happen with my house. The house [looks so different] from the four sides and angles. It’s shocking to me and that has always made me happy.” Related: How high-tech Kasita microhomes could revolutionize homeownership At just 430 square feet, the volume is quite compact, but sculptural features including sharp angles, a shed roof and large square windows override its tiny presence. Clad in cedar panels stained a light gray, the home has a neutral tone that blends into its natural setting most days but stands out in certain seasons. The sunflower-yellow front door along with a few restrained splashes of color on the interior add a sense of welcoming whimsy to the home. The interior is an open layout, with the living and dining room defined as one space. Various square windows were placed strategically throughout to not only let in light but to frame the stunning views as if they were works of art. The windows were also specifically arranged to optimize natural ventilation and airflow in the warmer months. Locally-sourced maple flooring runs throughout the house and complements the all-white walls. In the center of the  tiny home , a small dining table sits under the large window in the living room, allowing for optimal views of the mountains in the distance. Throughout the space, similar practical features such as a built-in sofa, a small sleeping loft, a simple bathroom and attractive storage solutions give the home a serene, no-fuss atmosphere. The homeowner and guests can simply focus their attention on the incredible Vermont landscape that surrounds the Micro House. As the artist explained, “You know what’s amazing about this house? The view you get out of the different windows. You can lie in the bathtub, and when put your head [down] and look out the window, you can see the moon.” + Elizabeth Herrmann Architecture + Design Via Curbed Images via Elizabeth Herrmann Architecture + Design

More: 
The peaceful Micro House serves as an artist’s refuge in Vermont

Billions of pounds of pumpkin will go to the landfill after Halloween

October 29, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Billions of pounds of pumpkin will go to the landfill after Halloween

Over the past few weeks, millions of people have bought nutritious, tasty treats that they won’t eat, and after Halloween, the majority will end up throwing them in the trash. Of course, we are talking about pumpkins. This week, billions of pounds of the delicious, edible and versatile squash will become  food waste instead of being cooked or composted. In the U.K. alone, eight million pumpkins will be in the garbage on November 1. According to The Guardian ,  this would be enough to make pumpkin pies to feed the entire country. Nearly 60 percent of people bought their pumpkins just to hollow out and carve. The #PumpkinRescue campaign said that only one-third of those people will cook the edible insides, and just over half of them will throw away the pumpkin flesh. Related: How to cook a whole pumpkin (seeds, guts and all) More than 1.3 billion pounds of pumpkins will be thrown out in the U.S., adding tons of waste to landfills. When we throw those pumpkins out, they decompose and release methane — a harmful greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change . In Canada, the pumpkin harvest attracts thousands of people to farms all over the country for hayrides and corn mazes. But farmer Rob Galey said that most visitors to his annual Pumpkin Fest won’t take pumpkins home to cook and eat. He explained that the visitors are buying a metaphor, not food. The pumpkin represents an abundant fall harvest and looks good in a photo, but it never makes it to the dinner table. Is our pumpkin waste ruining the environment? It’s certainly an issue, but the U.S. Department of Energy is working on the problem by teaming up with industry experts to develop integrated biorefineries, which are facilities that can efficiently convert plant and waste material into affordable biofuels. As of right now, none of the refineries are in full operation. In the meantime, keep enjoying your pumpkins . Carve them, decorate them and — after October 31 — eat or compost them to reduce the food waste. Via The Guardian , Vice , Pumpkin Rescue  and CBC News Images via Corey Blaz and Marius Ciocirlan

See original here: 
Billions of pounds of pumpkin will go to the landfill after Halloween

Bad Behavior has blocked 1154 access attempts in the last 7 days.