A 1987 International School Bus is converted into a 200-square-foot home for a family of 3

June 19, 2019 by  
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Making a tiny space into a family home is no easy feat, but with a little design savvy, it can produce some seriously amazing results. Pacific Northwest-based artist Quinn Dimitroff and her husband recently converted a 1987 International School Bus into a serene, minimalist tiny home for their family of three. The interior of the tiny home on wheels is a very compact 200 square feet, but thanks to a few smart features, it seems way more spacious. The pale beige walls, white ceiling and wood-laminate flooring give the space a fresh atmosphere, which is enhanced with a few pops of color found throughout the home. Additionally, ample natural light, especially from the extra-large windshield, brightens the entire living space. Related: A 1992 International School Bus gets a second life as an adventure-mobile According to Quinn, the renovations took a full year, with the couple doing most of the work themselves . During that time, they knew that strategic storage would be the key to living clutter-free with a toddler in tow. Accordingly, storage can be found throughout the home, from the bookshelves above the windshield to the storage cabinets hung above the kitchen. The main space is comprised of a sofa that the couple built themselves and a kitchen with a full-size stove and convection oven. Next to this space is a multifunctional table that the couple uses for food prep, working and dining. Past the kitchen is the bathroom, which is surprisingly spacious with enough room for a full-sized tub, a stand-up shower and a composting toilet. At the far end of the converted bus are the bedrooms. For the little one, the couple created a vibrant little nook with enough space for her bed and toys. The master bedroom features a queen-sized bed, which Quinn refers to as her “sanctuary space.” + Quinnarie Via Apartment Therapy Photography by Jessie Bennett

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A 1987 International School Bus is converted into a 200-square-foot home for a family of 3

Tiny house in Tokyo funnels light indoors with a curved roof

June 17, 2019 by  
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After spending a decade commuting to teach at Tokyo’s Waseda University and Art Architecture School, architect Takeshi Hosaka and his wife decided to leave their tiny house in Yokohama for Tokyo, where they would build an even tinier house. Dubbed the Love2 House —the predecessor in Yokohama was called Love House—the micro-home spans just 334 square feet and is topped with a funnel-like roof to bring daylight deep inside the home. The tiny home features a minimalist and industrial aesthetic defined by its reinforced concrete structure, galvanized aluminum panel cladding, and timber accents. Takeshi Hosaka and his wife have long admired tiny homes found across history, from an Edo-period 100-square-foot home for a family of four to Le Corbusier’s 181-square-foot vacation home Cabanon. The couple followed tiny house principles preaching minimalism and a closeness with nature in designing their first micro-home, Love House, and their current home, Love2 House. The tenets for an ideal life in ancient Roman villas—study bath, drama, music and epicurism—also influenced the design of the house, which includes space for a bath, plenty of space for record storage, an old-fashioned earthen pot rice cooker and a library for books. Related: Ultra-Compact “Near House” is a Small Space Marvel in Japan Love2 House’s sculptural funnel-shaped roof was created in response to a solar study that showed that the site would be cast in shadow for three months in winter. Inspired by Scandinavian architectural solutions, Hosaka created a curved rooftop with skylights that funnel in light in winter. The open interior and the use of short concrete wall dividers let light and natural ventilation pass through all parts of the home, which is divided into three primary zones: a dining area, a kitchen area and the bedroom. “When we keep the window facing on the street fully opened, people who walk on the street feel free to talk to me,” says Takeshi Hosaka in a project statement. “It’s like a long-time friend, and children put their hands on the floor and look inside. We even pat strolling dogs from [the] dining [room]. The front street has flower bed so we enjoy it as our garden. In this house we feel the town very close. We are really surprised how pleasant to communicate with the town is!” + Takeshi Hosaka, Photography by Koji Fujii Nacasa and Partners

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Tiny house in Tokyo funnels light indoors with a curved roof

A 1989 Airstream is converted into a modern home on wheels for a family of 6

June 5, 2019 by  
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Colorado-based Timeless Travel Trailers has unveiled a bevy of stunning converted Airstreams , but its latest design is by far one of its best. Re-configuring a 30-year-old, 37-foot Airstream Excella for a family of six was challenging to say the least, but the designers came through in spades, creating a sleek, contemporary home on wheels complete with plenty of seating and sleeping space for the family. Families often dream of hitting the road in a beautiful RV, but when it comes to large families, the logistics of traveling with so many can be a headache. Thankfully, when the design team was approached by a New York family about renovating an old Airstream that would be able to comfortably hold their family of six, the Colorado-based company took the challenge head on. Related: Artist revamps dingy interior of a 1962 Airstream with vibrant florals After cleaning up the Airstream’s signature aluminum cladding on the exterior and interior, the designers went to work creating a comfortable living space. Having gutted the original interior, the team custom-built three sofas that would fit in the living space. Not only do the sofas provide ample seating, but two of the couches fold out into a full-sized bed. Additionally, there are four bunk beds in the master bedroom, two of which convert into a king-sized bed. With the sleeping and seating spaces taken care of, the designers then focused on creating special touches for the family’s needs. On the main wall of the interior, they installed a pop-up projection screen with a stereo system for the ultimate movie nights. Adjacent to the living room, the contemporary kitchen is light and airy thanks to marble veneer waterfall countertops and white cabinetry. Across the aisle, a nook was built out with a small bar that includes a wine chiller and hide-away liquor storage that lifts up from the counter at the push of a button — a perfect feature to help the adults unwind. + Timeless Travel Trailers Images via Timeless Travel Trailers

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A 1989 Airstream is converted into a modern home on wheels for a family of 6

Round, minimalist cabins with sliding glass walls take glamping up a notch

May 14, 2019 by  
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Getting closer to nature just became a little easier — and way more luxurious — thanks to these prefab, round cabins with sliding glass walls. Inspired by the tiny cabin concept, LumiPods are contemporary cocoon-like structures with charred wood cladding and a glass facade that slides open to provide a seamless connection between the interior and outdoor spaces. The LumiPods are designed as a new concept within the world of glamping . Envisioned as “cocoons of simplicity,” the round, one-room cabins were created for stressed city dwellers looking to reconnect with nature. At 183 square feet, the tiny cabins contain just a simple bedroom and bathroom. The minimalist configuration was strategic in letting guests truly enjoy nature in a simple way without sacrificing comfort. Related: Solar-powered glass PurePod cabins provide the ultimate connection with nature According to the company, LumiPods can be completely assembled in just two days on virtually any type of landscape. The prefabricated pods are comprised of two modules that are gently set into place on four screw piles. This allows the tiny structures to cause minimal impact on the installation site. Clad in a burned wood exterior, following the shou-sugi-ban Japanese tradition, the pods are rugged enough to withstand most climates. Lined in plywood panels, the interior spaces are well-insulated and come with a minimalist interior design that adds an extra touch of luxury to the glamping experience. However, the design’s most inspired feature is the curved glass wall that slides open, providing unobstructed views from almost anywhere inside the pod . The curved LUMICENE glass panels are set in aluminum frames that slide on two rails, allowing the interior to be transformed into an outdoor space in the blink of an eye. At the moment, LumiPods must be connected to electricity, water and wastewater networks, but the company is currently exploring new technologies in order to offer a totally off-grid version as soon as 2020. + LumiPod Images via LumiPod

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Round, minimalist cabins with sliding glass walls take glamping up a notch

This development offers sustainable, affordable housing and tiny homes in Colorado

May 13, 2019 by  
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The small resort-town of Telluride in the Colorado Rocky Mountains is known for its world-class skiing, remote location and, until now, lack of low-cost housing. When the tourist numbers begin to pile up during the busy season, those working in the hospitality industry at restaurants, shops and resorts are often forced to endure a long commute from the areas outside of town, where prices are cheaper. The expensive hotel rooms and vacation homes are a dream for visitors, but when it comes to lower- to middle-class workers, affordable accommodations are scarce. Architecture firm Charles Cunniffe Architects out of Aspen recently completed a low-cost option for housing just outside of central Telluride, with rents as low as $385 per person. Related: COBE unveils LEED Gold-seeking affordable housing units in Toronto The complex consists of a boarding house with room for 46 tenants, another building with 18 separate apartments and three tiny homes . You wouldn’t know by looking at it that Virginia Placer is considered low-cost housing. The architects blended the structures among the plentiful high-end resorts and expensive housing for which Telluride is known. The buildings are placed at the base of a tree-covered mountain, and the exterior is made of high-quality wooden panels and a variety of metals, including steel. The apartment building utilizes open-air stairs and wooden balconies, while the boarding house has a huge deck with mountain views and a canopy for protection from the elements. Inside the boarding house, communal lounges and two kitchens are available for tenants to use. With a focus on sustainability, the designers installed oversized windows into the apartments for passive solar and ventilation. The tiny homes across the street from the main two buildings share the same design of metal and cedar and total 290 square feet of living space per dwelling. Scoring a spot in the development is a literal win — potential tenants are chosen through a lottery. Apartments range from  $850 to $1430 a month, while a tiny home costs $700 monthly. The cheapest option for individuals is the communal boarding house for $385 per month per person. + Charles Cunniffe Architects Via Dezeen Photography by Dallas & Harris Photography via Charles Cunniffe Architects

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This development offers sustainable, affordable housing and tiny homes in Colorado

A pair of monochromatic cottages are tucked into the idyllic Canadian forestscape

May 13, 2019 by  
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An idyllic forestscape setting that lies deep within the Canadian wilderness has inspired Montreal-based firm Appareil Architecture to build a vacation home in the form of two jet-black, pitched-roofed cabins. The Grand-Pic Chalet is actually made up of two monochromatic cottages separated by a connecting wooden deck, which allows the beautiful family home to sit in serene harmony with the surrounding nature. When the homeowners tasked the Canadian firm to create a cabin that would be a welcoming space to host family and friends, the design team was immediately inspired by the building site. Surrounded by soaring evergreen trees and a rolling landscape, the designers were drawn to create a welcoming but sophisticated space that enjoys a strong connection between the home and the forest . Related: The Little House clad in black cedar is nestled among Washington’s evergreens The house is a total of 1,464 square feet separated into two cabins. The main cottage contains the living room and open kitchen area, while the smaller cabin is used as a guest house. In contrast to the black exteriors, the interiors are clad in light Russian plywood panels. The open layout is perfect for socializing, either with a large party or small family gathering. A series of tall, slender windows let optimal natural light into the interior living spaces as well as provide stunning views of the forestscape. Taking inspiration from Nordic traditions, the minimalist interior design is comprised of a neutral color palette and sparse contemporary furnishings. A simple wood-burning chimney sits in the corner to keep the living space warm and cozy. Meanwhile, the core of the design is the open kitchen, which features a large island with bar stool seating — the perfect space for catching up with friends and family. + APPAREIL Architecture Via Archdaily Photography by Félix Michaud via APPAREIL Architecture

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A pair of monochromatic cottages are tucked into the idyllic Canadian forestscape

Couple converts an old school bus into a chic skoolie for travel

May 8, 2019 by  
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When you are ready to explore the country, why not take your home with you? Sure, there are motorhomes and travel trailers to choose from. You could even pick up a Sprinter van. But for a real adventure, you could tootle about in a skoolie. If you didn’t catch the play on words, a skoolie is a converted school bus made into a tiny home on wheels . Couple Robbie and Priscilla have converted a school bus into their own travel-ready abode through a process of trial and error mixed with some frustration and a dash of luck. The couple wanted the exceptional 210-square-feet of open space that a school bus allows so they could bring along their pet cat and feel like they had more of a home than an RV. The 1998 Thomas School Bus was the inspiration that drove them forward with their plan. Related: A 1992 International School Bus gets a second life as an adventure-mobile The conversion took a year and a half to complete, with many obstacles along the journey. For example, discovering leaky windows required a complete replacement. Then, a blown gasket kept the project in park for several months. If ever there was a reward worth the labor, this homey project is it. As a result of their efforts, the couple was able to take to the road in March in a cozy, relaxed dwelling. The lengthy, flowing space is well lit with myriad windows throughout and white cabinetry lining one side. The gray laminate flooring accents the stainless steel appliances and is complemented by the cedar tongue-in-groove ceiling. Storage is tucked in several areas including beneath the raised bed, near the ceiling in the kitchen and under the couch in a sitting area. The tiny home’s unusually large bathroom features tile work alongside glass shower doors, and the bus also has two outdoor showers for convenient clean-up. Unlike most RVs, this skoolie features both air conditioning and a fireplace, which suits the couple well as they begin their trip in Canada and Alaska, planning to later hit all 48 contiguous states. + Going Boundless Via Curbed Images via Going Boundless

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Couple converts an old school bus into a chic skoolie for travel

This camper van features not just one, but two sleeping pods in its cozy interior

April 12, 2019 by  
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While most DIY van conversions end up as just one project, Oxford-based Jack Richens and Lucy Hedges took their passion for transforming camper vans into contemporary homes on wheels and turned it into a career. Their company, This Moving House , has just finished its sixth project, the Jubel Explorer, and it is a doozy. The ultra-compact space has been completely transformed into a chic adventuring vehicle, complete with two innovative sleeping nooks. Constructed on a long wheel base Mercedes Benz Sprinter, the camper van ‘s revamped interior is surprisingly modern and space-efficient. At the front of the van, the driving area has two chairs that swivel around to face a small table with a three-person bench, creating enough space for dining or working. Related: Denver-based company helps you fulfill your van conversion dreams But at the heart of this incredible tiny home on wheels is the kitchen and sleeping space. Although incredibly compact, the kitchen is contemporary thanks to a palette of matte white with wooden trim. A white resin sink sits in front of a light-gray backsplash with a two-burner stove on one side and a countertop on the other. For additional preparation space, larger countertop panels folds out from the cabinetry. Next to the quaint cooking area is a day bed tucked into the very end of the camper van. Beside this bed, a simple staircase leads up to the company’s now-signature pod bunks. Accessed by porthole-style windows, the sleeping pods come complete with fixed full-sized mattress and reading lights as well as the possibility for tailored furnishings, such as a custom mattress and privacy curtains. To keep the space clutter-free, the camper van is outfitted with plenty of storage. The stairs to the sleeping pods lift up to reveal built-in nooks, and the main bed has pull-out drawers underneath. For additional storage, there is an extra-large drawer and room for gear in the back of the van. The Jubel Explorer was also made to be semi- off-grid  with a diesel heater that keeps the interior space warm and cozy. Power comes from a 110AH and 12V electrical system, and the van also comes with a 21-gallon water tank. + This Moving House Via Curbed Photography by Tim Hall Photography via This Moving House

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This camper van features not just one, but two sleeping pods in its cozy interior

A 1992 International School Bus gets a second life as an adventure-mobile

April 11, 2019 by  
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Remodeling an old bus into a new tiny home on wheels is never an easy feat, but most times, the results are breathtaking. Such is the case with Mande and Ben Tucker’s renovation of a 1992 school bus. Renamed Fern the Bus (in honor of the main character in Charlotte’s Web), the couple renovated the 24-foot-long  skoolie themselves, creating a customized, light-filled adventure-mobile. According to the couple, the 1992 International School Bus was in great condition when they purchased it, making the DIY renovation project in front of them just a little bit easier. Their first step was to strip the exterior of all of its original elements and repaint it in a fun sea foam green. Related:A couple converts an old prison bus into a criminally beautiful tiny home The bus is just 24 feet long and 7 feet wide, which meant the couple needed to custom design and build most of the furniture. After gutting the interior seats, rubber mat flooring and the bulky heating and AC units, they got to work crafting their future living space . Mande and Ben worked on the bus conversion for about a year. The result is a beautiful tiny home, well-lit with ample natural light. Throughout the living space, the couple used both natural cedar panels and white-painted pine on the walls, giving the interior a modern cabin feel. Acacia wood floors run the length of the home. The living room is marked by two large built-in sofas with cushions that Mande hand-sewed and stuffed with the foam from the old seats. At the end of the bus is the sleeping space, which fits a full XL mattress. In between the living room and the bedroom is a compact kitchen that houses all of the basics: an under-the-counter refrigerator, an oven with a stovetop and butcher block countertops with live-edge lumber accents. Plenty of shelving and storage keeps the interior spaces clutter-free. Next to the kitchen, a mirrored closet conceals a marine portable toilet. As for the family’s energy and water needs, a 25-gallon water tank of freshwater supplies water for the faucet and outdoor shower. The bus is also equipped with a 25-gallon gray water system . A propane tank provides heat for the oven and stove as well as the tankless water heater. Another great feature of Fern the Bus is her outdoor space. The couple outfitted her rooftop with a wonderful cedar deck, which is used for hauling sporting equipment, such as paddleboards. Additionally, the space is used as an open-air lounge, with enough space to have elevated picnics or do some stargazing. As an extra bonus, four posts are perfect to hang the couple’s hammocks, making it a prime spot for nap time. + Fern the Bus Via Dwell Photography by Mande Tucker

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A 1992 International School Bus gets a second life as an adventure-mobile

The FLEXSE tiny house module is built from 100% recyclable materials

March 21, 2019 by  
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A tiny and deliciously cozy prefab  home has popped up in St. Petersburg, courtesy of local architectural practice Smart Architecture Laboratory (SA lab) . The charming compact building—dubbed FLEXSE—is the firm’s first prototype for tiny modular housing and is modeled after a traditional Scandinavian BBQ house. Designed with flexibility in mind, the FLEXSE prototype was prefabricated in a factory, assembled on-site and built entirely of recyclable materials. Defined by its organic elliptical footprint, the FLEXSE was created to accommodate a wide variety of needs. Although the architects decided to use the first prototype as an all-season grill house, they believe the unit could be adapted for use as a guesthouse, a sauna , a cafe, a shop, or for a myriad of other retail uses. Buyers will have the option to customize the building in a variety of finishes and materials. Moreover, the buyer would also have the freedom to place the building in almost any environment, whether on water or on a rooftop, thanks to the wide range of foundations that can be used to support the structure. The recently installed FLEXSE prototype in St. Petersburg measures nearly 330 square feet in size. “During winter or in a cold weather it is cozy and comfortable to cook and chill inside, while in summer the open terrace is a nice place to spend time,” the architects say in their press statement. Related: A modular classroom for environmental education pops up in a Barcelona park Topped with an angled snow-shedding roof, the tiny BBQ house is lined, inside and out, with vertical strips of wood. The minimalist interior is simply furnished with a dining table and chairs that share the space with an open grill that fills the room with a warm orange glow when in use. A large round window and the glazed doors let in natural light . + SA lab Images by Ekaterina Titenko

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The FLEXSE tiny house module is built from 100% recyclable materials

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