The Cornelia tiny house is a peaceful writer’s studio built with reclaimed wood

April 20, 2018 by  
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One of the best things to come from the tiny home  trend is the peace of living in a quiet atmosphere – which is especially important for writers. At the request of renowned children’s author Cornelia Funke,  New Frontier Tiny Homes  created The Cornelia — which is just 24 feet in length and 8.5 feet wide. Funke’s tiny house is a serene three-in-one space that can be used as a writing studio, a guest house and a library. The Cornelia’s high vaulted ceilings provide the tiny house with plenty of vertical space. Abundant windows provide plenty of natural light and stunning views of the surrounding forest. Reclaimed barn wood covers the walls and ceilings, giving the home an inviting cabin feel. A small deck is covered with a wooden awning, creating a serene spot to enjoy the outdoors. Related: Firefighter’s self-built tiny house is an earthship on wheels The designers customized the layout of the compact space  to fit Funke’s needs. High ledges span the length of both walls to provide ample space for storing books. Minimal furnishings open up the space and keep it safe from clutter. The desk, which is located under a large window, can be folded down when not in use. A small, incredibly space-efficient kitchen is located on one end of the home and the bathroom is located in a corner of the living space. The loft, which fits a king-size bed, is accessible by a movable ladder. The efficient, modern design and lush surroundings offer plenty of inspiration for the tiny home’s creative inhabitant. + New Frontier Tiny Homes Via Apartment Therapy Images via New Frontier Tiny Homes

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The Cornelia tiny house is a peaceful writer’s studio built with reclaimed wood

Airstream launches its first-ever fiberglass camper for under $50K

April 12, 2018 by  
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The makers of the iconic “silver bullet” travel trailer just launched their highly anticipated Nest travel trailer – and it’s unlike any Airstream you’ve ever seen before. Designed as a home away from home, the Nest is big on comfort and amenities but also resilient and easy to tow — making it the ideal adventure camper . Airstream’s newest trailer also marks the company’s first departure from aluminum for the world of lightweight fiberglass – and it’s available starting at $45,000. Nest offers more than just winning good looks. Created by designer Robert Johans, who was also involved in Airstream’s in-house development, Nest blends form and function in an aerodynamic semi-monocoque structure. Ski goggles inspired the shape of the wide and slightly rounded front windshield, while five additional tempered tinted windows, a skylight , and a vertical window on the doorway come together to create a nearly panoramic view and flood the interior with natural light. Space-saving techniques create a sense of roominess inside the 16-foot, 3,400-pound Nest, which manages to pack a surprising number of amenities into its sleek and minimalist interior. When the rear doorway is opened, the eye is immediately drawn to the cozy living area and views beyond the front windshield. The bathroom and storage immediately flank the entrance, followed by a galley kitchen with a two-burner stove, sink, fridge, and microwave, and finally by the primary living space in the back. Related: 10 things you need to know about living in the 2018 Airstream Globetrotter Customers can choose between two floor plans: one with a U-shaped dinette that converts into a queen bed, and another that features a permanent queen bed with a plush Tuft & Needle mattress. “There’s really nothing else like it,” said Airstream President & CEO Bob Wheeler. “Nest acknowledges Airstream’s lasting legacy, while anticipating a new potential for outdoor adventure.” Airstream’s Nest is priced from $45,000 MSRP and will be sent to Airstream dealers nationwide this month. + Nest by Airstream Images via Airstream

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Airstream launches its first-ever fiberglass camper for under $50K

7 beautifully designed tiny homes that fit big families

April 11, 2018 by  
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Who says you can’t live in a tiny house with a family? These pint-sized homes prove it’s possible to live comfortably in fewer square feet, even with children. If you never considered small-space living with kids , these well-designed tiny homes  will seriously tempt you to ditch the traditional house for a more minimalist lifestyle. 232-square-foot home fits a family of four plus their Great Dane Macy Miller of MiniMotives started building her tiny home before she knew she’d be sharing it with a family. During the process she met her partner, James, who helped her complete the house. They’ve since welcomed two children — plus a Great Dane! — and expanded the home from its initial size of 196 square feet to 232 square feet with the addition of a bedroom.  Reclaimed wood counter tops, a composting toilet  and radiant floor heating are among the sustainable features of this cozy space. Couple adapts their tiny home to welcome a baby Samantha and Robert Garlow of SHEDsistence designed and built their own 204-square-foot tiny home to live in with their cat — and then they welcomed a baby . They adapted the space to make it child-friendly with features like a loft crib and net. So far they’ve enjoyed living in their tiny house with a baby, and the small space makes it easy for the couple to keep an eye on her. Family of six lives in an airy, converted school bus Four kids? No problem. Gabriel and Debbie Mayes of The Mayes Team transformed a 2000 Thomas High Top school bus into a 250-square-foot haven. They wanted to avoid a shotgun house feel, so they designed an L-shaped kitchen to create a natural barrier between the living area and bedrooms. Big windows fill the bus with natural light . Related: Amazing camper van maximizes space with clever boat design tricks Family of four builds a salvaged tiny home for $12,000 Karl and Hari Berzins of the Tiny House Family needed to save money, so they got creative with their tiny home. For only $12,000, they constructed a 320-square-foot house using salvaged , overstock or leftover building materials . The home incorporates a kitchen sink from a neighbor; oak from a demolished home; lights and fabric from the family’s former restaurant; and insulation, windows, flooring, framing material and their stove on Craigslist . Converted light-filled bus is home to a family of five Brandon and Ashley Trebitowski of Trebventure downsized from 2,100 square feet to 240 square feet — with three kids. They converted a Blue Bird bus into a bright mobile home that boasts an open floor plan and homemade furniture. Plenty of windows fill the home with natural light, affording it a spacious feel. Camper converted into dreamy California abode for a family of five High rent prices in California prompted Dino and Ashley Petrone of Arrows and Bow to seek out an alternative residence. They decided to convert a Cougar Keystone camper into a 180-square-foot tiny home for their family. After gutting the interior, they spent $3,000 on storage solutions to avoid clutter, a custom-cut IKEA desktop and decorations from discount stores and garage sales. 10 people could sleep inside this tiny home Ready to launch into your own tiny living adventure? If you’re hesitant to build a tiny home, there are several options, such as the Traveler XL from Escape Traveler , a 344-square-foot tiny house that can sleep as many as 10 people (provided that some of those people are children!). It’s off-grid -ready, with features like composting toilets, solar panels  and battery storage . Images via The Mayes Team, © Macy Miller/MiniMotives , courtesy of Samantha and Robert Garlow/SHED tiny house , Tiny House Family , Trebventure , courtesy of Arrows and Bow, and Escape Traveler

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7 beautifully designed tiny homes that fit big families

This pop-up camper transforms any truck into a tiny mobile home in seconds

April 10, 2018 by  
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Adventure company  Fiftyten has just unveiled the Adventure Vehicle System, which lets anyone transform a pickup truck into a full-on adventure vehicle. Designed to be a universal fit for every double cab pickup truck, the innovative kit gives adventurers optimal flexibility when it comes to turning a regular truck into an expedition fortress. The three-part system includes a tray with side storage and pull-out rear drawer, a box that can be equipped with a kitchen module, and a pop-up camper that provides extra space for sleeping or extra storage. The innovative system consists of three parts: the tray, the box, and the tent. The tray replaces a traditional bed in order to provide side storage boxes and a large drawer at the rear. The box is installed over the tray and has t-slots for attaching furniture, shelves or a kitchen module, etc. A  pop-up rooftop tent fits on top of the box and provides shelter on the go. Related: The Air Opus pop-up camper inflates in 90 seconds flat Two lifelong outdoor enthusiasts, Stefan Decker and Benjamin Krenzer, designed this innovative concept. Their vision was to create the perfect setup for campers, fisherman, rock climbers, hikers, and others in order to make it easier to enjoy “nature, being outside and feeling the beautiful places of our earth.” In fact, rarely has one DIY kit had so much to offer in terms of making world exploration so simple. + Fiftyten Adventure Images via Fiftyten

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This pop-up camper transforms any truck into a tiny mobile home in seconds

This tiny house on wheels can expand to meet the owner’s needs

March 30, 2018 by  
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Owning a house no longer means you have to stay in place. This tiny house on wheels, built to withstand extreme climates, can both change locations at a moment’s notice and expand in order to adjust to specific user needs. The Tiny House Company’s newest design, named Swallowtail, can be used as a primary home, weekender, studio, extended living space, or anything in between. Post-war homes inspired the tiny house’s design – it features a butterfly roof , timber screen, plywood cladding and corrugated sheeting. The butterfly roof has an integrated box gutter and downpipe for easy connection and rainwater collection , all hidden from view beside a paulownia timber screen. Related: This huge ‘tiny house’ on wheels can fit a family of five! The location of the doors and windows maximizes  cross-ventilation , and the walls and roof are well insulated. Durable and low-maintenance cladding and flashing ensure that the house retains a watertight seal at all times. The minimal floor plan keeps the interior looking uncluttered and clean, accommodating a range of optional extras and different furniture arrangements. Owners can add storage, shelving, optional window/door upgrades and additions, awnings, a planter box, higher-end fixtures, and additional cabinetry. Basic models of the home start at around $62,500. + The Tiny House Company Via Apartment Therapy

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This tiny house on wheels can expand to meet the owner’s needs

This adventurous couple revamped an old Airstream into a dream house on wheels

March 23, 2018 by  
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Many people purchase items on eBay–but only a few decide to live in them. When Atlanta-based couple Sheena and Joe stumbled upon an old Airstream  for sale on eBay, they decided to transform it into a home on wheels perfect for avid travelers like themselves. They revamped the Airstream and had it road-ready 10 months later. The original owners intended to use the trailer as a retirement home, but their plans fell through, leaving the Airstream in storage for eight years. After Sheena and Joe purchased it, they affectionately named it Mavis and set about turning it into a mobile living space. Related: Airstream unveils new off-grid ready Globetrotter trailer The couple renovated the structure, including the plumbing and electrical work, themselves. They also included two dedicated work areas and relocated the bedroom from the rear to the front of the trailer, which receives the most sunlight during the day. They added wood accents to the walls and countertops and designed the space in a minimalist Scandinavian style. Ample storage spaces are hidden under the sofa and bed, as well as under the refrigerator. Because of the lack of space, the couple learned to make every inch count and have everything inside serve a purpose. Related: Apollo 70 Airstream trailer renovated as an amazing “green” cocktail bar on wheels Sheena and Joe have already tested the road-readiness of the trailer by traveling through the western part of the United States. They plan to continue using the trailer while traveling and, eventually, to build a small solar-powered container home , with a special place in the backyard for Mavis. + Mavis the Airstream Via Dwell

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This adventurous couple revamped an old Airstream into a dream house on wheels

Poor urban design could be at fault for Uber driverless car crash

March 23, 2018 by  
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Uber’s self-driving cars are grounded after a fatal accident over the weekend — but a Cato Institute article questions if bad urban design was really to blame. Elaine Herzberg, the woman killed, seems to have been using a pedestrian path, which the institute described as poorly designed, before attempting to cross a street. The video is disturbing and heartbreaking to watch, and our thoughts continue to be with Elaine’s loved ones. Our cars remain grounded, and we're assisting local, state and federal authorities in any way we can. https://t.co/wUfLw2nNnk — Uber Comms (@Uber_Comms) March 22, 2018 A fatal accident in Tempe, Arizona involving an Uber driverless car left in its wake questions about the safety of autonomous vehicles . But it seems “the accident could not have been prevented no matter who was in control of the car ,” according to Randal O’Toole for the Cato Institute. Related: Uber grounds all self-driving vehicles after fatal Arizona accident Herzberg was reportedly walking on a roadway median before stepping out into traffic — and the Uber car, which did have a backup driver at the wheel, didn’t even have a moment to brake. The Cato Institute shared an aerial view, seen below, of Herzberg’s probable path. In between the northbound and southbound lanes of North Mill Avenue, there’s a median strip with a paved pedestrian path. There’s a sign, seen via Google Maps , indicating no pedestrians, telling them to use a crosswalk — so pedestrians or cyclists using the trails aren’t supposed to walk over the strip. But the Cato Institute pointed out the pedestrian path saves almost two-tenths of a mile, making it a tempting alternative for people walking or biking. O’Toole was loath to blame the victim in his article, but didn’t think the car was at fault either. He said “the question that must be asked is why are there paved trails between the north and southbound lanes of Mill Avenue when there is no safe way for pedestrians to use those trails?” Via Cato Institute Images via zombieite on Flickr and Cato Institute

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Poor urban design could be at fault for Uber driverless car crash

Family of five moves from a 2,100-square-foot-house to a beautifully renovated school bus

March 14, 2018 by  
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After deciding to move out of their 2,100 square foot house, Brandon and Ashley Trebitowski spent six months converting a classic Blue Bird bus into a sophisticated mobile home for their family of five. The family relied on the principles of minimalism to create their new home, building almost all of the furnishings themselves. Although the space is a mere 240 square feet, it feels bright and airy thanks to its monotone color scheme and open floor plan. Inspired by the tiny house movement , the couple spent six months creating their new home on wheels . They began by gutting the bus and framing the living space, built out to their needs as a large family. To make the most out of the space, they made the furniture themselves, including the large sofas. The interior is a sophisticated take on minimal design, using white walls to enhance the space. They also kept the original bus windows in place to also create the illusion of space through an abundance of natural light . Related: This amazing renovated school bus is a bright, airy home for a family of six The living area is extremely warm and cozy thanks to a beautiful, wood-burning stove that sits in the corner. According to the family, the stove has kept the interior warm all winter and kept the kids busy chopping wood. The sleeping area is in the back of the bus, where the kids have bunk beds on either side of the aisle and the master bedroom is nestled into the back of the bus. Although they did most of the work themselves working within a budget, they did indulge in a few splurges such as the subway-tiled shower with a clear skylight that opens up the compact bathroom. The kitchen area is also a favorite of the family. The butcher’s block countertop stands out beautifully against the white walls, and the space is quite functional for the family who likes to cook a lot. Although some question the feasibility of moving such a large family into a converted bus , the Trebitowskis – who publish tales of life on the bus on their Instagram Page – say that their new life in the compact bus is everything that they’d hope for, “We do life together, spend more time together and experience more with one another than we did living in a large home. We love the simple life and wouldn’t have it another way!” + Treb Adventure Via Apartment Therapy Images via + Treb Adventure

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Family of five moves from a 2,100-square-foot-house to a beautifully renovated school bus

New 3D-printed house can be built in less than a day for just $4,000

March 13, 2018 by  
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One billion people on Earth lack access to adequate housing — but that could change if ICON and New Story are successful. They’ve found a way to 3D-print 600 to 800-square-foot houses for $4,000 in under one day — and they recently unveiled “the first permitted, 3D-printed home in America.” Austin , Texas can now claim the United States’ first permitted 3D-printed house. To build the house, ICON developed a mobile 3D printer called the Vulcan, which is designed to operate in conditions where power isn’t reliable and potable water isn’t readily available – like rural El Salvador or Haiti. Related: The world’s largest Delta 3D printer creates nearly zero-cost homes out of mud 3D-printing offers several advantages over traditional building methods, ICON co-founder Jason Ballard said in a statement: “With 3D-printing, you not only have a continuous thermal envelope, high thermal mass, and near zero-waste , but you also have speed, a much broader design palette, next-level resiliency, and the possibility of a quantum leap in affordability . This isn’t 10 percent better, it’s 10 times better.” New Story utilizes locally sourced materials for dwellings today, and they plan to do the same with 3D-printed houses, which will be comprised of a mortar. The charity works with local workers, and they say that traditional building methods provide around four jobs for each house. They did say the printer will probably lower that number “but local labor will still be required for aspects of communities.” How long will the homes last? New Story said “as long or longer than standard Concrete Masonry Unit built homes.” They plan to keep homes simple to minimize maintenance costs. New Story said that they’ll print the first community in El Salvador , with other locations to follow after. They’re currently raising money to fund 100 homes and the next phase of research and development – you can donate to the initiative on their website . The first family could move into their 3D-printed house in the second or third quarter of 2019. + New Story + ICON Images via New Story

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New 3D-printed house can be built in less than a day for just $4,000

The North Face unveils a geodesic tent that can withstand 60 mph winds

February 12, 2018 by  
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Known for its high-quality outdoor gear, The North Face just unveiled a dream tent designed to meet the needs of even the most intrepid camper. The Geodome 4 is a unique geodesic dome tent that’s built to withstand the harshest elements – including 60 mph gusts of wind. The North Face has a reputation for producing amazingly sturdy camping gear and clothing. This time, however, the company has created a masterpiece when it comes to tougher-than-nails tent design . The lightweight structure is just over 11 kilograms, making it easy to carry and store. For set up, it comes with just five main poles and one equator, allowing for fast and easy assembly. The interior also comes with handy internal hangars for gear storage. Related: Stay in a cozy geodesic dome at this amazing Patagonia retreat The strategic geodesic form creates enough interior room (230 x 218 cm) for four people to sleep comfortably, and with a height of of just over 6 feet, there’s enough space to stand up. The dome shape not only provides ample room, however, as the ultra-efficient shape helps the tent withstand nature’s harshest weather. The dome form helps it stand up against strong winds and the dual-layer water-resistant exterior helps to keep the tent dry in bad weather. Unfortunately, the North Face Geodome 4 Tent is only available on the Japanese market at the moment, but with some luck, will be coming to a store near you some time soon. + The North Face Via Hi Consumption

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The North Face unveils a geodesic tent that can withstand 60 mph winds

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