Flexible prefab cabin wins Volume Zeros 2020 Tiny House competition

March 8, 2021 by  
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Mumbai-based architecture competition platform Volume Zero has announced the winners of the 2020 Tiny House Architecture Competition, a call for entries that celebrate sustainability and individuality through innovative design. A jury of international architects — including jurors from U.S.-based Desai Chia Architecture and Norway’s Saunders Architecture — awarded three flexible tiny house concepts with $4,000 in total prize money and also selected 10 entries as honorable mentions.  Spanish designer Jorge Cobo won first place in the competition with his entry, A Forest for Rest, a flexible prefab cabin with a tubular steel frame that can be suspended from trees or set on light foundations. Lined with timber slats, the 19.3-square-meter tiny house fits an open-plan living space with a separated bathroom on the ground floor along with an adaptable sleeping space that accommodates up to three people on the upper floor. The prefabricated and customizable home can also be equipped with a variety of sustainable technologies, from solar panels and rainwater reuse systems to green roofs and a ground-coupled heat exchanger. Related: The top 7 amazing tiny homes we’ve seen this year French duo Dylan Morel and Dorian Bernard took second place with the Ecottage, a charming, gabled, prefab tiny home designed to operate off of the grid . Topped with solar panels and equipped with a domestic rainwater harvesting system, the adaptable unit was created to operate independently in both urban and rural settings. Plywood was selected as the main construction material for its carbon-sequestering benefits, low cost and availability. The multifunctional interior includes a ground-floor living space and a mezzanine sleeping area. American designer Tak Ying Chan won third place with Off the Walls, a concept for sheltering people experiencing homelessness in New York City’s Bushwick neighborhood. Designed with recycled materials and a painted timber structural frame, the low-cost build integrates multifunctional furnishings to make the most of its small footprint. The modular, shed-roofed units can also be decorated with street art and murals. + 2020 Tiny House Architecture Competition Images via Volume Zero

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Flexible prefab cabin wins Volume Zeros 2020 Tiny House competition

Adorable timber cabins in Chile let you glamp among the trees

February 2, 2021 by  
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In the Chiloé Archipelago in southern Chile, a hidden gem of four tiny homes awaits nature-lovers. Remotely located in the commune of Queilén, Tiny Houses Comarca Contuy is a unique retreat that offers isolation in nature, warm hospitality and unforgettable “ glamping ” — glamorous camping — in four timber cabins elevated into the treetops. These cabins were designed by Chilean architecture firm Utreras Arquitectos. Completed in 2016, Tiny Houses Comarca County was commissioned by Comarca Contuy, an entity that promotes tourism in the region through art, culture and nature-related ventures. Nestled between the Chilean evergreen trees known as coigüe, the site-specific cluster of four cabins are carefully crafted in response to the uneven topography and views overlooking the Paildad estuary. As a result, the timber cabins are elevated and located at different heights. Related: A homey, floating cabin makes for the ultimate romantic getaway in South Australia “The idea was born from creating four shelters ‘glamping’ style among the trees, looking for formality and disposition of the latter, as well as the birds’ nests, through the proposed circular windows,” say the architects in a project statement. “Each one of these four shelters has spaces to be in and spend the night, connecting each other and the rest of the place through a wooden footbridge . The different views to the exterior, the immersion in the middle of the trees and the proximity with the estuary, make it possible to feel the wind and some species of birds in a close way when entering and being on the work.” To blend the buildings into the environment, all four cabins are clad in timber and elevated on cypress foundation piles. Local coigüe wood was used for the primary and secondary structural beams, while cinnamon wood was used for partitions and trusses. Each unit is equipped with a private patio, a kitchen with an oven and a shared bathroom with a shower. The sleeping areas are located on the second floor. + Utreras Arquitectos Photography by Gustavo Burgos via Utreras Arquitectos

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Adorable timber cabins in Chile let you glamp among the trees

The Mountain tiny home comes with a skylit cedar shower

January 19, 2021 by  
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Designed and built by CoMak Tiny Homes in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, this tiny home on wheels packs a ton of cool features into a pretty small package. Apart from sustainable elements like a composting toilet and lightweight steel siding, The Mountain tiny home also boasts beautiful French doors, shiplap walls, a touchless kitchen sink faucet, and — our favorite feature — a bright, skylit cedar shower. Cody Makarevitz of CoMak Tiny Homes wanted to explore the idea of a tiny house that is cheaper and more mobile than standard tiny homes. “With the way the industry seems to be going, mansion tinys with not so tiny prices, I wanted to get back to the roots of the movement and make something a little more financially digestible for someone who doesn’t want to break the bank,” he told Inhabitat. “I also wanted to make a nice, high-quality product and livable at that size. This was the result.” Related: This tiny home on wheels features a cool laundry chute From the brick overlay under the kitchen island to the distressed barn wood beams on the ceiling, this home has plenty of thoughtful, stylish touches. The kitchen also has live edge walnut countertops, waterproof vinyl flooring and an on-demand hot water heater. Many of the materials used in the project were salvaged from other projects. On the other side of the tiny home, you’ll find a bathroom with Delta shower hardware, a Nature’s Head composting toilet (though it is also plumbed for standard toilet capabilities) and a cedar shower complete with 3-foot-by-3-foot skylight; you might just feel like you’re showering outside. Although The Mountain tiny home is built on a custom 13-foot-by-8-foot trailer frame, the shower bump and the front porch overhang bring the length to 18 feet. The downstairs square footage is just over 100 square feet with another 50 square feet in the loft. A 12-foot telescoping ladder leads to the loft , which has room for a king-sized bed and includes another tempered, double-pane skylight. + Tiny Estates Images via Cody Makarevitz

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Biden expected to cancel Keystone XL project on first day in office

January 19, 2021 by  
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Sources close to the U.S. President-elect Joe Biden indicate that he plans to cancel the permit for the Keystone XL pipeline project on his first day in office. Such reports have been causing unrest in Canada, with some leaders warning that if the project is canceled, there could be a diplomatic row between the two countries. According to a  report published  by Canadian Broadcasting Corp. (CBC), the words “Rescind Keystone XL pipeline permit” appear on Biden’s to-do list on his first day in office. The Keystone XL pipeline project was proposed to develop a pipeline that would move oil from Canada to Nebraska. But since the start, the project has been opposed by environmentalists, leading to several revisions. Opponents of the project say that the pipeline will be a major contributor to climate change and may show the country’s unwillingness to move away from an oil-based economy. Related: Federal judge blocks the Keystone XL Pipeline According to Canada’s ambassador to the U.S., Kirsten Hillman, the project would be beneficial to both the U.S. and Canada. Hillman said that she will continue to promote the project so long as it offers benefits for both countries. “There is no better partner for the U.S. on climate action than Canada as we work together for green transition,” Hillman said in a statement. According to Alberta Premier Jason Kennedy, canceling the project would kill jobs and weaken U.S. security, because the country would have to depend on OPEC oil imports. However, those opposed to the project have said that Alberta, the source of the oil , would be the biggest beneficiary in the project and that the pipeline would worsen climate change. In Canada, construction is underway, with the international border crossing already complete. The company in charge of the project, TC Energy Corp., has claimed that it will achieve net-zero emissions by 2023. However, critics do not subscribe to the narrative, given that the pipeline itself will be supplying oil. The project was approved in 2017 by the outgoing President Donald Trump . However, the pipeline had initially been rejected by the former U.S. President Barack Obama. Following its approval in 2017, various environmental groups moved to court, slowing the progress of the project in the U.S. Via Reuters and CBC Image via Chesapeake Climate

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A micro-house offers a formerly homeless resident both privacy and connection

January 15, 2021 by  
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Austin-based Mckinney York Architects has completed its second micro-house for the Community First! Village , a program by Mobile Loaves & Fishes to uplift people experiencing chronic homelessness in Austin with affordable, sustainable tiny homes. As with the firm’s first project for the community, Mckinney York Architects teamed up with Bailey Eliot Construction to design, underwrite and build a permanent new home for a Community First! resident. Located 20 minutes east of downtown Austin , the two-phased Community First! Village is a transformative residential program with 51 acres of affordable, permanent housing and community for residents who were formerly homeless. The first phase of the program kicked off with Tiny Victories 1.0, a 2014 design competition hosted by AIA Austin and Mobile Loaves & Fishes that invited firms to design minimalist and sustainable one-person shelters no larger than 200 square feet. In fall 2018, the program moved forward with Phase II by adding 24 more acres of development for a total of over 500 tiny homes along with new amenities such as community gardens, outdoor kitchens and a welcome center. Related: Community First! provides affordable, permanent micro-housing Building on its experience with Phase 1 Tiny Victories, Mckinney York Architects began the Tiny Victories 2.0 project by speaking with current and future Community First! Village residents to determine design needs. The firm was assigned to design a custom tiny home for a “Seed Neighbor,” a woman who lived in Phase 1 of the development and would be “transplanted” to Phase II. In working closely with the client, the architects crafted a home that respected her desires for privacy without compromising a sense of community. For example, instead of large windows, the architects installed a screened porch in the front corner of the home that can be opened up to the neighborhood or closed off when more solitude is desired. The tiny house is topped with a butterfly roof that harvests rainwater for irrigating the garden, and the cozy interior is lined with knotty pine paneling. + Mckinney York Architects Photography by Leonid Fermansky via Mckinney York Architects

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A micro-house offers a formerly homeless resident both privacy and connection

Tiny mobile dwelling celebrates local Shinshu larch in Japan

October 9, 2020 by  
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In only three months, eco-conscious Japanese architect  Tono Mirai  crafted a charming tiny timber structure that can be moved by truck. Dubbed the Red Container, the compact building was primarily designed as an exercise to promote Shinshu larch, a beautiful local larch species in the Saku area of Japan’s  Nagano Prefecture that had long been overlooked because of its tendency to warp and twist. However, due to advancements in drying technology, says Mirai, Shinshu larch can now easily work in construction projects — as demonstrated by the stunning Red Container project. Designed over the course of half a year and constructed in just three months, the minimalist Red Container dwelling can be moved by a four-ton truck. The prototype building, which measures just under 10 square meters (107 square feet), can adapt to a variety of functions, from a small mobile store to a  tiny house , and can be custom made to order. The working prototype includes electricity, light fixtures and air conditioning, while its large operable windows facilitate natural ventilation.  Larch  features prominently in the build — the project name is a nod to the natural reddish tones found in Shinshu larch — and shows up in the structural frame’s beams and columns as well as the walls, eaves and furnishings. The wood is left exposed so that users can appreciate the natural grain and craftsmanship from the local carpenter who used local, traditional methods to construct the timber interior.  Related: This rammed earth passive house in Japan is shaped like a shell “In addition, a new blue larch that tends to give a dark and smooth impression, I tried a different expression such as blue material (color change material due to fungi) that is not normally used as the floor material, and 30 mm wideness larch material with unevenness is used to the inner wall,” Mirai explained in a statement. He also added an accent wall to the interior built of  clay  sourced from the local Kita-Aika village in Nagano. A twisted asphalt shingle roof tops off the building. + Tono Mirai Photos by takeshi noguchi

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This tiny home on stilts features an awesome secret patio

August 25, 2020 by  
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Known as LaLa’s Seaesta, this 410-square-foot tiny home located just blocks from the beach features reclaimed wood and a secret hidden patio. The home, designed by Texas-based Plum Construction, takes full advantage of its small stature with a dining nook that converts into a sleeping area and a swinging bed made from salvaged wooden doors. In addition to the 410 square feet of main living space, there is also an 80-square-foot interior loft accessible by ladder. The ladder to the loft was designed and built by Christine of Plum Construction and includes a closed system to stop it from falling and keep it flush against the wall while not in use. Christine also built and installed the beautiful wall treatment in the main bedroom that is made of old beadboard salvaged from a 100-year-old building in downtown Galveston. Related: This gorgeous tiny home features a greenhouse and wooden pergola The exterior is painted in a bold black hue, while the inside is soft pink, adding a unique contrast of tones. Inside, the dining nook and ottoman utilize custom upholstery, and the full kitchen contains custom Carrara marble countertops and a vintage-style refrigerator. This dining nook easily converts from a sitting area to a full-sized bed. The contemporary sofa, the centerpiece of the living room, was given a second life through reupholstering. Local artwork from a Galveston artist adorns the walls throughout the home, and the patio section has a painted mural inspired by a Brooklyn graffiti wall. The gable decoration in the front of the house is constructed from reclaimed cypress wood from a nearby house that dates back 120 years. The real hidden gem in this tiny home is the large patio underneath. It provides the occupant with a fun, bonus hangout space with ventilated slatted walls. The patio comes complete with several swings, a hammock, a bar, an outdoor shower for rinsing off after the beach, a sitting area, electrical outlets for a fan or watching TV and, of course, the lovely swinging bed made from two salvaged doors. Century-old reclaimed wood was also used in the construction of the bar and swings. LaLa’s Seaesta is available for rent on Airbnb . + Plum Construction Images via Plum Construction

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This tiny home on stilts features an awesome secret patio

The prefab Tiny Tetra House in Bali is made of recycled waste

August 24, 2020 by  
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Launched by Stilt Studios, the Tiny Tetra House in Bali is a small, prefabricated home that makes use of recycled waste materials, wood and glass for construction plus an elevated base for minimal site impact. Tiny Tetra House has 688 square feet of space with a diagonally oriented floor plan. It is elevated 40 centimeters off the ground via point foundations in order to help blend the structure into the surroundings. There is a bedroom, en suite bathroom, open kitchen, living room and outdoor terraces. Apart from the sustainable advantages of the recycled elements used in construction, the materials also act as an artistic reflective agent. Related: The FLEXSE tiny house module is built from 100% recyclable materials “At Stilt Studios, we believe we have the responsibility for both creating unique designs and reducing the environmental impact of our buildings,” said Alexis Dornier, co-founder and chief designer at Stilt Studios. “How about if we could not only reduce total material used and the footprint, but be a part of the circular economy by the choice of material used.” Bali’s waste recycling problem is similar to many places around the world, as most of what gets thrown away doesn’t end up getting recycled. The studio hopes to use this project as an example of contributing positively to the local community and the circular economy. The roof and walls of Tiny Tetra House are made of recycled Tetra Pak beverage cartons, with panels made of 25% plastic and aluminum provided by Eco Bali Recycle. This aluminum layer ensures 100% waterproofing and is proven to be more insulating and noise-reducing than common tin sheets. The contemporary sloping design of the roof helps channel rainwater to be stored for garden irrigation, and facade panels provide cross-ventilation for natural temperature regulation. The first prototype is set to be built this August, with sales starting to open up by October. Those interested can check out the project’s Kickstarter page, which Stilt Studios is using to increase community feedback. Supporters of the project can purchase a voucher to stay at the Tiny Tetra House in Bali once it is built. + Stilt Studios Images via Stilt Studios

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The prefab Tiny Tetra House in Bali is made of recycled waste

This tiny house is insulated with cork and powered by solar

August 10, 2020 by  
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Eco-friendly company The Tiny Housing Co. has added The Natura tiny home to its portfolio of unique designs. The tiny house is powered by 1000W solar panels and built out of natural materials such as cork and wood, making it sustainable from the inside out. Starting at just over $65,000, the design of The Natura is aimed at being as sustainable as possible. The company already includes solar paneling with all of its homes, but it also offers an additional “eco” package with 2000W solar panels and a wood-burning stove. The improved panels mean that occupants can generate enough power to run appliances solely from solar, and the wood-burning stove is connected to underfloor heating to reduce heating costs when coupled with the already-installed efficient insulation. Related: Solar-powered cork house pursues healthy, sustainable living Wood paneling makes up the exterior, while the facade features a thick corkboard layer to create a breathable, fire-retardant area near the loft-style, king-sized bedroom. The organic aesthetic of the exterior is complemented by the inside, which is complete with luxurious modern fixtures, soft tones and natural light. Clean water is filtered from an under-sink system, and energy-efficient appliances help keep utility costs down. As is essential in a minimalist home, there are plenty of space-saving features as well, such as hidden storage under the stairs, between the walls and under the bed. Tight insulation is achieved in the walls, floor and roof using rockwool, lightweight XPS boards and cork. Rockwool is a rock-based mineral fiber usually composed of volcanic basalt rock and recycled steel or copper byproduct, and XPS boards (or polystyrene) does not result in harmful waste with its manufacture. According to the company, these materials can also help reduce harmful VOCs and other chemicals that can come with more common home insulation. + The Tiny Housing Co. Images via The Tiny Housing Co.

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This tiny house is insulated with cork and powered by solar

This tiny home on wheels features white shiplap walls

June 11, 2020 by  
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The Heritage  tiny home  by Summit doesn’t sacrifice style for convenience. It features a spacious loft bedroom, a bay window bump out of the living room and a galley kitchen with white shiplap walls. This tiny house is designed for full-time living and comes in two sizes, the 24-foot Heritage and the 28-foot Heritage. Each model comes move-in ready with $6,000 to $8,000 worth of built-in upgrades, coming to a total of $69,999 and $78,500 respectively. The models are built on a trailer with a two-foot bay window that extends over the edge, two large  skylights  over the bedroom loft and a living room filled with windows to allow ample natural light. Related: A tiny home on wheels with brilliant interiors and two lofts can be yours for $56K The kitchen comes with a 24″  farmhouse  sink, gas stove, quartz counters, a full-size refrigerator, shelving units for a pantry and an off-grid 20″ propane range hood. Since the tiny homes are made-to-order, buyers can customize everything from the exterior color and storage options to updated kitchen appliances and washer/dryer combinations. The 24-foot Heritage provides 220 square feet of living space, while the 28-foot Heritage offers 250 square feet. Designers offer upgraded premium options for sustainability features as well, such as  solar panels , rainwater collection and a composting toilet. Stylistically, the Heritage features a modern-meets-rustic aesthetic, with its bright white shiplap and numerous windows that capture the feel of a larger family home on a smaller scale. The kitchen’s butcher block countertops, soft close shaker cabinets, 24″ fridge-freezer combination and the potential for a washer/dryer combo provide modern creature comforts with all the convenience of a  home on wheels . For storage, the staircase comes with built-in compartments, and there is a 28″ storage closet with rod and shelf (34″ in the larger model). The bathroom has a built-in vanity and shelving, with either a 48″ shower with glass door for the smaller model, or a 60″ tub and shower combo in the larger model. There is also a standard flushing toilet below the bathroom window and upgraded black fixtures throughout. + Summit Tiny Homes

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