A rare ‘Bambi’ Airstream trailer becomes a stunning mobile office

February 14, 2019 by  
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When a busy tech entrepreneur contacted San Francisco-based firm Edmonds + Lee Architects to create a mobile office that could keep him on the road, they turned to an American classic, a shimmery Airstream. After searching for a year for just the right trailer, they found a 1960s Airstream Bambi II and converted it into a brilliant 80-square-foot office on wheels, lovingly renamed Kugelschiff (German for “Bullet Ship”). The architects worked closely with the client Jeff as well as his daughter Alaina, an industrial designer who is a proponent of sustainable design, to meet his specific needs. The first step was finding a trailer that would be a good fit with Jeff’s active lifestyle. To make his working time as convenient as possible, the mobile office had to be fully connected so he could be in touch from any location, no matter how remote. Related: Airstream launches its first-ever fiberglass camper for under $50K After a year of searching, the team came upon a surprising find, an incredibly rare Airstream Bambi II. Airstream produced only one of these models a year during the 1960s, making it one of the rarest trailers in the world. Once in Jeff’s hands, the architects got to work renovating the old model . Still in good shape structurally, they set about creating a space that would work as both an office and a retreat. Clad in all-white walls, ash wood floors and oak cabinetry, the interior living space is bright and minimalist. The furniture in the Airstream is flexible to add space to the compact interior. Using a puzzle method, the designers custom-made furniture with dual uses. For example, one end of the interior is outfitted with a wrap-around sofa that goes from dining space to meeting space in the blink of an eye. The kitchen is equipped with a hidden sink and refrigerator that can be concealed into the wall. Even the main working desk gets pushed down into a bed, which sits next to a large window that allows natural light to filter into the trailer. Additionally, the Airstream conversion included a number of energy sources, such as solar power. However, with Jeff’s need to be connected at all times, the power also runs on traditional DC batteries. It has both a Wi-Fi repeater and a cellular booster, so he’s always connected, no matter where he may be parked. The home device company Nest help set up the rest of the trailer’s smart home products, which are all controlled by Google Home. + Edmonds + Lee Architects Via Dezeen Photography by Joe Fletcher via Edmonds + Lee Architects

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A rare ‘Bambi’ Airstream trailer becomes a stunning mobile office

A dilapidated garage transforms into an industrial-chic micro home

February 13, 2019 by  
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Vilnius-based IM Interior has proven once again that great design doesn’t need a lot of space. The architects recently revamped an old garage in the Lithuanian capital into a stunning micro home clad in a weathered steel. The 226-square-foot space was also completely made-over with a warm birch wood interior cladding and recessed lighting to create a modern and comfortable living space. While many critics argue that micro housing is not a feasible solution to soaring real estate prices around the world, the micro home trend continues to grow, much to the delight of minimalists. Regarding IM Interior’s recent project, founder Indr? Mylyt?-Sinkevi?ien? explained that the inspiration behind the micro garage was to demonstrate another way of life. “I wanted to show how little a person needs,” he said. Related: Stunning micro home features reclaimed materials and large garage door for entertaining Located in the Lithuanian capital, the ultra tiny home was really built from nothing but a skeleton structure. Connected to a dilapidated building that had been vacant for years, the corner garage was a forgotten piece of property. To breathe new life into the space, the architects clad the compact structure in weathered steel . They also added new windows and a new door to convert the empty garage into a truly comfortable home. Although the weathered metal exterior gives the design a cool,  industrial vibe on the outside, the interior living space by contrast is bright and airy. The living area, dining room and bedroom are all located in one open layout. Two large narrow windows, one over the bed and the other in the kitchen, frame the urban views. Recessed lighting was installed throughout the home, which is clad in warm birch wood, to create a soothing atmosphere. To maintain a clutter-free interior, custom-made furniture provides plenty of concealed storage space. Sitting under the large window, the bed pulls double duty as a sofa , which is also surrounded by built-in storage. Additional seating is found in the hanging wicker chair, adding a bit of whimsy to the design. Like most of the living space, the kitchen is clean and minimalist  but was built with plenty of counter space. The bathroom, although quite compact, features triangular black and white tiling, further lending to the modern aesthetic. + IM Interior Via Dezeen Images via IM Interior

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A dilapidated garage transforms into an industrial-chic micro home

This aerodynamic tiny home embraces flexible indoor-outdoor living

January 10, 2019 by  
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As anyone in the tiny home community knows, space comes at a premium. Most tiny home inhabitants also love to look for ways to incorporate nature and the outside world into their living space. French tiny home builder Ty Rodou has made this goal easier with the release of the Ty Bombadil tiny home. This tiny house offers a breezy outdoor feel along with a very desirable feature — an additional deck to provide ample  outdoor living space. Of course, there is no reason to escape the indoor space, designed with style and functionality in mind. Starting in the kitchen, the Ty Bombadil features an expandable table that folds into the wall when not in use and built-in drawers for storage. The streamlined kitchen offers plenty of counter space, a cooktop stove, a small refrigerator, a sink with drainboard and a unique, rustic shelving area. Related: Stunning micro home features reclaimed materials and large garage door for entertaining A removable ladder mounts to the wall when it isn’t being used to lead up to the loft, which incorporates lift-top storage bays in an L-shaped design around the edge of the space. The outdoor theme is carried throughout the tiny home with branch-shaped handrails at the loft entrance and in the shelving designs. Looking down onto the multi-use living room/bedroom area, you can see the built-in bed or couch frame with pull-out storage drawers below and bed-to-ceiling shelving up the wall along with built-in cabinets above. The small bathroom continues the all-wood decor with a framed-in composting toilet and tower-shaped support for a wooden bowl sink. Related: Off-grid tiny home with beautiful undulating roof was almost entirely built with reclaimed materials The space is bright with several large windows, double doors and an airy feel. In fact, the entire curved design facilitates aerodynamic transportation. + Ty Rodou Via Tiny House Talk Images via Ty Rodou

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This aerodynamic tiny home embraces flexible indoor-outdoor living

Endangered bluefin tuna sold for $3.1 billion to sushi tycoon

January 10, 2019 by  
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A recent predawn auction at Tokyo’s new fish market brought a record-breaking bid for the endangered bluefin tuna. Sushi tycoon Kiyoshi Kimura, who owns the Sushi Zanmai chain, paid $3.1 million for the enormous fish, more than double the price from five years ago. Kimura’s Kiyomura Corp has won the annual action in the past, but the high price of the tuna this year definitely surprised the sushi king. Nonetheless, Kiyomura says: “the quality of the tuna I bought is the best.” The 612-pound (278 kg) tuna was caught off Japan’s northern coast, and the auction prices this year are way above normal. Normally, bluefin tuna sells for about $40 a pound, but the price has recently skyrocketed to over $200 a pound, especially for the prized catches that come from Oma in northern Japan. The biggest consumers of the bluefin tuna are the Japanese, and the surging consumption of the fish has led to overfishing which could result in the species facing possible extinction . Stocks of Pacific bluefin have plummeted 96 percent from pre-industrial levels. “The celebration surrounding the annual Pacific bluefin auction hides how deeply in trouble this species really is,” said Jamie Gibbon, associate manager for global tuna conservation at The Pew Charitable Trusts. However, there have been some signs of progress when it comes to protecting the bluefin . Japan and other governments have endorsed plans to rebuild the stocks of Pacific bluefin, and the goal is to reach 20 percent of historic levels by 2034. Last year’s auction was the last at the world famous Tsukiji fish market. This year, it shifted to a new facility which is located on a former gas plant site in Tokyo Bay. The move would have happened sooner, but was delayed repeatedly over concerns of soil contamination. Via The Guardian  Image via Shutterstock

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Stunning micro home features reclaimed materials and large garage door for entertaining

December 24, 2018 by  
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One of the best advantages to building a tiny home is the ability to custom design the space. When Chattanooga-based tiny home builders  Wind River Tiny Homes were approached by a couple with a strong love of outdoor hobbies, they knew that design had to reflect their active lifestyle. The result is a 650-square-foot house that includes several unique features such as a large garage door that opens up to an outdoor deck, a vertical green wall  and a battery charger for their training bikes. The exterior of the tiny home  is clad in Eastern cedar siding with light blue wood panels and corrugated metal. The aesthetic is fresh and modern, giving the tiny home just as much charm as any larger, more conventional home design. Related: Tiny homes made of concrete pipes could be the next big thing in micro housing The interior of the home, however, is where the design really shines. According to the team from Wind River Tiny Homes, the couple wanted a home that was no more than 600 square feet. In the end, the home measures a total of 650 square feet thanks to space-efficient measures such as putting the bathroom under the stairwell. Additionally, the homeowners wanted to have a space for entertaining. Accordingly, the designers installed a custom glass garage door that leads out to a 150 square feet deck. This unique feature not only floods the interior with natural light , but allows ample space for entertaining. Using mainly locally-sourced and reclaimed materials , the tiny home team custom designed the living space for the couple’s love of all things sporty. The living space was equipped with ample storage for sporting equipment such as space for the couple’s paddle boards, a carport with a pulley system for lifting kayaks off the car and a battery charger for their training bikes. The design team also used a number of reclaimed materials in the interior accents. In one corner of the living space, a beautiful Shou Sugi Ban barn door slides open to reveal a wall of reclaimed tongue-and-groove wainscoting that was reclaimed from an old elk lodge building in Chattanooga. Further into the living space, a fully-equipped kitchen features a bar made out of of the same reclaimed wood. The kitchen’s custom concrete counter top features inlaid bike gears on the bar’s countertop, another nod to the couple’s love of biking. In addition to the unique custom attributes, the home is also equipped with a number of energy-efficient features . The deck lighting is powered by solar power  and LED lighting is used throughout the home. A smart thermostat provides the home with a comfortable temperature year round, all while saving energy in the process. + Wind River Tiny Homes Via Dwell Images via Wind River Tiny Homes

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Stunning micro home features reclaimed materials and large garage door for entertaining

Olson Kundig breathes new life into former RV campground with low-impact huts on wheels

December 21, 2018 by  
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Seattle-based firm Olson Kundig has revamped an old RV campground in Washington’s Methow Valley with a series of wooden huts. According to the architects, the design for the Rolling Huts, which have just 200 square feet of living space, was inspired by Thoreau’s simple cabin in the woods. The minimalist cabins are set on wooden platforms supported by large wheels in order to reduce impact on the landscape . After closing down permanently, the former RV campground was left vacant for years to let the landscape return to its natural state. Now an expansive meadow filled with natural grasses and wildflowers, the area is the perfect spot for a peaceful retreat. Unfortunately, zoning restrictions prohibited permanent structures from being built on the site prompting the Olson Kundig team to come up with an ingenious solution: putting the huts on wheels. Related: Floating Olson Kundig home makes way for Washington wildlife The six huts were designed to be not only low impact , but also low maintenance. Essentially steel boxes clad in plywood and car-decking, the cabins are set on wooden platforms, which are supported by four wheels. The interior finishes include simple, inexpensive materials such as cork and plywood, which were chosen for their durability. Inside the 200-square-feet tiny cabins is a serene living space with seating that faces out to the north to provide stunning views of the mountains. Clerestory windows, wrap around the walls, letting in optimal natural light. The large double-paned sliding glass doors open up to a large covered deck. The six huts are all orientated to the best views of the mountains so that guests can have unobstructed views of the incredible surrounding nature. According to lead architect Tom Kundig, the cabins were designed to let people disconnect and enjoy nature, “Here, you can hear the silence; here, there exists a great escape from daily life.” + Olson Kundig Via Dwell Photography by Tim Bies, Chad Kirkpatrick and Derek Pirozzi

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8 cabins that are perfect for a dreamy winter getaway

December 21, 2018 by  
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Are you ready for a winter getaway to a cabin in the woods? From cozy, off-grid abodes to modern, majestic dwellings that pull out all the stops, there’s a serene cabin waiting for you somewhere. If you are dreaming of a little rest and relaxation during these colder months, here are some cabins that offer a little taste of a true winter wonderland to inspire your next winter vacation. Blacktail Cabin Located on the shore of Flathead Lake in Montana, Blacktail Cabin is a beautiful, spacious vacation home that looks like a ski lodge and is filled with amenities. There is a fully-equipped kitchen, a floor-to-ceiling brick fireplace and a dining room featuring a wood-burning stove. During the winter, the Blacktail Mountain Ski Area is nearby, so guests can enjoy some skiing and snowboarding. Gubrandslie Cabin The solitary Gubrandslie Cabin is made from prefabricated solid wood panels and features views of a snow-covered landscape. It is located near Jotunheimen National Park, and the 1,184-square-foot home can withstand the cold weather and elements while leaving minimal impact on the landscape. The architects researched the local climate and geography and used wind studies to come up with the L-shape design that mimics the slope of the landscape. The roofs are slightly slanted, so the wind and snow can blow over the cabin. It is integrated deep into the terrain to protect the structure from the elements. Shangri-la Cabin The first in a series of mountain cabins in Las Trancas, Chile, Shangri-la Cabin is a geometric cabin covered with timber both inside and out and complete with large windows for picturesque views. With the look and feel of a treehouse , this cabin has a sharply pitched roof to shed snow and has high-performance insulation to keep out the cold. The 485 square feet of space spans three split-levels. Cabins By Koto Prefab housing startup Koto has introduced a series of tiny timber cabins that embrace indoor-outdoor living and a connection with nature. They have a minimalist design inspired by the Nordic concept friluftsliv, which means “free air life.” The modular cabins come in different sizes, and the medium-sized option features a folding king-sized bed, a wood burning stove, a small kitchenette and an outdoor shower. Johnathan and Zoe Little founded Koto earlier this year. Koto is a Finnish word that means “cozy at home,” and the company’s goal is to create nature-based retreats out of eco-friendly materials. Malangen Cabins The Norwegian firm Stinessen Arkitektur has built a cluster of wooden cabins that are the perfect weekend retreat for ultimate relaxation. The private vacation home is located on the Malangen Peninsula overlooking a beautiful fjord, and the individual cabins are connected with “in-between” spaces that have concrete floors and wood-slatted ceilings. There is also a central courtyard that connects the main building and annex. The covered courtyard features an outdoor kitchen and a fireplace, and the architects said that it provides an additional layer to the natural ventilation during the summertime as well as on windy and rainy days. Lushna Cabins Located in the Catskills, the Eastwind Hotel is a 1920s bunkhouse that has been converted into a boutique hotel accompanied by tiny cabins . Designed with outdoor enthusiasts in mind, there are tiny A-frame huts on the property to give guests an off-the-grid experience while enjoying the Windham Mountain area. The Lushna Cabins are 14 feet by 14 feet, and they are insulated to withstand the seasons. Each cabin has a single window, so guests can enjoy the natural light and incredible views. They are equipped with a queen-sized bed that has top-of-the-line linens and a wooden chest for storage. The cabins also provide camping kits and grilling equipment for the fire pits. Into the Wild Into the Wild  from Slovakian architecture studio Ark Shelter is an off-grid cabin that embraces the outdoors thanks to the large walls of glass on all sides. It also offers modern comforts like a kitchen, bathroom and bedroom space with a concealed Jacuzzi. It also has solar panels and a rainwater collection system for off-grid living. Kanin Winter Cabin Made from timber and aluminum, the Kanin Winter Cabin is a modern structure perched on a ledge in the Julian Alps on the remote Mount Kanin with stunning 360-degree views of Slovenia and Italy. But you can only access the cabin by air or climbing. The tiny cabin has three main areas: the entrance, a living area and a resting area with three raised surfaces for sleeping. It can accommodate up to nine mountaineers. Images via  Vacasa , Rasmus Norlander and Ragnar Hartvig / Helen & Hard Architects, Magdalena Besomi and Felipe Camus / DRAA,  Joe Laverty  / Koto, Steve King and Terje Arntsen / Stinessen Arkitectur, Eastwind Hotel & Bar, Jakub Skokan and Martin T?ma / Ark Shelter, Janez Martincic and Ales Gregoric / OFIS Arhitekti

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8 cabins that are perfect for a dreamy winter getaway

Strategically slanted walls squeeze extra space out of a small guesthouse

November 9, 2018 by  
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Strict building restrictions often dictate the design of home additions, but in certain cases, savvy architects know just how to work around them. Case in point is architect Nicole Blair, head of Austin-based Studio 512 , who has just unveiled The Hive guesthouse, a tiny home that expands as it rises upward, evoking the shape of a beehive. Built as a guest house for a residence in Austin, The Hive’s unusual shape is a solution to local building codes that required that the footprint of structure be confined to a maximum of 320 square feet. Not one to be limited by such regulations, architect Nicole Blair found a smart way to abide by the rules while still creating a gorgeous extension. Inspired by the shape of a beehive, Blair simply added a second story using walls that slant upward and outward from the base. This way, the walls expand as they rise, providing extra space to the second floor. Related: This swanky desert guesthouse was fashioned out of a former horse barn Clad in large cedar shake siding  repurposed from old roofing material, the charming tiny home with a very unusual shape is certainly eye-catching. The dramatically slanted walls and large windows framed in white add a touch of fairytale whimsy to the dynamic design. From the tilted kitchen walls to the spacious, angular bathroom to the sloping bedroom, the structure’s geometric character — and quirky personality — is evident. The small, covered entrance features an outdoor shower installed adjacent to the front door. Inside, the living space and kitchen are found on the first floor, where an open layout seamlessly connects the two spaces. In the kitchen, the angled walls also provide more counter space. Between the kitchen and living room, a wall of multiple glass panels bring in  natural light . A set of dark wooden stairs leads up to the second level, which houses the bedroom, bathroom and a small work space. Throughout the tiny home, bright white walls and ample natural light lend to the vibrant, modern aesthetic. The neutral color palette is contrasted nicely with a smart collection of modern furnishings and a mix of unique features such exposed copper pipes, blackened wood flooring and kitchen cabinetry made from  reclaimed longleaf pine . + Studio 512 Via Dezeen Photography by Casey Dunn and Whit Preston via Studio 512

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Strategically slanted walls squeeze extra space out of a small guesthouse

How to host Thanksgiving dinner in a tiny home or small apartment

November 9, 2018 by  
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If you live in a tiny home or apartment, the idea of hosting Thanksgiving dinner can seem like a daunting task. A few hundred square feet, no dining furniture, small appliances and limited seating can definitely present some challenges. But if you have a plan, you can throw a successful, delicious feast, even in a tiny house or micro apartment. Here’s how to do it. Make a detailed plan for the menu, and keep it simple The items you need for your Thanksgiving dinner can overwhelm your small space, so you want to plan ahead and develop a strategy for your shopping and cooking . Private chef Amanda Elliott says to keep things simple and stick to four homemade dishes, including the turkey. Make a list of all the ingredients you will need for your menu, and think about your refrigerator and pantry space. If you have a large oven, the turkey is going to take up this space for most of the hours before the meal. Choose side dishes that you can make ahead of time and reheat just before the dinner or ones that you can prepare on the stove. You can also choose menu items that can be served at room temperature, like salad. Related: How to cook and enjoy 10 types of squash other than pumpkin If you have a small oven, you can purchase a prepared turkey from a local restaurant or grocery store to avoid cooking the turkey yourself. There are amazing options out there, just be sure to order it well in advance if that’s the route you want to take. If you have your heart set on making your own turkey, you can cook it outside in a deep fryer or on the barbecue, so you can use your oven for other things. If you would like to have more than four items on your Thanksgiving menu, ask your guests for help. There is no shame in requesting assistance with your menu items. Consider asking one guest to bring a dessert and another to bring an appetizer. Just remember to be specific about what you need, and avoid saying “bring whatever you want.” You don’t want to end up with multiple green bean casseroles or macaroni and cheese dishes. When it comes to serving the food, make your kitchen counters and stove a buffet, and let guests serve themselves. Get creative with seating If you don’t have a large dining table and a lot of seating, don’t panic. A casual dinner where guests can eat wherever they please is just fine. People can sit on the couch and the floor — just be sure to provide guests with trays to hold their plates, cutlery and glasses. Use things like step stools, ottomans, lawn chairs, desk chairs and pillows for extra seating. If you still don’t have enough tables or chairs, you can try renting some from a local party store. Be sure to remove all of the clutter from the space. Clear off all flat surfaces, so people have a place to put their drinks. If you want to do some decorating for the occasion, one statement piece with a couple of decorative elements works well for the festivities without adding clutter. Have a plan for coats and bags. The easiest solution is to keep them all in the bedroom, so your guests aren’t taking up valuable living room space with their bulky outerwear. Have everyone help with the clean-up When you send out invitations, ask guests to bring their own containers to take some food home at the end of the celebration. This will prevent you from getting sick of leftovers, and it keeps food waste to a minimum. Consider asking your guests to help take care of their finished plates. You can do the scrubbing later, but getting help with clearing the tables and throwing away the trash will quickly free up space and give you a little time to make room in your belly for dessert. Experts also agree that the key to keeping your sanity in a tiny home at Thanksgiving is to clean as you go. While you are preparing your food, tidy up the work space throughout the process, and don’t let dishes pile up in the sink. If cleaning as you cook doesn’t work for you, hide the mess by piling all of your dirty dishes in the bathtub and draw the curtain. Then, clean everything after your guests leave. Finally, don’t stress! Sit back, relax and enjoy the day. If you are super stressed, your guests aren’t going to have any fun, either. Put together your plan of attack, and if things don’t go perfectly, it’s okay. Just smile and enjoy some red wine (white wine takes up too much space in the fridge!). Happy Thanksgiving! Images via Shutterstock

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How to host Thanksgiving dinner in a tiny home or small apartment

Enjoy a mint julep on this tiny farmhouse’s charming front porch

November 2, 2018 by  
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If there is one thing that typically eludes tiny home design, it’s open-air space. That’s what makes this gorgeous, modern farmhouse so incredible. Designed by Perch & Nest , Roost 36 is a tiny home on wheels with a large front porch, which was built out of 100 percent recycled composite materials. Even better, the house, which is listed on Airbnb , is located on an idyllic 4-acre farm, letting guests enjoy the amazing scenery from one very cozy front porch. Located in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, Roost 36 was created for a family of four. It boasts non-toxic materials and many energy-efficient features . The exterior is an elongated volume painted white with an A-frame roof, reminiscent of barns and farmhouses found in the area. At one end of the tiny home is a surprisingly large deck, which was built from 100 percent recycled composite. A glass entry wall can be opened completely, blending the interior and exterior spaces. A brilliant system of retractable screens lets residents further open the space or close it off completely while still enjoying fresh air. Related: This tiny farmhouse on wheels starts at 63K On the inside, a comfortable sofa faces a wall with built-in shelving with enough room for the television and various knick-knacks. Large windows and four skylights on the cathedral ceilings naturally brighten the space. There is a fully-equipped kitchen with concrete countertops, a deep farmhouse sink and a very cool, renovated SMEG icebox as a refrigerator. Past the kitchen, a rather spacious bathroom comes installed with a farm-style tub and a composting toilet . There are two sleeping lofts on either side of the tiny home. The master bedroom is reached by steps that double as storage. Underneath the master bedroom is a smaller sleeping nook that can be used as a kids’ room or guest room. On the other side of the home is another sleeping loft, which is 8 feet deep and reached by a library ladder. The tiny home is available for rent on Airbnb , starting around $120 per night. Guests can enjoy the serenity of the area, especially the roaming farm animals and expansive nature found on the site. Hanging Rock and Pilot Mountain state parks are a short drive away and offer tons of hiking and biking trails. + Perch and Nest Via Tiny House Talk Images via Perch and Nest

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