The gorgeous Roadhaus RV soaks up sunlight with a glass-enclosed roof

November 23, 2017 by  
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From the Wyoming-based company Wheelhaus comes the amazing Roadhaus – a tiny house/RV hybrid that measures 10.5 feet wide and 38 feet long, but feels a lot larger. Wheelhaus wrapped the roof of the wedge-shaped home in glass, so the interior is open, airy and gets plenty of sunlight – something many small houses lack. The Roadhaus wedge, which comes with a price tag of $76,000, is certified as an RV, meaning it can be towed and parked in any RV park or campground. Its compact size of only 400 square feet provides the option of traveling the world in this beautiful tiny home on wheels. Related: Solar-powered Tesla Tiny House hits the road in Australia The little wedge is filled with some seriously smooth design features, namely the use of glass to open up the interior space. The living area, as well as the rest of the home, is flooded with natural light thanks to a spectacular raised roof that is part glass and part wood panels. In fact, the strip of wood panels that run the length of the home seems to float over the interior space. The tiny home has a comfy living room on one side and a bedroom with sufficient space for a queen-sized bed on the other. The kitchen is a beautiful space-efficient design with a sink and small stovetop, and plenty of crafty storage options. A gleaming bathroom is covered in silver tiles, adding a touch of bright modernity to the home. The entrance to the home is completely wrapped in glass, including the large door that leads out to a wooden deck jutting out from the interior. + Wheelhaus Via Treehugger Images via Wheelhaus

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The gorgeous Roadhaus RV soaks up sunlight with a glass-enclosed roof

"The stuff nightmares are made of:" thousands of bluebottles on Australian beach

November 23, 2017 by  
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A couple happened upon an astounding sight recently while strolling on the beach in Australia . At Barlings Beach in New South Wales, Brett Wallensky and partner Claudia came across thousands of bluebottles, or Portuguese man o’wars, washed up on land. Such a freaky sight could be more common as climate change impacts our world. The couple came across the horde of Portuguese man o’wars in late October. Brett Wallensky, who said he’d been stung multiple times by bluebottles as a boy, said, “There must have been thousands of them beached and they were all alive and wriggling. It was the stuff nightmares are made of…If you fell in there and got that any stings all over you I can’t imagine you would survive…The color of them was just amazing, it is so bright – almost alien.” He said he’d never seen so many bluebottles together in his life. Related: Thousands of mysterious gelatinous creatures washed up in California According to The Sydney Morning Herald , each year in Australia over 10,000 people report bluebottle stingings. The venomous creatures deliver painful stings, and according to marine biologist Christie Wilcox of the University of Hawai’i at M?noa, the stinging cells can still be active for weeks after they’re beached, so even dead bluebottles can cause pain. Wilcox recommended a vinegar rinse and the application of heat to treat a sting. Wilcox told Gizmodo mass beachings can occur when conditions are right, and that there doesn’t seem to be anything special about this specific stranding. But there’s some question of whether climate change will allow Portuguese man o’wars to thrive. According to marine biologist Lisa-ann Gershin, warmer waters amp up jellyfish metabolism, and the creatures live longer and breed more. Bluebottles could benefit from climate change like jellyfish, according to Gizmodo , and beachings could occur more often. Via Gizmodo , The Sydney Morning Herald , and StoryTrender Images via Caters Clips on YouTube and Depositphotos

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"The stuff nightmares are made of:" thousands of bluebottles on Australian beach

Son builds modern dream cabin from recycled materials for his aging father

November 17, 2017 by  
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Retiring to a cozy cabin in the woods is a dream of many, and one that Josh Wynne helped his father fulfill when he built and designed Mike’s Hammock, a compact dwelling located on his property in Nokomis, Florida. Designed for handicap accessibility, the modern one-room was crafted for aging in place and prioritizes sustainability in its use of recycled materials and low-energy footprint. Stylish and sustainable, the 604-square-meter cabin was constructed with mostly local and recycled materials , including the Southern yellow pine salvaged from a nearby construction site. The careful use of resources resulted in less than one dumpster of waste for the project. To minimize site impact , Josh cantilevered the home above its foundation and planted three trees in place of the one he needed to remove. A custom-made central cooling and heating system helps reduce energy costs to an average of only $25 per month, even in summer, Wynne told New Atlas. Related: This cozy off-grid cabin shows beauty on a budget in upstate New York The facade is clad in vertically oriented corrugated metal siding to match the neighboring barn, while the interior is lined with Southern Yellow Pine that runs horizontally through the structure. The timber’s seamless lines, coupled with the large glazed sliding doors that frame outdoor views, gives the illusion of spaciousness. The small size of the home, as well as the layout and wheel-chair accessible features, cater to his father’s limited mobility without compromising aesthetics. + Josh Wynne Construction Via New Atlas

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Son builds modern dream cabin from recycled materials for his aging father

Recycled materials make up this quirky solar-powered hotel in West Africa

November 17, 2017 by  
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A beautiful sun-soaked retreat on Cape Verde’s island of Sao Vicente prides itself on sustainability. Ramos Castellano Arquitectos designed the Terra Lodge Hotel using recycled and found materials, water recycling systems, and a rooftop solar array . The hotel draws the eye with its gridded timber frame, constructed from unfinished African wood, that partially encloses private verandas. Built predominately from lime-plastered concrete, the Terra Lodge Hotel’s five structures are rotated to optimize views and cross breezes. The hotel includes 12 rooms and a suite, a breakfast room, a lap pool, and a large outdoor terrace on the roof of an old green colonial house that now houses the owner’s tourist agency. The architects used found materials in construction, such as the recycled metals from petroleum barrels for the gate and the locally sourced rocks for the walls. Related: Hotel Shabby Shabby: Pop-Up Hotel Offers Recycled Rooms Built for Under €250 “Every solution is simplified adapting to the island lack of material and resources, simple and essential for satisfying basic needings, not for ephemeral fashion,” wrote the architects. “Almost everything is handmade, employing people from the neighborhood, from the floor finishing to the furniture, trying to distribute the economy of the building construction in the social environment.” The architects also designed the furnishings and light systems with locally handcrafted and recycled wood. + Ramos Castellano Arquitectos Via ArchDaily Images © Sergio Pirrone

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Recycled materials make up this quirky solar-powered hotel in West Africa

MUJIs $26k prefab huts are finally available for sale

November 7, 2017 by  
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The wait is over— MUJI’s microhomes are now officially on sale to the public. Ever since MUJI debuted their line of tiny prefabricated homes in 2015, fans of the minimalist design brand have eagerly awaited the chance to get their hands on one of their tiny prefabricated homes, called MUJI Huts , starting at a little over $26,000 USD. Per MUJI’s famous minimalist aesthetic, the MUJI Huts are elegant and understated. Timber surfaces and a light-tone color palette creates a cozy and welcoming character. The first MUJI Hut to hit the market is a compact 9-square-meter cabin clad in blackened timber and lined in domestic fir wood. Sliding glass doors let in ample natural light and open up to a small covered patio. The simplicity of the design makes it easy for the microhome to adapt to variety of environments and uses. Related: MUJI to sell eagerly awaited $27k minimalist tiny homes this fall Base pricing for the MUJI Hut starts at 3 million yen (approximately $26,340 USD), tax and construction costs included. Insulation and electrical outlets are optional add-ons. Unfortunately, MUJI Hut is presently only available for sale in Japan—lucky residents can order a microhome from MUJI’s global flagship store at Yurakucho —but fans of the microhome are always welcome to test drive a MUJI Hut at the MUJI Camp in Tsumagoi , about an hour out of Tokyo via bullet train. + MUJI Hut Via SoraNews24

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MUJIs $26k prefab huts are finally available for sale

Skinny micro-apartment can pop up in any city in just one day

October 17, 2017 by  
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The thought of living in an apartment with the footprint of a parking space may seem improbable and uncomfortable, but the chic Tikku micro-apartment shows us that it can be done. In response to pressures of the housing crises, Finnish architect Marco Casagrande of Casagrande Laboratory designed and built a prefabricated mobile micro-apartment that can pop up in as little as a day. The three-story-tall micro-apartment is designed to be mobile so it can go almost anywhere a car can—with enough overhead clearance—and can operate off the grid. Tikku, which means ‘stick’ in Finnish, earns its name from its skinny profile and timber construction assembled from cross-laminated timber modules. The stackable modules occupy the footprint of a parking space measuring 2.5 by 5 meters and require no foundations thanks to a sand box counterweight located at the bottom of the building. Even in Finland’s brutal winters, the architects say that 20-centimeter-thick cross-laminated timber is sufficient to weather the cold without added insulation . The first Tikku prototype was unveiled for the Helsinki Design Week 2017 outside Atheneum in the heart of Helsinki. The 37.5-square-meter micro-apartment includes three floors, one for sleeping, another for working, and the topmost reserved for a light-filled greenhouse. The CLT modules allow for easy customization and the introduction of different living spaces, from a kitchen and sauna to knitting room and workshop. Related: NYC announces opening of its first micro-apartment building, Carmel Place The Tikku is self-sufficient and runs off of solar energy. Composting toilets are installed, however running water is not. Residents are expected to make use of their urban resources for showers, saunas, and laundry machines—a reasonable expectation for cities like Helsinki or Tokyo that have that infrastructure. “Tikku is a safe-house for neo-archaic biourbanism, a contemporary cave for a modern urban nomad,” wrote the architects. “It will offer privacy, safety and comfort. All the rest of the functions can be found in the surrounding city. Tikku is a needle of urban acupuncture, conquering the no-man’s land from the cars and tuning the city towards the organic. Many Tikkus can grow side-by-side like mushrooms and they can fuse into larger organisms.” + Casagrande Laboratory Via ArchDaily Images via Casagrande Laboratory

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Skinny micro-apartment can pop up in any city in just one day

Student-built solar-powered tiny home represents new vision for the American dream

October 9, 2017 by  
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The future of tiny home design is looking very bright. A team of students from Sacramento State, working under the name Sol Vespiade , have designed a beautiful self-sustaining tiny home that reflects a new sustainable way of living for future generations. The solar-powered , 400-square-foot home on wheels – with a seriously comfy interior – is a powerhouse of energy generation that offers the ultimate in flexible, off-grid living. The exterior of the tiny home was clad in a light paint color with cedar trim, paying homage to the traditional American wooden homes. However, this classic look has been modernized with various innovative and visible sustainable features that take the home into the future of sustainable living. A vertical wall of solar panels was installed on the northern facade, complementing the roof’s solar array , in order to provide the home with ample electricity. Related: Luxury Fireside tiny house resort carries an important message for sustainability Alternatively, the home’s southern facade is equipped with an evacuated tube solar collector , which converts sunlight into heat for water. The system is protected by a rigid steel frame that keeps it safe while traveling. For the home’s water needs, a 40 gallon rainwater collection tank was affixed to the home’s western side. The home’s entrance is through two wide french doors that swing out as to not take up too much space once inside the home. The living space is light and airy thanks to the glass doors as well as a large bay window that sits over an extended counter/dining space. In addition to the natural light they offer, the multiple windows provide cross ventilation to create a healthy, natural atmosphere, reducing the need for air conditioning. The interior design is a sophisticated blend of a cool teal color on the walls, accented with honey-toned wood paneling. The wooden accents are used in the home’s shelving, flooring, and the stairs, which lead up to a small sleeping loft. Hidden in a corner is a mechanical well that allows for monitoring of the home’s electrical and water use. Eight 6 watt deep-cycle batteries that store the energy and a 20 gallon water tank stores the water heated by the solar collector. The tiny home will soon be on display in Sacramento’s upcoming SMUD Tiny House Competition. +  Sol Vespiade Photos by Mike Chino for Inhabitat

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Breathtakingly beautiful tiny home is surprisingly luxurious inside

October 6, 2017 by  
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Meet “The Escher”—a stunning tiny home that’ll steal your breath away. Designed and built by New Frontier Tiny Homes , this gorgeous mobile home uses clever space-saving design, high-end materials, and craftsmanship to prove that living large is possible in small spaces. The Escher combines rustic appeal with contemporary design into a surprisingly luxurious and dreamy abode. The Escher model was designed and built as a full-time family home for a couple with a child. Although the clients originally wanted the firm’s flagship model, The Alpha, they later decided on a more spacious custom-build, The Escher, which was named after their child. Shou Sugi Ban cedar siding, Red Western Cedar siding, and Federal Blue Custom Metal Siding clad the 28-foot-long Escher, while mechanical seam metal tops the roof. The home achieves its spacious feel thanks largely to tall ceilings, ample insulated glazing (in particular the 8-foot-by-8-foot glass garage door), and recessed LEDs. Solid poplar shiplap is used for the interior siding and ceiling. Ebony-stained solid walnut hardwood lines the floors. Two bedrooms are placed on either end of the home—the master bedroom with a king-size bed located in the 7.5-foot-long gooseneck, while the child’s bedroom is placed in a spacious loft accessible via a custom solid oak ladder (made with only wooden joinery). In total, the home offers seven distinct spaces: two bedrooms, kitchen, office, bathroom, walk-in closet with storage, and a dining area. The dining/living area is located in a spacious area behind the giant glass garage door that opens up the home to the outdoors. Moveable and transformable furniture make up a custom dining table, two benches, four stools, and two coffee tables that can be stored beneath the kitchen floor and provide extra hidden storage. The gorgeous kitchen features a 33-inch porcelain farmhouse apron sink with a fridge, 36-inch gas cooktop with hood, dishwasher drawer, custom cabinetry and shelving, porcelain countertops, as well as a custom copper backsplash and accents. Custom shoji paper sliding doors separate the kitchen from the master bedroom that houses a king-sized bed on a hydraulic lift that allows for full floor storage underneath. Below the loft bedroom on the opposite side of the home is the office, walk-in closet, and bathroom. The office consists of a bifold walnut standing desk and windows that open up to an outdoor bar area. The bathroom includes a composting toilet , floating sink, washer/dryer, custom tiling, herringbone pattern flooring made of ebony stained walnut, and a beautiful shower that easily fits two people. Related: Tiny home clad in burnt wood packs a ton of luxury into just 240 square feet The stunning home’s space-saving design is impressive but we think it’s the craftsmanship and detailing that elevates The Escher high above the typical tiny home. In addition to high-end appliances, the home features custom stone and timber furnishings and detailing, as well as a one-of-a-kind mural wall by 1767 Designs. Pricing for The Escher starts at $139,000. The tiny home was recently unveiled on HGTV and DIY’s “Tiny House, Big Living” television series. + New Frontier Tiny Homes

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Breathtakingly beautiful tiny home is surprisingly luxurious inside

Cool micro studio in Budapest makes the most out of 344 square feet

September 25, 2017 by  
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Space-efficient design is of the utmost importance when creating livable tiny spaces like this beautiful 344-square-foot studio located in Budapest, Hungary. The compact space was designed by Studio Bunyik for the homeowner who likes to socialize at home. Using bespoke furniture pieces by local company Architecture Uncomfortable Workshop to designate individual spaces, the design team shrewdly created an open floor plan that manages to make the most out of the small interior. The micro space was outfitted with all of the comforts of home, including a fully-equipped kitchen and dining area, study, and lounge. The spaces are all divided with singular furniture pieces , creating a comfy and functional living space that doubles as an office during the day and entertaining space on the weekend. Related: At Just 150 Sq. Ft., This Tiny Real Estate Office is One of NYC’s Smallest Workplaces The wooden furniture was all hand crafted by a local furniture company, The Architecture Uncomfortable Workshop. All of the furniture was designed to give the homeowner a space for all of his hobbies and passions as well as functional pieces like his work station or wooden ladder that leads to the sleeping loft. + Studio Bunyik + Architecture Uncomfortable Workshop Via Dwell Photography via Bence Farkasinszki  

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Cool micro studio in Budapest makes the most out of 344 square feet

Kodasemas tiny solar-powered homes pop up in less than a day so you can move in the next

July 6, 2017 by  
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Estonian design collective Kodasema just launched KODA, a line of tiny prefabricated homes with big goals for tackling the affordable housing crisis. Crafted with high-quality factory precision, these mobile modern homes pop up in as little as a day and come with highly energy-efficient features, from solar panels to built-in smart home systems. Already installed in the Netherlands and Estonia, the solar-powered KODA home popped up in the UK last month with a starting price of £150,000. A £150,000 micro home might seem like an odd solution for the housing crisis, but John O’Brien, Associate Director for Construction Innovation at Kodasema, says that the KODA’s reusable multipurpose design gives it a big cost advantage. The unit’s ease of mobility and installation—no foundations needed—allows owners to reuse KODA in different sites and situations, whether it’s to move it to a new location or transformation from a summer home to a classroom. The tiny KODA also can also pop up in unused yet prime locations in cities such as London. The price includes the cost of planning and building regulations, delivery, site preparation, installation, and connection to water, electricity, and sewage. “The simple yet effective design could help alleviate the pressures of the housing crisis on local authorities, providing temporary homes or workspaces on empty sites,” said O’Brien. “This trend of short-term use of derelict land, which can be left untouched for years, even during the planning stages, is becoming more common, especially in London . KODA would provide a cost-effective option to house those on the waiting list for affordable accommodation or offer temporary rental apartments for young professionals, students and those looking to downsize.” Related: KODA is a tiny solar-powered house that can move with its owners The 25-square-meter KODA makes the most of its small footprint with a full-height quadruple-glazed window that fills the wood-lined living space with natural light and creates a sense of spaciousness. A 3.5-meter-wide outdoor terrace as well as an indoor living, kitchen, and dining area are located in the front of the building, while the rear is reserved for the bathroom and mezzanine bedroom. The solar-powered home is equipped with smart-home features for systems such as alarms, programmable LED lighting , and climate control. Thin, vacuum-insulated concrete walls wrap around KODA to keep it cool in summer and warm in winter. The KODA recently debuted in the UK at BRE Innovation Park , a research facility in Watford for full-scale demonstrations of low-carbon and sustainable housing. Kodasema plans to release multistory, stackable KODA modules in 2018. The design collective is also a recent winner of the WAN Urban Challenge 2017 , a global ideas competition for solutions to London’s housing crisis. + Kodasema Via Dezeen

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