This bold ship-inspired tiny house has a surprising minimalist interior

May 11, 2018 by  
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Designed by Brian and Joni Buzarde, the Land Ark RV is a tiny home on wheels that’s geared toward adventurers who prefer to travel in style. Not only does the RV’s design include a contemporary and sophisticated all-black corrugated metal exterior, but the interior boasts a well-lit living space, complete with all of the comforts of home. The sleek silhouette of the beautiful RV is inspired by the symmetrical front elevation often found in ship design. The sloped roof appears steeper from different angles, creating a sense of movement even when the tiny home is stationary. Related: Timber cabin on wheels lets you hit the open road in luxurious comfort In contrast to the sleek, all-black exterior, the interior is a light-filled oasis of strategic design. Clad in natural pinewood panels, the living space is large and airy. The kitchen and living room are subtly integrated, sharing a long shelf that pulls double duty as a dining area or office desk. A large sleeping loft is accessible by ladder and lit by various windows. For extra space on the ground floor, an additional “flex room” can fit a queen size bed or serve as an office. The tiny home ‘s bathroom, which comes with a 30 x 60 inch tub and Kohler features, is compact but has a long pine ledge to create plenty of shelf space. There are also several linen and storage nooks to help deter clutter. + Land Ark RV Via Dwell Photography by Jeremy Gudac via Land Ark RV

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This bold ship-inspired tiny house has a surprising minimalist interior

This charming old-fashioned caravan tiny house is 100% self sustaining

April 27, 2018 by  
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This caravan tiny house is a blast from the past. Designed and constructed by father-and-son builders Nick and Aaron Troisi ( The Unknown Craftsmen ), the tiny home on wheels is 100 percent self-sufficient. The wandering caravan includes a curved roof, custom woodwork and round windows. The home also has LED lighting, and it’s designed to operate completely off-grid . The home’s exterior is clad in pine panels painted red. A deck, built with raw-cut wooden logs, leads to the charming curved door. The father-son duo strategically designed a double-height roof to create a sleeping loft. The curved roof greatly enhances the tiny home’s interior and has three circular windows to bring in natural light . Related: Steve Areen’s incredible DIY wagon home built with mostly recycled materials Inside, the home resembles a hobbit-esque cavern. Lined with wooden beams, the high ceiling allowed the builders to add a quaint sleeping loft, accessible by stairs. The living area includes a curved reading nook with a small sofa, bright throw pillows and a cute window that lets in light. The designers incorporated a number of repurposed items into the home, including a brass bucket used as the kitchen sink. The round windows are actually repurposed theater light lenses — a feature that pays homage to the owner’s long career in the performing arts. Custom woodwork abounds — from the panels on the walls to the kitchen counter top, which was made from an apricot tree. The home was crafted with several types of wood cut from the owner’s own yard: pine, apricot, cherry and more. Aaron Troisi explained that the inspiration behind the wood-heavy design came from a desire to “explore the natural beauty of the organic world.” + The Unknown Craftsmen Via Tiny Living Images via The Unknown Craftsmen

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This charming old-fashioned caravan tiny house is 100% self sustaining

This whimsical tiny house with its own pizza oven was built for just $15,000

April 25, 2018 by  
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Although some may equate living in a tiny house with austere minimalism, with savvy planning there’s always room for a little whimsy. Take this 221-square-foot tiny home, which, in addition to its homey, light-filled interior, has a full-on pizza oven installed in the kitchen. Recently featured on Zillow , the tiny home was built for just $15,000 – and it’s full of personality. Owners Robert and Rebekah Sofia designed and built this whimsical tiny home in just 20 months. From the beginning, the empty nesters knew they wanted the space to reflect their vibrant lifestyle. Looking to stay within budget, they used as many reclaimed materials as possible. Related: Firefighter’s self-built tiny house is an earthship on wheels The 800-degree wood-fired pizza oven in the home speaks volumes about the couple’s appreciation for the finer things in life. Not many people would consider putting such a hot-burning amenity in a compact space, but the couple achieved temperature control by using multiple layers of plaster and cement, along with a very heavy metal door. In addition to having one of the more intersting features we’ve ever seen in a tiny house, the beautiful home also has an outdoor soaking tub, a formal dining room with a chandelier, and even a music loft. + Zillow Via Apartment Therapy Photography by John Jernigan via Zillow

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This whimsical tiny house with its own pizza oven was built for just $15,000

This custom-built tiny house is big on interior design

April 9, 2018 by  
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Washington-based company Handcrafted Movement is making quite the name for itself with custom-made tiny homes. The company’s latest micro dwelling — called the Coastal Craftsman — is so gorgeously designed that you’ll forget it’s only a mere 238-square-foot space. The energy-efficient tiny home has a stunning interior design that is not only open and airy; it is also handcrafted with various reclaimed materials. The home, which is built onto a transportable trailer , is clad in a cream-colored board and batten siding with Pacific Cedar accents, complimented with a dark metal rooftop. A lovely glass-panel door leads into the living space, which has distressed oak flooring that contrasts nicely with the white walls. Throughout the home, the interior design gives off a relaxed beach vibe, enhanced with an abundance of natural light. Related: These solar-powered tiny homes are designed just for millennials The furnishings were all strategically custom-built  to provide personal touches to the home without adding clutter. A chaise lounge-style sofa bed is at the heart of the living area, providing a comfy place to read or watch television. There’s an electric fireplace to keep warm in the winter months, and a vintage desk and chair sit in a small nook under a window. The tiny kitchen has plenty of shelving and cupboards. The space is compact, but efficient and includes a dining table made out of Oregon-sourced, salvaged walnut wood . In the corner of the kitchen, stairs lead up to the sleeping loft, which has enough space for a king-size bed. Matt Impola, the founder of Handcrafted Movement, framed the walls himself and even inserted custom-made roof trusses to add dimension to the tiny home design . The craftsmanship of the project is incredibly impressive. “I built much of the tiny home components—the exterior shutters, kitchen cabinets, bathroom doors, stairs, electric fireplace, television cabinet, coffee counter, dining table, etc. — from scratch, and had two production assistants help me assemble and finish all them,” Impola said. “I’ve seen too many tiny homes with minuscule couches that will not realistically be comfortable for very long, so it’s important for me to be able to fit full-size furniture in every tiny home I build.” In addition to its amazing design, the home was also built with various energy-efficient features such as rock-based Roxul insulation, 10 large energy-star windows, LED lighting, an instant water heater, and a propane oven and cooker. Thanks to these features, the home’s monthly energy costs are incredibly low — an estimated $12 to $25 per month. + Handcrafted Movement Via Dwell Photos via Handcrafted Movement

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This custom-built tiny house is big on interior design

Skinny micro-home creates illusion of space with natural light and materials

March 2, 2018 by  
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Space-saving furniture and ample glazing are key in making this skinny timber house welcoming and livable despite its tiny footprint slightly larger than the average parking space. Dutch practice Ana Rocha Architecture designed the micro-home, named Slim Fit, in Almere Poort, the Netherlands. The home comprises 538 square feet of living space across three floors. Clad in vertically oriented Ayous hardwood that appear to emphasize height, the 172-square-foot Slim Fit avoids a monolithic appearance thanks to the heat-resistant glass windows of varying sizes punctuating the facade. The windows also allow for cross-breezes and fill the interior with natural light. Tall ceilings, birch plywood paneling, and a minimalist design add to the illusion of spaciousness. Related: Rotterdam couple lives in a skinny house built from 15 tonnes of industrial waste The three-story skinny home includes a kitchen and dining area on the first floor, while the living room is placed on the second level. The bedroom with a bathroom and wardrobe is located on the top-most level. Custom space-saving furniture and elements constructed from birch offer subtle but effective ways for creating a bright and airy appearance, from sliding doors to an open-tread staircase that connects to open shelving. + Ana Rocha Architecture Via Dezeen Images by Christiane Wirth

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Skinny micro-home creates illusion of space with natural light and materials

Steve Areen’s incredible DIY wagon home built with mostly recycled materials

February 27, 2018 by  
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Steve Areen is one of those people who turns everything into gold. And by gold, I mean magic. I mean soul. We saw it with his lovely dome home in Thailand , and now, what was supposed to be a simple dwelling in Australia evolved into an extraordinary modern caravan that he built by hand with mostly recycled materials . The roaming flight attendant, 52, started with a 5×10 trailer, to which a local artisan helped add a curved steel frame. Then the muse stepped in. Complete with custom furniture, a round window seat and wood-fired stove, the cylindrical Unity Wagon — perched on Yandoit Farm about 80 miles northwest of Melbourne — will set your tiny home-heart on fire. Read on for a closer look at some of the details that give Steve’s latest project such charm. Steve says he has been living part-time on Yandoit Farm for the last few years. “My friends Michael and Lisa, with help from volunteers from around the world, are doing an amazing job transforming what was once a dried up ranch into a lush organic farm, using permaculture principles,” he adds. So, he decided to build a small structure that keeps bugs and snakes at bay (the experience with a poisonous snake in his bed elsewhere in Australia probably a motivating factor). As we now know about Steve, he loves curvy structures, which have a range of benefits . For him, it’s about the look, feel and “amazing energy”. He told Inhabitat, “I decided to make my own version of a covered wagon, with a pulley system that made it easy to roll the canvas all the way up and a strap that pulls it down back down. I had never seen this done before, but it sure worked well in my head.” Starting with the shiplap timber cladding, all discards from a local mill, Steve sanded and oiled each piece by hand. He said some of the worst-looking boards ended up being the most beautiful after a bit of tender loving care, though attaching the warped pieces to the steel skeleton was sometimes tricky. The name Unity Wagon was inspired by the way the various Australian hardwoods, each with their own history, came together. The double wall allowed him to create round cutouts that also serve as storage and lighting, as well as his signature round window seat. These details combined with rope trimming gives the caravan something of a nautical aesthetic , he tells Living Big in a Tiny House in the above video. Related: Magical dome home in Thailand constructed in six weeks for just $8000 He calls his bed “optimistic”. Normally, it’s sized for a single person. But if he has company, he can expand it, sliding out the base and adding a couple of cushions. This extends to guests as well. Since the caravan is parked on the farm, he hopes other people will be able to enjoy the use of it, with all proceeds going to either educational programs or more “fun structures.” And when he is around, a sliding table pulls out between two benches covered in richly-hued fabrics, providing enough space for up to seven people to sit and share a meal. A full blown party on the cards? No problem. Unity Wagon was built for play. Steve promotes climbing on the roof and in general having fun in and with the space. At some point, he hopes to take his tiny home to festivals. A work in progress, and an artwork at that, Unity Wagon isn’t designed for full-time living. Steve can use the stovetop to boil water and other basics, and he left room to install a cooking stove, but for now he has to use the farm’s ablutions (hot water powered by a giant compost pile – yay!) A small solar system provides power for the interior lighting. But because his home is small and compact, with plenty of crafty storage nooks, he doesn’t need much else. On a clear day, it’s possible to completely open the wagon to the elements. If the insects are out in force, Steve has fly screens secured tightly with velcro, and with any hint of inclement weather, he can pull the canvas cover in a jiffy. On his first night in the completed caravan, he left the cover off, sleeping under a sweep of stars. All told, it cost under $15,000 to build the wagon, much of which went to skilled labor. Despite some frustrating moments, Steve describes the months he spent working solo in an open hay shed, dreaming up new ideas and solutions, as “crazy fun.” And this won’t be the last we’ll see of him. “Though I have no interest in being in the building business,” he says, “I do look forward to building more fun structures, ones that keep people connected to nature, are interactive and of course… curvy.” + Steve Areen All images by Steve Areen

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Steve Areen’s incredible DIY wagon home built with mostly recycled materials

Winners of tiny house competition pack comfort and functionality into 269 square feet

February 19, 2018 by  
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Modular building company Ryterna modul recently announced the winners of their Architectural Challenge 2018 competition. Participants were tasked with designing a cozy, functional, modular 269-square-foot tiny house with a living area, sleeping area, kitchen, and bathroom. They received 150 projects from designers in 88 countries and narrowed the field down to three winners and an honorable mention. Abdolrahman Kadkhodasalehi of Iran took first place with his Wave House . Wave House curves up on both sides, with the goal of maximizing use of natural resources. The curves of water in nature inspired the design , and naturally, water and its use features prominently in this tiny house. Water from the sinks and shower are sent to a refinery tank to be purified and re-pumped. High windows in the tiny house invite occupants to fully enjoy surrounding natural landscape, and a folding desk inside is just one feature that creates more space. Related: How one couple adapted a 204-square-foot tiny house for their new baby Julia and Stas Kaptur of Russia nabbed second place for their tiny house 24052705 . They said they entered the competition because “it is a big dream to create spaces in picturesque, hard-to-reach places, such as a river bank, or deep-deep forest.” Transparent external walls with sliding doors invite dwellers of this tiny home to enjoy nature from any room. 24052705 features modular rooms with a living room in the middle. In the standard design, a bedroom and kitchen/bathroom are on either side. The design can be enlarged to include more rooms. William Samin of Indonesia took home third place for his tiny house TM 0301 . He comprised his design of modules that can be stacked or mounted horizontally. The tiny house can be adapted to different types of terrain with a vertical configuration or on stilts . Pivot walls or what Samin called glazing doors can be opened to allow fresh air to flood the home. Floor level storage for rollable mattresses or folded furniture maximize space in the design. The tiny house can go off-grid with a rainwater collection system and solar panels. Ryterna modul gave an honorable mention to Clarence Zichen Qian of China for ATN . They said in their video that his highly theoretical concept prompted them to reflect and think deeper about human existence. ATN can be a tilted or leaning tiny house that’s pictured perched atop other buildings, “detached from the crowd,” according to the PDF on the design. The purpose of the tiny house is to give an occupant time away from social media , in which they can observe and ponder the meaning of life. + Ryterna modul + Ryterna modul Architectural Challenge 2018 Images courtesy of Ryterna modul

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Winners of tiny house competition pack comfort and functionality into 269 square feet

Student ditches cramped dorm to live large in a self-built tiny house

February 15, 2018 by  
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Although tiny home living may not be for everyone, there is one group who is certainly taking advantage of the minimal living trend – college students. Instead of paying thousands of dollars to stay in a cramped, closet-like dorm room, one ambitious college student named Bradley took his living situation into his own hands by building his own 230-square-feet abode, aptly named Rolling Quarters. After spending a year paying for on campus housing, Bradley decided it was time to build his own home, something that would give him his own personal space and designed to his taste. “Right out of high school I went and paid a year’s worth of rent and decided that wasn’t for me,” he said in an interview with Living Big In A Tiny House . “So I moved back home to save some money and pay for it all in cash to build it.” Related: Two college students build a tiny home for under $500 After purchasing a 27-foot-long trailer, he looked to Craigslist to find materials he could repurpose into his new home. A few things like the vinyl siding were bought new, but the total price of the project came in just under $15,000. Bradley’s self-built tiny home on wheels is just 230 square feet, but packs a large punch in terms of living space. The entrance of the home is through a lovely wooden deck with two rocking chairs set up to enjoy the surrounding wooded lot. The interior space has a comfy, cabin-like atmosphere with wooden flooring and wood-planked ceiling. The living space, which is air-conditioned, is at the heart of the home, with a medium sized pull-out sofa and tv, and a small nook for a desk. The kitchen, although compact, is incredibly efficient and conceals a number of space-saving and storage features. Additional storage is tucked under the stairs that lead up to the sleeping loft. Although Bradley now lives off campus, that doesn’t mean that his social life was affected. In fact, the ambitious student has had up to 25 guests in his home and even occasionally rents out Rolling Quarters on Airbnb . + Rolling Quarters Instagram Via Apartment Therapy Images via Rolling Quarters Instagram and Airbnb. Video via Living Big in a Tiny House Just 25 people hanging out comfortably in a tiny house. #saystheguywiththelofttohimself #tinyhouse #bradthebuilder #thow #tinyhouseonwheels #diythow #tinyhousemovement #diytinyhouse #minimalist #minimalism A post shared by Rolling Quarters Tiny House (@rolling_quarters_tinyhouse) on Oct 7, 2017 at 7:37am PDT

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Student ditches cramped dorm to live large in a self-built tiny house

The gorgeous Roadhaus RV soaks up sunlight with a glass-enclosed roof

November 23, 2017 by  
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From the Wyoming-based company Wheelhaus comes the amazing Roadhaus – a tiny house/RV hybrid that measures 10.5 feet wide and 38 feet long, but feels a lot larger. Wheelhaus wrapped the roof of the wedge-shaped home in glass, so the interior is open, airy and gets plenty of sunlight – something many small houses lack. The Roadhaus wedge, which comes with a price tag of $76,000, is certified as an RV, meaning it can be towed and parked in any RV park or campground. Its compact size of only 400 square feet provides the option of traveling the world in this beautiful tiny home on wheels. Related: Solar-powered Tesla Tiny House hits the road in Australia The little wedge is filled with some seriously smooth design features, namely the use of glass to open up the interior space. The living area, as well as the rest of the home, is flooded with natural light thanks to a spectacular raised roof that is part glass and part wood panels. In fact, the strip of wood panels that run the length of the home seems to float over the interior space. The tiny home has a comfy living room on one side and a bedroom with sufficient space for a queen-sized bed on the other. The kitchen is a beautiful space-efficient design with a sink and small stovetop, and plenty of crafty storage options. A gleaming bathroom is covered in silver tiles, adding a touch of bright modernity to the home. The entrance to the home is completely wrapped in glass, including the large door that leads out to a wooden deck jutting out from the interior. + Wheelhaus Via Treehugger Images via Wheelhaus

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The gorgeous Roadhaus RV soaks up sunlight with a glass-enclosed roof

"The stuff nightmares are made of:" thousands of bluebottles on Australian beach

November 23, 2017 by  
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A couple happened upon an astounding sight recently while strolling on the beach in Australia . At Barlings Beach in New South Wales, Brett Wallensky and partner Claudia came across thousands of bluebottles, or Portuguese man o’wars, washed up on land. Such a freaky sight could be more common as climate change impacts our world. The couple came across the horde of Portuguese man o’wars in late October. Brett Wallensky, who said he’d been stung multiple times by bluebottles as a boy, said, “There must have been thousands of them beached and they were all alive and wriggling. It was the stuff nightmares are made of…If you fell in there and got that any stings all over you I can’t imagine you would survive…The color of them was just amazing, it is so bright – almost alien.” He said he’d never seen so many bluebottles together in his life. Related: Thousands of mysterious gelatinous creatures washed up in California According to The Sydney Morning Herald , each year in Australia over 10,000 people report bluebottle stingings. The venomous creatures deliver painful stings, and according to marine biologist Christie Wilcox of the University of Hawai’i at M?noa, the stinging cells can still be active for weeks after they’re beached, so even dead bluebottles can cause pain. Wilcox recommended a vinegar rinse and the application of heat to treat a sting. Wilcox told Gizmodo mass beachings can occur when conditions are right, and that there doesn’t seem to be anything special about this specific stranding. But there’s some question of whether climate change will allow Portuguese man o’wars to thrive. According to marine biologist Lisa-ann Gershin, warmer waters amp up jellyfish metabolism, and the creatures live longer and breed more. Bluebottles could benefit from climate change like jellyfish, according to Gizmodo , and beachings could occur more often. Via Gizmodo , The Sydney Morning Herald , and StoryTrender Images via Caters Clips on YouTube and Depositphotos

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"The stuff nightmares are made of:" thousands of bluebottles on Australian beach

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