This whimsical tiny house with its own pizza oven was built for just $15,000

April 25, 2018 by  
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Although some may equate living in a tiny house with austere minimalism, with savvy planning there’s always room for a little whimsy. Take this 221-square-foot tiny home, which, in addition to its homey, light-filled interior, has a full-on pizza oven installed in the kitchen. Recently featured on Zillow , the tiny home was built for just $15,000 – and it’s full of personality. Owners Robert and Rebekah Sofia designed and built this whimsical tiny home in just 20 months. From the beginning, the empty nesters knew they wanted the space to reflect their vibrant lifestyle. Looking to stay within budget, they used as many reclaimed materials as possible. Related: Firefighter’s self-built tiny house is an earthship on wheels The 800-degree wood-fired pizza oven in the home speaks volumes about the couple’s appreciation for the finer things in life. Not many people would consider putting such a hot-burning amenity in a compact space, but the couple achieved temperature control by using multiple layers of plaster and cement, along with a very heavy metal door. In addition to having one of the more intersting features we’ve ever seen in a tiny house, the beautiful home also has an outdoor soaking tub, a formal dining room with a chandelier, and even a music loft. + Zillow Via Apartment Therapy Photography by John Jernigan via Zillow

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This whimsical tiny house with its own pizza oven was built for just $15,000

Couple converts $7,000 Joshua Tree cabin into a sophisticated desert oasis

April 19, 2018 by  
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When Kathrin and Brian Smirke decided to buy an abandoned property in the desert landscape of Joshua Tree for $7,000, they knew that they had a massive undertaking on their hands. The old cabin , which dated back to 1957, had been left rotting in the desert for years. But with a lot of vision and hard work, the ambitious duo converted the 480-square-foot homestead into a beautiful desert oasis. The couple chronicled the massive renovation project they lovingly call “The Shack Attack” on their blog, We Are in Our Element . The poor state of the structure meant gutting the interior down to the base boards to start fresh. Over a period of two years, the couple revamped the cabin into a beautiful desert home. “We spent over a year planning, demolishing, building, planning again, building, and then finally decorating this little gem,” Kathrin explains. “What makes this home special is that we did a lot of the work ourselves, including the design, complete demolition, framing, plumbing, trim electrical, and we even built a lot of the interior fixtures and art.” Related: Stunning Lucid Stead Cabin Reflects the Colors and Movements of the Mojave Desert The process was quite detailed, with the Smirkes focused on reducing the project’s footprint at every turn. They also had to deal with several building restrictions included in the sale of the property, namely not being allowed to increase the square footage of the structure. Nevertheless, they were determined to fit a comfortable living room, kitchen, full bathroom, and bedroom that would accommodate a king-size bed into the compact space . Using various reclaimed materials, they converted the space into a light-filled home. Large sliding glass doors in the entrance and the bedroom open the interior up to incredible views as well as an abundance of natural light. Additionally, they managed to salvage some materials from the original building – Brian created a few decorative pieces by repurposing timber from the original structure. In the kitchen, Kathrin and Brian formed and poured the concrete countertops themselves and made the floating shelves out of leftover clear pine and plywood. At the back of the home is a compact sleeping area that fits a comfortable king-size platform bed. Again, multiple windows in the room add a light and airy touch to the small space. To take full advantage of the desert landscape , the couple put a lot of work into creating a seamless connection between the interior and the exterior. A large covered porch offers stunning views. But, without a doubt, the heart of the project is the outdoor bathtub, an old water trough painted white. Surrounded by a wooden deck, this is the ultimate space for relaxing while the desert sun sets. The Shack Attack is available to rent via Airbnb throughout the year. + We Are in Our Element Via Dwell Images via We Are in Our Element

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Couple converts $7,000 Joshua Tree cabin into a sophisticated desert oasis

This serene mobile cabin lets you roam as you like in the Bavarian forest

March 6, 2018 by  
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This tiny house in an idyllic valley at the foot of the Bavarian mountains takes full advantage of the incredible landscape. It’s fitted with wheels, so guests can rent the cabin and choose its location within the Wild-Berghof Buchet nature reserve – from an expansive green meadow near a pond to the park’s game reserve. The HYT mobile hotel room – which was designed by Architekten GbR – is just a mere 8 x 20 feet on the inside, but it can accommodate up to 5 people and has all of the basic needs for an amazing back-to-nature getaway. The park is located just outside of Deggendorf at the foothills of the lush green Bavarian forest. The tiny wooden cabin is clad in grey panels, paying homage to the many rural barns found in the Bavarian region. Designed to be a movable hotel room, the structure is located on wheels and can be transported by tractor according to the guests’ preferred destination. This allows visitors to the park to enjoy a variety of landscapes from a breathtaking green meadow to the park’s natural game reserve. Related: Escape Traveler is a tiny cabin on wheels that can be moved anywhere The interior of the cabin is bright white, which, along with the many windows, opens up the space to provide a calming retreat-like atmosphere. The living space is a mere 160 square feet but can sleep up to five people. Additionally, there is a small bathroom, a seating area, as well as a mini kitchen with a wood-burning stove. The cabin design is so beautiful that the mobile cabin was recently recognized as one of 15 outstanding projects among the German Design Award winners. + Architekten GbR Via Holiday Architecture Photography by Johannes Nagl and Hausfreunde via Architekten GbR

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This serene mobile cabin lets you roam as you like in the Bavarian forest

The GCC’s first commercial vertical farm launches in Dubai

March 6, 2018 by  
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Cultivating crops in Dubai’s harsh climate isn’t easy — but indoor vertical farms could offer a solution. The Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC)’s first such facility, Badia Farms , recently launched in the glitzy emirate . The energy efficient farm system uses 90 percent less water than traditional farming , a real boon for the water-scarce region. Food imports travel around 3,000 miles on average to make it to restaurant plates in Dubai, according to the Emirates News Agency . Badia Farms could offer produce with a vastly reduced carbon footprint with their indoor hydroponic farm . Microgreens, lettuces, and herbs flourish with no sunlight, soil, or pesticides required. The greens grow in coconut husks instead, and according to The National , the produce is even safer because many potential food-borne diseases stem from dirt. Badia Farms is the very first commercial vertical farm in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC), which includes the UAE, Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, Oman, Kuwait, and Qatar. Related: The “most technologically-sophisticated commercial indoor farm in the world” will grow 30X more produce Badia Farms gets their name from the Arabic word for ‘oasis,’ according to their website. They described Dubai as “one of the world’s most dynamic yet agriculturally challenged cities” and said they’re the first company to provide greens to restaurants the same day they were harvested. Founder and CEO Omar Al Jundi said, “We set up Badia Farms in the UAE with a vision to provide a sustainable solution for food and to reduce the region’s reliance on imports. Growing crops in the region has always been a challenge due to the hostile climate, and that is where Badia Farms offers a viable solution…This is our way to give back to the UAE and start the new wave of farming in Dubai.” The Emirates News Agency said the indoor farm commenced production in December 2017. + Badia Farms Via The National and Emirates News Agency Images via Dubai Media Office Twitter

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The GCC’s first commercial vertical farm launches in Dubai

Stunning shipping container home can be yours for $125k

November 22, 2017 by  
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Architect and builder Ty Kelly wanted to disconnect from the stresses of city life in Seattle – so he built an incredible shipping container home deep in the picturesque Montana plains. The 720-square-foot home is made from plenty of reclaimed materials , and it’s currently on the market for $125,000 . The one-bedroom, one-bath home is a true example of shipping container design done right. The home design is a sophisticated blend of wood and glass. Partially clad in wooden planking on the exterior, the house has an all-glass wall that provides natural light into the interior as well as gorgeous views of the rugged Montana landscape. Further embedding the home into its stunning surroundings is the wooden flooring that extends the length of the home onto an open-air deck on the exterior. Related: You can now buy tiny shipping container homes on Amazon Although the design of the home is quite contemporary, Kelly used quite a bit of reclaimed materials in the construction. The redwood flooring and wall panels are made out of reclaimed wood, as well as the kitchen’s butcher block counters, which were made out of leftover lumber from another project. On the interior, the living space, although quite compact, is incredibly comfortable. The kitchen has a wood stove as well as the typical modern conveniences such as a dishwasher and washer and dryer. The home’s bathroom layout, however, is quite a different story. The home comes complete with an outdoor shower on the side deck that lets the homeowners truly get back to nature. Via Dwell Photos via Zillow  

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Stunning shipping container home can be yours for $125k

Massive sinkhole opens up in the middle of a Brazilian farming town

November 22, 2017 by  
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Watch your step! An enormous sinkhole has opened up in the tiny municipality of Coromandel, in the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. As Forbes  reports, the 65-foot hole appeared overnight in the thick of a local soybean farm swallowing up earth, crops, and putting some 28,000 residents on alert. While some in the area had suspected a meteor was to blame for the cavernous hollow, geologists from the Federal University of Uberlândia have confirmed the sinkhole was in fact caused by the disintegration of the town’s underlying limestone bedrock. In addition to farming soy, coffee, and corn, the region is active in mining pure calcareous limestone, a sedimentary rock that spans much of the area. The town of Coromandel, in fact, sits atop a large stretch of limestone. While the sinkhole is the first to be recorded in the area’s modern history, geologist Trevor Nace is quick to point out that its occurrence is far from abnormal and should not be considered unexpected given the region’s limestone bedrock. Related: Japanese fix massive city sinkhole within 48 hours Nace says rain is slightly acidic. “As it percolates into the ground it can, over time, dissolve calcium carbonate into calcium, carbon dioxide, and water.” He adds, “As the limestone (calcium carbonate) dissolves it leaves voids underneath the ground and eventually the overlying weight of the sediment causes the area to collapse. This collapsed feature is a sinkhole.” Nace also cites “ Poço Verde/Green Well ,” a local tourist destination that professors surmise was once a sinkhole that over time evolved into a lake. Via Forbes Images via Coromandel’s press release and Google Earth

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Massive sinkhole opens up in the middle of a Brazilian farming town

Cool micro studio in Budapest makes the most out of 344 square feet

September 25, 2017 by  
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Space-efficient design is of the utmost importance when creating livable tiny spaces like this beautiful 344-square-foot studio located in Budapest, Hungary. The compact space was designed by Studio Bunyik for the homeowner who likes to socialize at home. Using bespoke furniture pieces by local company Architecture Uncomfortable Workshop to designate individual spaces, the design team shrewdly created an open floor plan that manages to make the most out of the small interior. The micro space was outfitted with all of the comforts of home, including a fully-equipped kitchen and dining area, study, and lounge. The spaces are all divided with singular furniture pieces , creating a comfy and functional living space that doubles as an office during the day and entertaining space on the weekend. Related: At Just 150 Sq. Ft., This Tiny Real Estate Office is One of NYC’s Smallest Workplaces The wooden furniture was all hand crafted by a local furniture company, The Architecture Uncomfortable Workshop. All of the furniture was designed to give the homeowner a space for all of his hobbies and passions as well as functional pieces like his work station or wooden ladder that leads to the sleeping loft. + Studio Bunyik + Architecture Uncomfortable Workshop Via Dwell Photography via Bence Farkasinszki  

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Cool micro studio in Budapest makes the most out of 344 square feet

30-foot camper transformed into a nomadic haven with a surprisingly swanky interior

July 6, 2017 by  
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The “ Wander in the West ” crew, a five-person team that is currently traveling through the American West, turned this 30-foot camper van into a swanky home on wheels. Although the exterior was kept in its almost-original state, the interior was transformed into a sophisticated nomadic haven, perfect for experiencing life on the open road. The Winnhaven will be a comfy place to call home as the adventurous crew travel 8,700 miles through the American West. Designed to be a comfortable ride for the team, the space was strategically converted into a home on wheels thanks to collaboration from some incredibly swanky home decor and DIY brands. Related: Italian woman restores old van to travel the world with her rescue dog To revamp the living space into a cozy communal area, the team focused on creating a bright, cabin-like interior. Various seating options are available for socializing or working. Most of the walls are painted a stark white to open up the space, but there are quite a few warm touches such as the hardwood flooring and sliding bedroom door, which was covered in peel-and-stick wooden wall panels. The kitchen, although compact, was equipped with sufficient counter space and a beautiful copper sink from Sinkology , who also provided the copper basin in the tiny bathroom . The camper has a number of beds that are covered in colorful textiles influenced by the American West. Additional touches such as hanging plants and soft blankets make the Winnhaven an ideal place for team’s ongoing, on-the-road adventure. + Wander in the West + Everywhere Goods

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30-foot camper transformed into a nomadic haven with a surprisingly swanky interior

San Francisco is too expensive – so this couple hit the road in an amazing renovated van

June 14, 2017 by  
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After just four months of dating, San Francisco residents Juliana and Richmond grew weary of the city’s shockingly high real estate scene. So they decided to convert a 15-year-old Sprinter Van into 50 square feet of custom-built living space, with a recessing mechanical bed, hidden storage and a stowable tabletop. The couple spent months creating their home on wheels – lovingly called Home Sweet Van – and then they set off to explore the world. After buying the old van, the couple went to work by gutting the interior before adding new wood paneling, seating with hidden storage, and even a mechanical bed that rises on rails to the ceiling height, providing more space when not in use. Related: Living out of a van has never looked this good The traveling duo parks the converted van in various places while on the road such as local campgrounds, national forest lands, and, of course, the always popular Walmart parking lots. Although the Home Sweet Van unfortunately does not have a bathroom or shower, the couple has learned to plan their day accordingly, “You get used to planning your day around, ‘where am I going to go [to the bathroom] in the morning and where am I going to go at night,’” Richmond explained. The couple recently returned from exploring North America, but once again, have found it difficult to park in peace in their hometown of San Francisco. Now, they’re living in Oregon. If you are interested in building your own van, the couple has a digital book packed full of tips. + Home Sweet Van Via Business Insider

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San Francisco is too expensive – so this couple hit the road in an amazing renovated van

Cover’s $50k algorithmic tiny houses are 80% more efficient than conventional homes

April 26, 2017 by  
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A California-based tech company is looking to bring tiny homes to the masses by streamlining the construction process with the help of computer algorithms. Cover has developed specialized software that creates custom-made, prefabricated tiny houses that are 80% more efficient than conventional homes – all without the help of architects, planning departments, or even contractors. Cover was founded by Alexis Rivas and Jemuel Joseph in 2014. The company seeks to give everyday people the tools to create “thoughtfully designed and well-built homes” for themselves rather than enlisting the help of costly professionals. The innovative process essentially removes the need for architects, planning departments, or even contractors by guiding users through a simple 3-step process: Design, Permit, and Build. Related: Student invents computer program to help Bedouin villages build better homes Although the idea may seem a little farfetched to some, the founders believe that this is the future of DIY home building : “We’re doing for homes what Tesla is doing for the car – using technology to optimize every step of the process, from design and sales, to permitting and manufacturing.” Cover’s process uses generative design technology and algorithms to spec out various design options based on individual needs. In the design phase of the process, which costs just $250, clients fill out a digital survey providing information about their lifestyle and design preferences such as location, style, size, etc. The company then meets with the clients onsite to discuss details. The next step is feeding all of the information into a computer program that generates multiple designs options based on the information. The program is also equipped to account for geospatial data, solar positioning , and zoning requirements. After the clients choose their design, the company develops and sends “photorealistic renderings and plans” and a full quote to the client. Currently, the company’s tiny dwellings range from $50,000 to $350,000, depending on size, location, design, etc. Once the design details are worked out, the second stage is obtaining the necessary building permits, followed by laying the foundation while the prefab structure is built in a factory. Once the permits are approved, most Cover dwellings can be completed in as little as nine weeks. Cover limits material waste by manufacturing each tiny home in a factory. Additionally, using digital technology produces more energy-efficient structures. According to founder Alexis Rivas, “We’re redesigning the details that make up a home to take advantage of the precision possible in a controlled environment. This allows us to build homes that are 80 per cent more energy efficient than the average new home.” Cover homes are currently only available in Los Angeles, but the company has plans to expand to other cities in the future. + Cover Images via Cover

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