Cabin-like tiny home insulated with hemp, cotton and linen

March 18, 2020 by  
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French design firm,  Tiny House Baluchon  has just unveiled a beautiful  tiny home on wheels  that screams cabin charm. Clad in a warm red cedar exterior, the Mogote is topped with a cool azure blue aluminum roof. The interior space is kept nice and toasty thanks to its natural insulation, made of cotton, linen and hemp. Just under 20 feet long, the gorgeous  tiny home on wheels has two glass doors that lead into the interior. The living space is light and airy, with lightly-hued spruce panels. Exposed wooden beams add a strong cabin vibe throughout the main space. Related: This tiny farmhouse features a quaint reading nook The sliding glass doors open up to the main living area, which has enough space for a fold-out sofa that sleeps two. Next to the sofa is a spruce and oak kitchen that is fully equipped for whipping up some tasty meals. Multiple shelves and cabinetry help keep the space clutter-free. Across from the kitchen, a dinette set comfortably seats three people and can be  folded down  when not in use. Also located on the bottom floor is the bathroom, which is equipped with a stand-up shower,  dry toilet  and a small cabinet with a small black sink. For such a tiny space, the bathroom also boasts some enviable storage. The design’s dual-pitched roofs were a strategic decision to provide a large  sleeping loft  for the Mogote. Accessed by a ladder that can be positioned flat to save space, the bedroom has plenty of room for a double bed. Additionally, the extended mezzanine space was used to install two large custom-made bookcases, that, once again, help keep the compact space neat and tidy. + Tiny House Baluchon Via New Atlas Images via Tiny House Baluchon

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Cabin-like tiny home insulated with hemp, cotton and linen

An old mall becomes an urban lagoon and public square in central Tainan

March 18, 2020 by  
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In downtown Tainan, Taiwan, MVRDV has transformed a former shopping mall into the Tainan Spring, an urban lagoon and park. Commissioned by the city government as part of an urban revitalization masterplan, the adaptive reuse project not only provides a new public space that reconnects residents with nature, but also sets an inspiring example for how defunct malls can be given new, sustainable lives. Created as part of a masterplan to rejuvenate a “T-Axis” to the East of the Tainan Canal, the Tainan Spring project includes the transformation of the former China Town Mall as well as the beautification of a kilometer-long stretch of the city’s Haian Road, now redesigned to reduce traffic and improve pedestrian access . In replacing the old mall, the architects have “meticulously recycled” the building and turned the mall’s underground parking level into a sunken public plaza with an urban pool, planting beds, playgrounds, gathering spaces and a stage for performances. A glass floor exposes part of the structure of the second basement level below to connect visitors to the history of the site.  Related: MVRDV-designed market in Taiwan will grow food on a massive green roof “In Tainan Spring, people can bathe in the overgrown remains of a shopping mall. Children will soon be swimming in the ruins of the past — how fantastic is that?” said Winy Maas, founding partner of MVRDV. “Inspired by the history of the city, both the original jungle and the water were important sources of inspiration. Tainan is a very grey city. With the reintroduction of the jungle to every place that was possible, the city is reintegrating into the surrounding landscape. That the reintroduction of greenery was an important thread in our master plan can be seen in the planting areas on Haian Road. We mixed local plant species so that they mimic the natural landscape east of Tainan. I think the city will benefit greatly from this.” In two to three years, the newly planted beds will grow into a lush garden comprising native trees, shrubs and grasses to form a tropical jungle-like environment that will help offset the urban heat island effect . Visitors can also find relief from Tainan’s tropical climate in the urban pool and mist sprayers in the summer. The pool’s water level will rise and fall in response to the rainy and dry seasons.  + MVRDV Photography by Daria Scagliola via MVRDV

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An old mall becomes an urban lagoon and public square in central Tainan

Gorgeous tiny home thrives in the California sunshine

December 27, 2019 by  
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Already well-known for its all-weather tiny home designs , Canadian studio Minimaliste is back with one breezy home for a client in California who dreamed of having a compact living space that is both comfy and mobile. The Noyer is a 331-square-foot tiny home on wheels that has a spectacular interior comprised of a living room, an office space, a kitchen, a bathroom with a composting toilet and a spacious sleeping loft. At just 331 square feet, the Noyer is a compact structure that is built on a wheeled trailer, enabling the tiny home to go mobile. Although it was specifically designed for a client in California, the Noyer, like all of Minimaliste’s designs, was built to perform just as well in warm climates as it does in colder regions . Related: The off-grid Eucalyptus tiny home radiates cool, Californian vibes The tiny house is clad in a gorgeous blend of charcoal-colored steel siding and cedar cladding . The shape of the Noyer is marked by its sloped roof, which was strategic in providing more room for the sleeping loft. Inside, bright white walls contrast nicely with the wooden ceiling and flooring. The entryway includes a small lounge area with an inbuilt bench facing the kitchen. A small table off to the side pulls double duty as either an office desk or a dining table . Like the rest of the home, this space has plenty of storage to keep it clutter-free. Home cooks will love the modern design of the kitchen, which has been painted black to stand out from the rest of the interior. The preparation area comes fully equipped with all of the amenities needed to whip up a tasty meal, including a full-sized refrigerator, a dishwasher, a stove top, plenty of counterspace and a dreamy farmhouse sink. Just past the kitchen, the main living area is elevated off the ground floor by a few steps. It is quite spacious for a tiny home and includes a small sofa centered around an entertainment shelf. A large, square window frames the views of wherever the Noyer is parked. On the other side of the home, there is a small bathroom with a stand-up shower, a composting toilet and a two-in-one, washer-dryer combo. Above this space, built-in stairs lead up to the sleeping loft, which is large enough to fit a queen-sized bed and a bedside table on each side. There is also a platform next to the loft area that enables the homeowners to change while standing in front of the wardrobe — a novelty in tiny home design. + Minimaliste Via Tiny House Talk Images via Minimaliste

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Gorgeous tiny home thrives in the California sunshine

A family builds an impressive, 300-square-foot tiny home to travel the world

December 3, 2019 by  
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It’s the freedom to travel that continues to push the tiny home trend. Families like Bela, Spencer and their young daughter, Escher, are able to enjoy a minimalist lifestyle while also exploring the world whenever they get the urge to get up and go. What’s more, this family’s custom tiny home on wheels , as functional as it is beautiful, features all of the creature comforts of a contemporary home. Bela and Spencer began their love affair with tiny home living on their honeymoon, where they spent a few days off the grid in a quaint cottage in Appalachia. The experience stayed with them for years, even as they found themselves paying a whopping $2,300 a month to rent a studio apartment in Redwood City years later. Related: Newlyweds forgo pricey wedding to embark on an incredible tiny home adventure Wanting a better life that would allow them to travel with their new addition, baby Escher, the couple decided to embark on a DIY tiny home project. Once they located an idyllic spot in the mountains of Santa Cruz, California, they got to work building the tiny home of their dreams. The couple decided to approach each design step by focusing on spatial awareness and functionality instead of the limited square footage. This focus allowed them to create functional, custom spaces that best suited their own needs as a family. The finished tiny home on wheels features an expansive, open-air deck, complete with a comfortable lounge space, dining set and barbecue grill. The family spends quite a bit of time here, enjoying the views and fresh mountain air. The entrance is through a glass garage door that opens vertically and connects the interior to the front deck. Interestingly, the interior layout was designed to have nine distinct living spaces, each one separated from the other by either a difference in level (steps or a ladder) or a soft partition of some sort (glass door, curtain or shoji paper). This strategy allows each section to have a unique purpose. The ground floor features a living room and high-top dining table that looks out a window over the landscape. The fully equipped kitchen, with a striking copper backsplash, is elevated off the ground by a short staircase that slides out of the wall to create storage space . Behind the kitchen is the master bedroom, which, like the rest of the home, benefits from an abundance of natural light. The queen-sized bed is built on hydraulic lids, enabling it to fold up to reveal more storage underneath. On the other side of the home, a spacious bathroom with a composting toilet features a lovely, spa-like shower stall. Above this area is an L-shaped loft accessible by a ladder. This upper level houses two distinct spaces: an extra bedroom and storage. + This X Life Via Living Big in a Tiny House Photography by Bela Fishbeyn; family photos by Ryan Tuttle

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A family builds an impressive, 300-square-foot tiny home to travel the world

This amazing tiny solar-powered cabin can be used as a retreat on land or on water

November 1, 2019 by  
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Many tiny home designers are guided by the principles of flexibility when it comes to being mobile, but rarely have we seen a tiny home creation that can be enjoyed on land and on water. Designed and built by our new hero, Scott Cronk , the Heidi-Ho, is a beautiful solar-powered tiny cabin built on a 30-foot pontoon. According to Scott, the ingenious floating home creation was inspired by his need to explore the world on his own terms, “After wildfires in the Fall of 2017, I sold my home in Santa Rosa, Northern California, and moved to the Palm Springs area, Southern California,” he explained. “This houseboat is a way for me to spend my summers visiting friends in Northern California.” Related: The Tiny Sweet Pea is the First Houseboat to be Certified by Build Green The Heidi-Ho houseboat was built on a 30-foot long pontoon boat that can be pulled by a trailer. In fact, one of the driving forces behind the flexibility of the tiny home design was that it was an acceptable size for legal road transport. Accordingly, the deck is capable of being reduced to just 8.5 feet wide. In addition to being road ready, the entire cabin can also be removed from the boat deck to be used as a camping trailer. And although this may have been considered limiting to some, Scott took on the challenge head on and created a spectacular living space. Although compact, the tiny cabin boasts a comfy living and sleeping area, complete with all of the basics. The interior is light and airy, with wood-paneled walls and plenty of natural light . The interior living space is made up of custom-made bench seating, a removable dining table and a galley kitchen. All in all, the compact cabin can sleep three. The main sleeping area is created by transforming the dining table into a double bed. Then, a bunk bed drops down from the ceiling for additional sleeping space. The kitchen has everything needed to create tasty meals, including a three-burner stove top and oven and a refrigerator. Additionally, there is plenty of storage for kitchenware as well as clothing and equipment found throughout the tiny home. Adding space to the design, the cabin features dual rear doors that can be fully opened. The doors lead out to the pontoon platform , creating a nice open-air space with boat seats to enjoy. To make his home on water eco-friendly, the boat runs on solar power generated by a 175W solar panel. Additionally, the boat’s bathroom features a composting toilet. + Scott Cronk Via Curbed Photography by Granite Peak Photography

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This amazing tiny solar-powered cabin can be used as a retreat on land or on water

Foie gras ban to take effect in New York

November 1, 2019 by  
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Fancy feasters in the Big Apple will have to acquire new tastes because New York will soon follow California’s example in legislating for a foie gras ban. Earlier this week, the New York City Council passed a bill calling for the ban, and Mayor Bill de Blasio will soon sign it into law. Animal activists have been rejoicing, calling the new legislation a win, although it won’t take effect until 2022. Those not in compliance by then will face a $2,000 penalty fine per violation. Foie gras is a rich, extravagant dish that has been appreciated since Ancient Roman times. The French have even defended it via article L654 of France’s 2006 Rural Code, which states, “Foie gras is part of the protected cultural and gastronomic heritage of France.” Related: Foie gras ban in California stands after court battle But foie gras production has met with criticism from animal welfare advocates. Foie gras is produced by forced overfeeding of ducks or geese to fatten and enlarge their livers. Feed volume is in excess of a bird’s normal voluntary intake, making the process unnatural because it overrides a bird’s typical preferences and homeostasis. The Canadian Veterinary Journal , for instance, has documented that this unnatural overfeeding process spans a two-week period and involves “repeated capture, restraint and rapid insertion of the feeding tube” that causes discomfort and increased risks for esophageal injury and associated pain. All of this produces a duck or goose liver that is “seven to 19 times the size of a normal liver with an average weight of 550 to 982 grams and a fat content of 55.8 percent,” while a normal liver is just “76 grams with a fat content of 6.6 percent.” In 1998, The European Commission recognized that these force-fed birds were up to 20 times more likely to reach mortality than their normal counterparts. If the same fatty cell buildup would occur in humans, it would be likened to alcohol abuse or obesity. New York’s ban follows at the heels of California’s foie gras ban. The Golden State’s legislation, however, has met some choppy waters. Initially passed in 2012, it was later overturned in 2015, then upheld by a circuit court judge in 2017, followed by further support earlier this year when the Supreme Court ruled in favor of California’s ban. On the other hand, Chicago’s ban on the delicacy was not so successful. Passed in 2006, it was repealed by 2008 via concerted efforts from foie gras producers, celebrity chefs and high-end restaurants that pushed back to sway public opinion. Their lobby strategies centered around the argument that if the foie gras ban persists, then other delicacies like lobster and veal might be in jeopardy, too. Chicago’s former mayor, Richard Daley, eventually called the ban “the silliest ordinance” his city’s council ever had, making the Windy City “the laughingstock of the nation.” It remains to be seen whether New York’s foie gras ban will succeed like California’s or be overturned like the ban in Chicago. Via Time and Fast Company Image via T.Tseng

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Foie gras ban to take effect in New York

Old van converted into solar-powered bohemian beach hut on wheels

October 28, 2019 by  
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British designers Supertramped Co. have converted an old Mercedes-Benz T2 van into an incredible bohemian-inspired home on wheels. Ernie is a bright blue and white van that has been completely renovated with a fun, shabby chic interior design that  not only includes some whimsical beachy decor, but also an array of 400-watt solar panels that allow the beautiful camper to go off grid virtually anywhere. The Mercedes-Benz T2 vans were produced by Daimler-Benz from 1967 to 1996, and the boxy, durable vehicles were often used as ambulances or delivery trucks.  The vans were also known for their smooth maneuverability, something that, along with its compact shape, makes them the perfect type of van to convert into a vibrant home on wheels. Related: Amazing camper van maximizes space with clever boat design tricks According to the Somerset-based designers, the clients approached them with the idea of a surf-inspired mobile beach hut that would serve as their tiny home on wheels while exploring the world. Inspired by the sea and trajectory of the van, designers went to work and created Ernie— a beautiful camper van that runs on solar power. The exterior of the van is a bright blue and white, paying homage to the typical large striped umbrellas found on the sea side. The beachy theme continues throughout the interior with a fun, shabby-chic interior design . The walls are clad in rustic wooden panels punctuated with plenty of large windows, giving the space a warm atmosphere . The main living area is a compact, but cozy space with bench seating and dining table that sits across from the kitchen. Throughout the tiny space, fun decor made up of seashells and starfish trinkets add a bit of whimsy to the design. Like most camper van conversions, the design for the kitchen space has to be functional and space-efficient, and Ernie delivers in spades. The main area is  equipped with a fridge/freezer combo, stove top and oven. comprised of whitewashed cabinetry with a vibrant blue and white backsplash. A farmhouse sink adds a nice country style touch to the seaside vibe. Further past the kitchen is a small bathroom with full shower and marine toilet. However, the shower stall is incredibly original, featuring exposed pipes, subway tiled-inspired wooden wallboards, a giant skylight above that lets in tons of natural light . The sleeping space is located in the very back of the camper. A bed platform is set up with plenty of storage for sporting equipment, clothing, etc. underneath. A pair of dual doors open outward to take in the unobstructed views. In contrast to its warm, laid-back interior, Ernie also boasts a very hightech system. The van was installed with several modern features such as Alexa-controlled lighting, a surround sound system, WiFi, UV water sterilizer, led lights and a 400-watt solar array . + Supertramped Co. Via Curbed Photography by Simon and Kiana Photography

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Old van converted into solar-powered bohemian beach hut on wheels

Prefab houseboat in Prague features a spacious rooftop lounge

September 9, 2019 by  
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Normally, Czech Republic-based firm Freedomky stays busy building charming, energy-efficient, tiny cabins. But when the team was approached by a client looking to “live freely” on the water, the designers used the same space- and energy-saving techniques they use frequently to build Freedomky No. 59, a prefab houseboat with a flexible interior design that can be used as a work space or vacation home. Designed in collaboration with architectural studio Atelier Št?pán , the Freedomky houseboat was directly created with the client’s love of adventure in mind. As a fan of the company’s cabin designs, the client, who spent time in various glamping locations across Europe, wanted the architects to design something that would allow him to set up a home in Prague. The man wanted to be close to the center of the city without feeling the congestion of the highly trafficked area. Hence, the design team and the client decided to take it to the water. Related: A solar-powered houseboat designed for the water-loving adventurer The houseboat is a prefabricated structure comprised of two modules placed on a custom steel pontoon. The two separate units were joined together at a shipyard 25 miles north of Prague . Once the prefab construction was complete, the individual pieces were towed by boat to the home’s final installation site in the district of Smíchov in Prague. The journey took 18 hours, with the housing components passing under 14 bridges, including the famous Charles Bridge. Made with the same materials as Freedomky’s cabins, the boat’s exterior walls are crafted from eco-friendly wood or wooden components. Because of the humid environment, the designers replaced the larch facade normally used on their cabins with durable cement fiber boards. Working within the company motto of “free art of living everywhere,” the Freedomky team went to work designing a floating home with a breathtaking interior customized to the owner’s needs. The main objective was to create a flexible space, where the houseboat could be used as an office, an upscale living area or a weekend stay for guests. The interior of the houseboat is bright and airy, with modern furnishings that are flexible in their uses. The dining table can also be used as a work center, for example. The walls throughout the boat are painted a bright white, and the interior benefits from the natural light that pours in from the sliding glass doors and plentiful windows. At the owner’s request, there is a large rooftop terrace , which can be planted with vegetation. + Freedomky Via Dwell Photography by Lukas Pelech via Freedomky

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Prefab houseboat in Prague features a spacious rooftop lounge

Ingenious design sees two tiny homes connected by a light-filled sunroom

June 21, 2019 by  
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When a family of four moved from Hawaii to Portland, Oregon, they desperately missed the tropical climate that surrounded their previous home. To find a solution, they turned to architect Brian Crabb of VIVA Collectiv , who came up with the idea to connect two tiny homes with a warm, light-filled sunroom. The Ohana (which means “family” in Hawaiian) is comprised of two 176-square-foot tiny homes set on 24 x 8 trailers. The structures were placed side by side, separated by spacious, glass-enclosed sunroom that adds another 247 square feet to the design. Related: A micro home in one of Quebec’s regional parks offers a unique way to enjoy the outdoors Coming in at just 600 square feet of living space, the layout allows for something rarely seen in a tiny home — privacy. The right trailer holds the living room and the two children’s bedrooms, while the left trailer houses the kitchen and master bedroom. A surprisingly large bathroom is located adjacent to the kitchen and comes with a soaking tub and unique tile work. At the heart of the home, of course, is the bright sunroom. The glass-enclosed structure even has a pitched roof , which allows the family to feel as though they are enjoying the outdoors even if the weather isn’t favorable. Although the design is much larger than other tiny homes, the home was installed with a number of standard space-saving features. There is built-in storage found throughout, and the kitchen has plenty of counter space and cupboards. In the master bedroom, the queen-sized bed has a trundle bed tucked underneath. Architect Brian Crabb explained to TreeHugger that the incredible home design was inspired by the warm, Hawaiian climate. “The home was designed for a young family of four originally from Hawaii, but living outside of Portland, Oregon,” Crabb said. “Living in the Pacific Northwest, they found they really missed the tropical climate and all it affords, so their request was to create a home where they could enjoy the ‘outdoors’ year-round. The sunroom was designed as a communal space for the family to enjoy together, while the parents’ and children’s bedrooms are located in separate trailers. This separation allows for some semblance of privacy while still enjoying the fruits of going tiny.” + VIVA Collectiv Via Treehugger Photography by Craig Williams via VIVA Collectiv

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Ingenious design sees two tiny homes connected by a light-filled sunroom

Beautiful solar-powered minimalist cabins are clad in locally sourced charred timber

June 5, 2019 by  
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Bordeaux-based firm  A6A has unveiled beautiful minimalist cabins designed to be almost completely self-sufficient thanks to solar power and a micro wastewater treatment system. Additionally, the 236-square-foot H-Eva Cabins are prefabricated offsite to reduce construction and impact on the environment. Lightweight, but sturdy, the tiny cabins are clad in locally sourced timber that has been charred through the ancient Japanese technique Shou Sugi Ban. The minimalist cabin design comes in three sizes and can be customized to connect multiple to make a larger structure. All of the cabins are prefabricated in a workshop to reduce the structures’ impact on their intended landscape. Once built, they are delivered to the destination on a flatbed truck and easily installed with a crane. The structures are placed lightly on the land so that they can be disassembled quickly, leaving little-to-no footprint behind. Related: These low-energy prefab cabins are inspired by the Nordic concept of ‘friluftsliv’ In addition to their eco-friendly assembly process, the cabins are designed to go off the grid. A rooftop solar array generates energy to power the cabin’s minimal electricity needs. Heat is provided by a wood-burning stove, and natural light is more than enough to illuminate the interior during the daytime. In addition to the low-flow faucets in the shower and kitchen, the bathrooms are also installed with dry toilets to conserve water. To further add to its sustainability, the cabins have integrated micro wastewater treatment systems. The exterior is clad in locally sourced Douglas fir that has been charred through the ancient Japanese technique  Shou Sugi Ban , which adds resilience to the cabin. The deep black color also helps camouflage the design into nearly any backdrop, letting the residents truly immerse themselves in their surroundings. The rectangular volumes are punctuated by several slender windows and large sliding glass doors. The interior living spaces are clad in natural plywood. The central living rooms are complete with a family-style table that can easily be moved outdoors on the wooden deck, creating the perfect spot for taking in the incredible views while dining. A small kitchenette, although compact, comes with all of the basics. The sleeping space is comprised of two large bunk beds integrated into the walls. + A6A Via Archdaily Photography by Agnès Clotis via A6A

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Beautiful solar-powered minimalist cabins are clad in locally sourced charred timber

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