Hello Wood unveils a tiny cabin that sleeps up to 8 people

February 19, 2020 by  
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Most cabins are designed to let people enjoy a bit of quiet time, away from the hustle and bustle of everyday life. However, for those social butterflies who believe that getting back to nature doesn’t have to mean sacrificing time with friends, Hello Wood has created the beautiful Grand Cabin. Located near Csóromfölde, Hungary, the cabin’s looming A-frame volume was built from panels of prefab wood . Although the pitched-roof shape was inspired by traditional Czech-style mountain lodges, the cabin has an undoubtedly modern aesthetic thanks to the two blue and red capsules that flank the cabin’s jet-black exterior. Related: Solar-powered POP-UP Park takes over underused Budapest square The entrance to the cabin is through a cathedral-like entrance created out of multiple glass panels, which flood the interior with natural light . At first sight, the interior living space looks like any typical cabin of a similar build, but this cozy, 324-square-foot retreat actually sleeps up to eight people comfortably, far more than similar cabins of this size. The minimalist interior is comprised of one open central area, which is arranged to be the social, shared space. However, on either side of this main room, there are a number of room dividers that can be used to create additional sleeping quarters. Additionally, the two colorful boxes seen from the exterior are actually two large bedrooms with built-in bed platforms. According to the Hello Wood team, the Grand Cabin was designed to not only provide a serene space for people looking to reconnect with nature from the comfort of a beautiful tiny cabin but also to provide a way that they can do just that while being surrounded by friends and family. The studio said, “Our concept is about a small cabin that contains a fully equipped community space inside by expanding the A-frame with sleeping capsules — fitting 8+ people. It’s a house for you and all your friends.” + Hello Wood Via Apartment Therapy Photography by Tamás Bujnovszky via Hello Wood

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Hello Wood unveils a tiny cabin that sleeps up to 8 people

Bamboo electric bike is designed for Kathmandu locals and tourists

February 19, 2020 by  
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Designer and Fulbright scholar Lance Rake has teamed up with local bamboo builders at Abari in Kathmandu to design an electric cargo bike made out of sustainable materials. The resulting design is the Habre Eco Bike, a three-wheeled bicycle made out of locally sourced bamboo that was strategically crafted to provide locals and tourists with an alternative vehicle that would not only let them move around town easily but would also help reduce the city’s notorious pollution. Kathmandu is considered one of the most polluted cities in Asia. On most days, its hectic streets are filled bumper-to-bumper with gas-guzzling vehicles that add to the air contamination levels, which have begun to affect the city’s famed historic sites. Related: BIY 2 lets you build your own bamboo bicycle in just five hours In 2019, Rake was granted a global Fulbright to develop a solution to the burgeoning pollution issue. Working with local designers from Abari, who are specialists in bamboo architecture, Rake came up with an electric bicycle with a purpose that would be two-fold: help the locals make eco-friendly deliveries around the city and act as a sort of tuk-tuk-like taxi to transport tourists looking to explore various Kathmandu landmarks. Working with local artisans and materials, Rake and Abari founder Nripal Adhikari went through several stages while designing the Habre Eco Bike. Kathmandu’s streets are not always paved smoothly, and there are several steep areas. Therefore, the bike had to be sturdy and rugged enough to withstand the intense urban traffic as well as rough, rural landscapes. Often working with scarce tools and relying on the skills of local builders, the final prototype was developed out of a steel platform that was turned into the frame for the three-wheeled cargo bike. Regional bamboo was then tested in various conditions to find the best configuration that would provide optimal handling and comfort. Once the main frame had been designed, the team went on to build the large front basket, which can be used for passenger seating or cargo space. + Abari + Lance Rake Images via Lance Rake

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Bamboo electric bike is designed for Kathmandu locals and tourists

Yosemite camping site unveils series of ADA-compliant tiny cabins

September 20, 2019 by  
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Taking a vacation in a tiny cabin in a remote area of the world appeals to all sorts of people, but there’s one group who has been largely left out of the movement — people with disabilities. Thankfully, one forward-thinking firm is changing that with their sleek tiny cabin design that is accessible for all. Los Angeles-based firm, M-Rad has unveiled their new X-suite cabin, an accessible tiny retreat that combines universal design with sophisticated aesthetic. Built specifically for Autocamp Yosemite, a 35-acre glamping site in northern California, the firm installed five X- suite cabins on the edge of a small lake, surrounded by the breathtaking Yosemite landscape. The cabins are all designed to comply with the American with Disabilities Act (ADA). Related: Wheelchair-friendly tiny house proves universal design can be cool The 270-square-foot prefabricated cabins have wooden frames wrapped in  dark-hued metal rainscreens topped with metal roofs. Designed to be transportable, the cabins sit on top of steel chassis with wheels. This enables the cabins to not only be moved easier to another location, but also reduces impact on the landscape. The entrance to each cabin is through a wooden open-air deck that doubles as a ramp. Double-entry French doors that are wide enough for large wheelchairs lead into the interior living space. The interior of the cabins feature rectangular layouts, with a large open-plan living area and a kitchen. Ultra-large glazed walls flood the interior with natural light.  The bedroom, which has enough space for a queen-sized bed, not only has a massive floor-to-ceiling window, but an oversized skylight that allows for stargazing while drifting off to sleep. The kitchens offer all of the necessary amenities that are on a reachable level, as well as a small dining area on the interior. The open-air decks also feature enough space for dining al fresco while enjoying the incredible views. Although the cabins may seem to be a minimalist design, in reality, the cabins were purpose-built to be accessible for everyone without sacrificing on design. Large, spacious thresholds, as well as wide rooms, allow enough space for wheelchairs to turn around in. Additionally, the bathroom was built to adhere to ADA standards such as a shower with a handlebar and seat. Throughout the home, windows, doors, knobs, etc. are also ADA compliant. + M-Rad Via Dezeen Images via M-Rad

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Yosemite camping site unveils series of ADA-compliant tiny cabins

One-room tiny cabin is a minimalist refuge deep in the Brazilian forest

December 20, 2018 by  
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São Paulo-based architect Silvia Acar Arquitetura has unveiled a tiny minimalist cabin tucked into a lush Brazilian forest. Camouflaged in the tree canopy and set off the ground on stilts, the one-room Chalet L is a simple, 67-square-feet one-room cabin, entirely designed to offer the basics while disconnecting from the usual hustle and bustles of life. Located in the most southeastern part of São Paulo, the tiny cabin is located in an idyllic valley, surrounded by a dense forest filled with soaring trees and greenery. The cabin is lifted off the ground to reduce impact on the natural landscape. Being lifted off the ground also gave the architect the opportunity to orientate the cabin’s large glazed facade to face the best views of the mountains across of the valley. Related: Disconnect in these A-frame tiny cabins in the Catskills Chalet L is made out of steel frames and clad in “a cementitious slab on the sides” which were used to insulate the tiny structure to help the interior space maintain a comfortable temperature year round. The roof was built out of metallic layered tiles, which were used to add extra insulation to help keep the interior space cozy. There are no roads or walkways that provide access to the cabin. Instead, a simple walking trail leads to the structure, which is camouflaged into the tree canopy. Inside the cabin is minimalist space with just one room with light plywood cladding used on the walls. At the heart of the design is the large floor-to-ceiling glazed wall that provides unobstructed views of the forest and mountain range in the distance. The furnishings are sparse, just a bed, desk, sink and built-in nightstand provide the basic necessities needed to enjoy the small refuge. + Silvia Acar Arquitetura Via Archdaily Photography by André Scarpa

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A remote, off-grid cabin is elevated off the forest floor with log columns

November 15, 2018 by  
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Panama-based architect Jose Isturaín (JiA) has built a beautiful tiny cabin tucked into a remote, mountainous area in Panama. With the help of local builders as well as his own family, Isturaín constructed Cabin 192 atop pine columns to elevate the glass-enclosed structure off the landscape to reduce its environmental impact . Located in Altos del María, a mountainous region about two hours outside of Panama City, the cabin is the first structure of what will eventually be a family retreat consisting of a main house and three individual cabins. Tucked deep into a wooded forest, the idyllic area offers a serene respite from the hustle and bustle of the city. Related: A cluster of wooden cabins create a serene weekend retreat in Norway Working with local builders, as well as his family and friends, Isturaín envisioned a cabin that would “transmit the peace and tranquility that simplicity offers, an elementary architecture.” Accordingly, he decided to forgo any type of ostentatious design, instead opting for an off-grid cabin  that would put preserving the natural landscape at the forefront of the project. The cabin’s frame was built from  reclaimed pine wood beams and columns felled on site. Pine trees are not native to the area, so the decision was made to use this wood for the cabins and a perimeter fence. The team reforested the surrounding area with native species that would help provide shade to the home and improve the local environment. Using the basics of tropical architecture, Isturaín designed the tiny cabin to not only be off-grid, but also resilient to the local climate . Raising the main living space off the ground certainly helped to preserve the natural landscape underneath. But by elevating the home off of the natural soil, it also helped keep the tropical humidity at bay. The roof is covered with a slanted metal mooring structure that juts out substantially over the cabin’s perimeter, a strategic feature that will help cool the interior space during the hot and humid summer months. The ground floor of the  cabin is actually an open, 226-square-foot space with no walls, just pine columns that mark the perimeter. The covered, open-air living area has a small kitchenette, dining table and ample seating, the perfect space for family gatherings. The bedroom and bathroom are located on the upper floor, which is a very compact 387 square feet. Large floor-to-ceiling windows illuminate the space with natural light . Facing out over the surrounding forest, large sliding doors open completely, further connecting the structure with its forested surroundings. + JiA Via Archdaily Photography by Alfredo Martiz and Nadine Sam via JiA

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A remote, off-grid cabin is elevated off the forest floor with log columns

Get away from it all in this tiny hut tucked into a Lithuanian forest

October 18, 2018 by  
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Designed by Ema Butrimaviciute of Lithuanian studio  Utopium , the Etno Hut is a 150-square-foot,  off-grid retreat tucked into a remote forest in Lithuania. Surrounded by breathtaking vistas, the tiny cabin, which was built with minimal impact to the landscape, is designed to provide a serene retreat for those looking to reconnect with nature. The cabin’s location, set in an expansive forest that sits between two Lithuanian cities, was strategic to its use. Wanting to provide city-goers with a serene weekend escape , the architect imagined a quiet retreat where anyone can escape from the hustle and bustle of city life without the inconvenience of driving for hours to get there. Related: Tiny ‘hut on wheels’ is the perfect vacation home to escape the concrete jungle Tucked into the edge of an expansive, lush forest, the tiny cabin was built on a slope facing south. Its orientation was strategic to take advantage of the sunshine and stunning views. The structure was built on a steel foundation screwed into the ground by hand as to minimize impact on the landscape. The entire hut, which was constructed out of Structural Insulated Panels (SIPs), was assembled in just three days. From a distance, the 150-square-foot cabin is virtually camouflaged into the forest backdrop thanks to its dark black facade. A large open-air deck leads to sliding glass doors that open wide to create a seamless connection with the landscape. On the interior, white walls and wood flooring brighten the modern living space. The cabin has a king-sized bed and a pull-out bed, a bathroom with a shower and a fully-equipped kitchenette. The space is meant to provide a relaxing atmosphere, with no transformable furniture or ladders — just everything needed for simple, uncomplicated living. + Utopium Via Archdaily Images via Utopium

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Get away from it all in this tiny hut tucked into a Lithuanian forest

Prefab DublDom home delivered via helicopter as a gift to a remote Russian town

June 19, 2018 by  
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Moscow-based design studio BIO Architects has installed its latest prefab DublDom in the snowy mountains of Kandalaksha, a ski town in northeastern Russia. The DublDom was installed as a gift for the town after resident Alexander Trunkovkiy won the competition “Find Your Place 2016,” which asked participants to submit location proposals for a DublDom and explain how a prefab home would benefit the area. Lifted into place by helicopter, this new tiny cabin in Kandalaksha serves as a shelter for tourists who flock to the mountainous region for outdoor recreation. Alexander Trunkovkiy’s winning competition entry was selected from more than 500 submissions. Trunkovkiy made a persuasive case when he implored BIO Architects to install a DublDom as a replacement for a mountain shelter that had burned down. The DublDom, he said, would serve as a place where townspeople and visitors could rest while enjoying skiing in winter, hiking in summer and views of the mountains year-round. Clad in bright red panels, the tiny cabin in Kandalaksha uses the standard DublDom modules but with a reconfigured interior optimized for high-altitude use. The lightweight,  prefab structure was constructed to the highest standards of durability and energy efficiency and then dropped into place by helicopter. “Due to combining high-tech materials, we managed to halve the weight of the modules,” the architects said. “The materials and the coating are calculated to be used at the low temperatures and high wind loads.” Related: Tiny and Affordable Russian DublDom Home Can Be Assembled in Just One Day Elevated on six pillars, the metal-framed mountain shelter comfortably accommodates up to eight people. The interior is minimally furnished with a warming stove and table in the center flanked by rack-beds on the perimeter of the large central room. The space beneath the beds is used for storage. A glazed, gabled end wall provides passive heating and panoramic views of the southern Kandalaksha gulf and islands. + BIO Architects Via ArchDaily Images by Art Lasovsky

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Prefab DublDom home delivered via helicopter as a gift to a remote Russian town

Minimalist cabin in the Chilean mountains lets climbers escape the daily grind

March 2, 2018 by  
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Chilean architect Lorena Troncoso-Valencia designed a serene wooden refuge deep in the Chilean mountains. The architect – who specializes in sustainable habitats – created the wooden PV Cabin as a refuge for the many mountain climbers that come to explore the rugged terrain of Las Trancas, Pinto. Built on wooden piles, the 260-square foot cabin is raised almost five feet above the natural terrain to reduce its environmental impact. The design of the beautiful wooden cabin is geared towards the many active travelers that visit the region, known for its variety of extreme sports. Hikers, skiers, and mountain climbers often spend days or weeks exploring the adjacent mountain range. Related: Hike to This Beautiful Rustic Cabin and Take Refuge Deep in the Norwegian Mountains The 260-square foot structure is located on a small lot accessed by a winding road that juts through a deep forestscape. The rugged terrain limited the structure’s potential surface area , so the architect took the design vertical. The interior space was essentially doubled by expanding the space to double height, creating a wooden homage to the natural rock walls found out in the surrounding area. A glazed front wall floods the interior with optimal natural light and provides stunning views of the surroundings. On the inside, the living area, kitchen, bathroom and a small workspace are located on the first floor, with a “floating” sleeping loft on the second floor, reachable by ladder. Designed to be used as a temporary refuge by itinerant visitors exploring the area, the space is minimal but comfortable. Although the cabin design is a beautiful structure, the materials used in the cabin were also chosen for their resilience . A strong wooden shell that would withstand the harsh elements was essential, as was the asymmetrical roof, which allows for snow drainage. + Lorena Troncoso-Valencia Via Archdaily Photography by Cristóbal Caro / Lorena Troncoso-Valencia

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Minimalist cabin in the Chilean mountains lets climbers escape the daily grind

Get off the grid in style with the mini solar-powered Wave Eco Cabin

December 4, 2015 by  
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Get off the grid in style with the mini solar-powered Wave Eco Cabin

Camouflaged Thoreau cabin in the woods of Utrecht has no running water or electricity

November 24, 2015 by  
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