The minimalist Yoshino Cedar House was built entirely out of locally-sourced timber

June 15, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

The beautiful Yoshino Cedar House , located near Osaka, was built by local carpenters and craftsmen with sustainable cedar harvested from the nearby mountains. The community-run retreat was created through a collaboration between Airbnb designers, Samara and architects Go Hasegawa . The team sought to foster the local community while providing a much-needed source of income for the town. The cedar retreat’s design was part of the 2016 event, Kenya Hara’s House Vision , an exhibition that showcases community-led housing projects that aim to help small towns boost their economies. Like a lot of rural areas in Japan, the small town of Yoshino has an aging population that is dwindling by the day. For years, the town’s principal industry was sustainable forestry , but without young workers working to enter the workforce, the town’s only economic boost these days is its annual cherry blossom festival. Related: Circular garden walkway cuts straight through Japanese timber home From the start of the Cedar House project, the architects and designers worked with locals every step of the way. Local foresters, woodcutters and carpenters collaborated on the process, from harvesting and cutting the timber to its construction. According to the architects, the design of the Yoshino Cedar House, which is technically owned and operated by the community, was meant to pay homage to the area’s local traditions as well as foster new relationships between residents, “Every detail of the structure inspires connection to the people of Yoshino and their underlying traditions.” Located on the bank of the Yoshino River, the structure is clad on the interior and exterior in warm-hued cedar planks whose intricate patterns create a calming, peaceful environment. The bottom floor, with a single table built into the floor, houses the living and dining space. An open staircase leads to two separate bedrooms on the second floor. The simple, uncluttered rooms have one mattress and a small table and are beautifully illuminated by natural light coming through the structure’s A-frame window. Since its inauguration, local townspeople take care of the Airbnb retreat ‘s rental operation and all proceeds are used to support the community. + Go Hasegawa + Samara Via Dwell Photography via Airbnb

Read the original here: 
The minimalist Yoshino Cedar House was built entirely out of locally-sourced timber

Global coal production falls 6.2% in the biggest decline in history

June 15, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

U.S. President Donald Trump may believe coal is the future , but newly-released statistics by BP Statistical Review of Energy state otherwise. According to the data, global coal production fell by an astonishing 6.2 percent last year — the largest annual decline on record. Additionally, consumption decreased for the second year in a row, dropping 1.7 percent. In wake of these findings, it should come as no surprise that once again, renewables were the fastest growing energy source, growing by a whopping 12 percent — a statistic which represents the largest annual incremental increase in output on record. The report , entitled “Energy markets in transition: BP Statistical Review shows long-term shifts underway,” concluded that the oil market is declining because fast-growing markets are shifting “towards lower carbon fuels as renewable energy continues to grow strongly and coal use falls.” The report also showed that the shift from coal is widespread. The UK, for instance, consumed 52.5 percent less in 2016, the U.S. experienced an 8.8 percent dip in consumption and China’s reliance dropped by 1.6 percent. Evidence to support these conclusions abound. For instance, the UK recently experienced its first coal-free day since the Industrial Revolution. India also intends to halt all coal plant production in the near future, as renewable technologies have become more affordable. Related: U.S. coal production dips to lowest point in 35 years due to rise of renewable energy sources Bob Dudley, BP Group Chief Executive, said, “Global energy markets are in transition. The longer-term trends we can see in this data are changing the patterns of demand and the mix of supply as the world works to meet the challenge of supplying the energy it needs while also reducing carbon emissions . At the same time markets are responding to shorter-run run factors, most notably the oversupply that has weighed on oil prices for the past three years.” As was previously mentioned, renewable energy was the fastest growing of all energy sources, increasing by 12 percent. Though solar, wind and other renewable energy sources provide only 4 percent of the world’s total energy, the increase represents almost one-third of the total growth in energy demand in 2016. Despite certain leaders’ opposition to renewable energy investments, it seems clear the future is green and that consumers will continue to invest in energy sources that are beneficial for the environment, wildlife, and future generations – and their bottom line. + BP Statistical Review of Energy Images via Pixabay

See original here: 
Global coal production falls 6.2% in the biggest decline in history

Dreamy treehouse hidden by Woodstock offers magnificent Catskills views

June 15, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

A perfect getaway surrounded by nature is hidden away near the town of Woodstock. UK-based Antony Gibbon Designs crafted this blissful retreat, called Inhabit Treehouse, that’s nestled within dense forest less than a two-hour drive from New York City. Built from locally and sustainably sourced reclaimed timber , Inhabit treehouse offers beautiful and cozy digs with stunning views of a lake and the Catskills mountain range beyond. Built for a family with plans of opening the treehouse up to rentals, Inhabit Treehouse is a small and efficiently designed space with all the comforts of home. FSC-certified reclaimed cedar sourced from the Catskills valley clads the treehouse , while FSC-certified reclaimed pine lines the interior. The timber facade will develop an attractive patina over time to help the building blend into the landscape. Large windows open the treehouse up to natural light and views of the outdoors. Guests can also reconnect with nature from the two balconies on either side of the building. The treehouse interior comprises an open-plan kitchen, dining area, and living room with a wood-burning stove ; a spacious loft bedroom; shower and bathroom; and a second bedroom in the rear that could easily be transformed into an office. A large terrace beneath the treehouse leads down to the lake and a hot tub. Related: Incredible teepee-shaped ORKA house is made from 24 interlacing beams “Inhabit Treehouse contrasts geometric forms against the organic forms of the forest but still blends into the surroundings with its timber materials,” Antony Gibbons told Inhabitat. “New trees were also planted close to the structure to help strengthen the idea that the building cuts through the forest and is semi-camouflaged into its surroundings. The sharp geometric angles of the Interior also created an interesting layout that pushed away from 90 degree corners as much as possible.” + Antony Gibbons Design Images via Antony Gibbons Design

Read the rest here:
Dreamy treehouse hidden by Woodstock offers magnificent Catskills views

Circular garden walkway cuts straight through Japanese timber home

January 31, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Circular garden walkway cuts straight through Japanese timber home

Serious gardeners love to have their green space as close to their home as possible, but one Japanese couple’s love for gardening has literally come “full circle”. Designed by Fujiwaramuro Architects , the House in Mukainada has a continuous concrete garden promenade that cuts straight through the couple’s tiny timber clad home . Located in Hiroshima, the home was designed to integrate the garden into the design, making it easier for the elderly couple to enjoy their greenery. The home’s compact volume stems from wanting to protect the existing Japanese dogwood trees found on the lot. As part of the design, the architects built an earthquake-resistant wall around the perimeter that pulls double duty as a privacy fence. Related: Beautiful Greenhouse from Bangkok is a miniature garden you can bring inside Once the cedar-clad structure was designed, the architects began to build a circular earthen floor that lined up with the home’s two entrances. This round pathway was then was covered in concrete, leaving space for various planting holes. The garden design is meant to grow with the homeowners, so that eventually, they will be able to stroll through a verdant walkway without having to get their feet dirty. On the interior, the walls and flooring are also covered in oak, with a wide path of paler wood leading from the outdoor walkway through the home and back out again. The compact 800-square-foot space has one bedroom, an office space and a kitchen and bathroom. For now the home serves as a place for the family to socialize, but it was designed to be adaptable for various future uses, such as a community center or gallery space. + Fujiwaramuro Architects Via Archdaily Photography by Toshiyuki Yano

View original post here:
Circular garden walkway cuts straight through Japanese timber home

Contemporary timber homes rise above Lithuania’s historic ammunition vaults

December 3, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Contemporary timber homes rise above Lithuania’s historic ammunition vaults

Read the rest of Contemporary timber homes rise above Lithuania’s historic ammunition vaults

See the rest here:
Contemporary timber homes rise above Lithuania’s historic ammunition vaults

Asymmetrical Karri Loop House is Built Around Indigenous Trees in Australia

February 18, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Asymmetrical Karri Loop House is Built Around Indigenous Trees in Australia

Read the rest of Asymmetrical Karri Loop House is Built Around Indigenous Trees in Australia Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Architecture , australia , environmental home design , home design , homes built around trees , homes in perth , indigenous trees and home design , italian architects , Kari Loop House , kari trees , Landscape Architecture , MORQ architects , raised home design , steel tripod footings , timber homes , treehouse design        

View original post here: 
Asymmetrical Karri Loop House is Built Around Indigenous Trees in Australia

Hon?tice Biotope: Crumbling Estate Buildings Reinvented as a Modern Eco Resort in the Czech Republic

February 18, 2014 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Hon?tice Biotope: Crumbling Estate Buildings Reinvented as a Modern Eco Resort in the Czech Republic

Read the rest of Hon?tice Biotope: Crumbling Estate Buildings Reinvented as a Modern Eco Resort in the Czech Republic Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: agricultural tourism , Architects P?ikryl Prokš , Biotope Hon?tice , Czech architects , Czech Republic resorts , eco resort , eco-tourism , green reconstruction , green renovation , Hon?tice resorts , locally sourced materials , recycled building material        

Here is the original post:
Hon?tice Biotope: Crumbling Estate Buildings Reinvented as a Modern Eco Resort in the Czech Republic

Bad Behavior has blocked 1369 access attempts in the last 7 days.