TREDJE NATUR proposes angled timber housing that meets UNs sustainability goals

June 13, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on TREDJE NATUR proposes angled timber housing that meets UNs sustainability goals

Copenhagen-based architectural firm TREDJE NATUR has unveiled an urban housing proposal that ticks all the right boxes for beautiful and sustainable design. Created to follow the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals — a blueprint of 17 goals ranging from affordable and clean energy to responsible consumption and production — TREDJE NATUR’s proposed mixed-use development is estimated to save 30 to 50 percent of carbon emissions compared to conventional housing construction. Named “New Angle” after the timber townhouses’ sharply pitched rooflines, the site-specific housing development emphasizes safe and low-carbon community living, biodiversity, flexibility and protection from the elements and traffic noise. Created as part of a feasibility study for the Copenhagen Metropolitan Area, New Angle comprises nearly 130,000 square feet of housing and a little over 160,000 square feet of office space. The development has been proposed for a commercial site sandwiched between two different motorways and a ring road. TREDJE NATUR’s design is a direct response to the site conditions, particularly the noise nuisances from surrounding traffic. The layout and shape of the houses create an inward-looking development that ensures optimized daylighting for all residents, ample green space and protection from traffic noise. Set on a parking plinth, the townhouses are arranged in an L-shaped ring with steeply sloped roofs angled toward the central common green space that can be used for urban gardening and recreation. The angle of the roof profiles not only shields residents from traffic noise, but also allows for integrated solar panels with maximum performance and rainwater collection systems. The renderings show the housing would be built primarily from timber with a strong emphasis on the outdoors and neighborly connection. Related: World’s first upcycled high-rise is proposed for Copenhagen “The CO2 savings happen through the building design, choice of materials, systematic solutions, focus on climate and biodiversity and overall by creating a framework for a strong community and a sustainable lifestyle,” explained the architects, who said the design is a more sustainable alternative to the conventional multistory building. “Apart from significant CO2 savings, calculations also show that the project is economically sustainable and can be constructed with low establishment costs compared to similar housing units.” + TREDJE NATUR Images via TREDJE NATUR

Go here to see the original:
TREDJE NATUR proposes angled timber housing that meets UNs sustainability goals

Minimalist villa in Japan boasts dark timber exterior and bright white interior

June 11, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Minimalist villa in Japan boasts dark timber exterior and bright white interior

Japanese firm, TAPO Architects have unveiled a beautiful timber house located in Sakura City in the Japanese prefecture of Chiba. Surrounded by peaceful forest, the Sakura Villa is a sophisticated minimalist design that features a simple mono-pitched roof with a charred timber exterior and bright white interior. Located on a small lot surrounded by forestscape, the villa was designed to blend in seamlessly with the landscape. To create a strong connection with the wooded surroundings, the 2,300 square-foot home is clad in a mix of charred timber siding and black standing seam metal sheeting. Related: Black timber Villa S makes more energy than it consumes The elongated volume of the structure is punctuated by a spacious glass and wood entranceway which is flanked by large windows on either side. The entrance to the home is through a central courtyard that leads to the living space through a set of sliding glass doors. Walking past the doors, the walkway leads to the outdoor patio space, creating an integral connection between the indoor and outdoor worlds. On the interior of the home, its jet black exterior facade is exchanged for an open-plan living area with all-white walls and exposed timber beams and columns. Almost entirely devoid of furnishings save for a long wooden dining table located opposite the kitchen, the space is minimalist, modern and fresh. Beyond the social areas found on the south side of the home, the private areas such as the bedrooms and bathrooms, are located on the north side. The sloped ceiling adds additional space on this side of the home, which was built out with two attic spaces accessible by ladders. This area is used for storage or playrooms for the family’s kids. + TAPO Via Design Boom Photography by Masayoshi Ishii via TAPO

Continued here:
Minimalist villa in Japan boasts dark timber exterior and bright white interior

Black charred-timber home embraces forest views in Zrich

April 2, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Black charred-timber home embraces forest views in Zrich

In the midst of a centuries-old forest sits the Two Family House, an aptly named project that houses a pair of maisonette apartments for two families at the edge of Zürich, Switzerland. Local architecture firm Hajnoczky.Zanchetta Architekten collaborated with architect Angela Waibel on the design, which takes advantage of its wooded location with full-height windows that capture views of the changing landscape. Due to regulations that enforce minimal disturbance to the landscape, the building’s unusual triangular shape is dictated by the forest, which diagonally divided the parcel. To fit two homes onto the constrained space without compromising space and comfort, the architects used the slope of property to vertically separate the two apartments. Each of the four levels has a slightly different floor plan and size; the upper floors, for instance, have cantilevered elements, such as projecting windows, that increase floor space. The larger of the two maisonette apartments occupies the ground floor, which comprises the bedrooms, and the first floor, where the communal spaces are located. Since the building is set into the existing slope, both the ground floor and first floor have direct access to the gardens. The second apartment occupies the uppermost two floors. To make up for the smaller footprint, the upper apartment has access to three rooftop terraces. The building is primarily a timber-clad concrete structure, aside for the topmost level, which is built of timber construction. Related: Massive tree-like sculpture takes over Switzerland’s largest train station “To enhance the distinctiveness of the building, we have chosen a black timber facade to elegantly contrast with the surrounding nature,” the architects explain in a statement. “The tree grove is part of a forest arm that permeates through the city. From dense foliage in summer, the location metamorphoses in winter into a snowy scenery with a beautiful creek that flows to the lake of Zürich .” + Hajnoczky.Zanchetta Architekten Images © Lucas Peters

Excerpt from:
Black charred-timber home embraces forest views in Zrich

A rare 1962 Airstream is a marvelous home with a whimsical, midcentury design

April 2, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on A rare 1962 Airstream is a marvelous home with a whimsical, midcentury design

When it comes to restoring old Airstreams, there’s a bevy of beautiful design options out there. But the expert team from Colorado-based Timeless Travel Trailers has just unveiled a marvelous Airstream conversion that is really one for the books. The company had its task cut out for itself when a client asked Timeless Travel Trailers to restore a rare, almost 60-year-old trailer. The result? A gorgeous interior design scheme that pays homage to the Airstream’s midcentury origins thanks to a shiny aluminum interior skin, bamboo flooring and plenty of wood paneling. Like most aging Airstreams, this trailer has a very interesting history. In 1962, the Western Pacific Railroad Company commissioned 10 40-foot Airstream trailers to be used as housing for workers laying rail track. The provided trailers were different from Airstream ‘s typical size and layout in that they were manufactured by riveting two 20-foot trailers together. When Union Pacific Railroad acquired Western Pacific in 1989, most of the 10 trailers were put out to pasture, either completely destroyed, put in museums or auctioned off, which is how one man became the proud owner of one of these unique trailers. Related: This 1970s Airstream is an off-grid oasis for a family of six When tasked with converting the Western Pacific Airstream into a modern living space to be used as a vacation home , the team from Timeless Travel Trailers used the trailer’s history as inspiration. Once the exterior was gleamed back to the oh-so-recognizable Airstream shine, the interior was outfitted with a remarkable design worthy of the trailer’s storied past. The first thing to catch the eye is the glimmering aluminum skin that covers the walls and ceiling, creating a vibrant atmosphere that is enhanced by an undeniable mid-century flair. An extra-wide galley provides ample space for the central living room, which features wide-plank bamboo flooring  and cabinets made out of a rich walnut veneer. A custom-made sofa wraps around the space, providing plenty of room for socializing, something not often possible in most Airstreams. Additionally, horizontal windows provide optimal natural light that reflects playfully off the aluminum walls. In contrast to the heavy wood features and furnishings, the kitchen and bathroom feature solid white counters and geometric black-and-white ceramic backsplash. Throughout the space, additional furnishings speak to the midcentury style, such as the lime green pendant lamps and bright red accent walls. + Timeless Travel Trailers Via Curbed Images via Timeless Travel Trailers

Originally posted here: 
A rare 1962 Airstream is a marvelous home with a whimsical, midcentury design

Gorgeous barn is built of reclaimed, century-old oaks from the site itself

June 4, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Gorgeous barn is built of reclaimed, century-old oaks from the site itself

In 2017, Dutch design firm HilberinkBosch Architects found out that seven of their century-old oak trees were in ailing health and would need to be cut down. Instead of sending the oaks to the paper mill, the architects decided to try their hand at building a timber barn using traditional construction techniques. The result—called the Sixteen-Oak Barn—was a stunning success that combines modern and rustic features with large panels of glazing and untreated timbers. The idea for a barn came from the local building vernacular in the Dutch region of Meierij van ‘s-Hertogenbosch, which features gabled farmhouses traditionally built from locally available materials . In a design the architects describe as “haphazard aesthetics,” the Sixteen-Oak Barn was constructed of the locally felled, century-old oak trees in addition to a couple of oaks sourced from the nearby Wamberg estate. The barn comprises a carport, storage room, and a workshop / meeting room for office use. There is also an addition loft space located above the storage room. A mobile sawmill brought on-site was used to cut the core sections of the felled oak tree trunks into structural timber for the frames, roof, and siding. The transverse-frame barn involves tie rod trusses and roof rafters to hold up an asymmetrical shingled roof clad in cleaved soft sapwood. Stanchions with bark serve as solar fins to shield the glazed facade from unwanted solar heat gain. Board-formed concrete complements the timber palette indoors. Leftover timber was chopped and stored as firewood in the barn’s recessed north facade. Related: Traditional barn raising techniques bring a modern cost-effective farm to life “The barn’s aesthetics have been strongly influenced by coincidence,” wrote the architects. “It lends this contemporary building a vital expression that merges old and new in a wonderful and extraordinary way. Untreated timber, concrete and glass have been intermingled in various ways. The irregular dimensions of the wood used to build the formwork resulted in far from perfect concrete surfaces.” + HilberinkBosch architects Images by René de Wit

Read the original post:
Gorgeous barn is built of reclaimed, century-old oaks from the site itself

Vertical village built almost entirely of wood to rise in Paris

April 27, 2018 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Vertical village built almost entirely of wood to rise in Paris

Sou Fujimoto , Nicolas Laisné and Dimitri Roussel have won a design competition to design a striking new mixed-use development as a counterpoint to Paris’ urban sprawl. Titled “Vertical Village,” the 164-foot-tall tower will serve as a “new gateway” to the east suburb Rosny-sous-Bois and be built almost entirely of timber. The nearly 400-foot-long timber-framed structure will be reinforced with a concrete base and supporting column. Developed by La Compagnie de Phalsbourg and REI Habitat, the 303,542-square-foot mixed-use Vertical Village will comprise 57,000 square feet of office space and 183,000 square feet of housing, nearly a third of which will be allocated for social housing . Unlike the conventional architecture surrounding the structure, Vertical Village is designed in Fujimoto’s iconic architectural style with its undulating white form and seemingly random assortment of geometric canopies supported by thin pillars. Glazing wraps around the building as will greenery. Related: Paris hopes to create a forest 5 times bigger than NYC’s Central Park The ground floor and rooftop will house 64,583 square feet of open community space including a food court, day care center, family office, community centers, an escape game center, and a rooftop bar. A sports hub will span the full height of one section of the building and feature climbing walls , urban soccer pitches, and a gym. The Vertical Village is part of a wider government-backed scheme to revitalize Paris’ suburbs as directed by Inventons la Métropole du Grand Paris . + Sou Fujimoto + Nicolas Laisné + Dimitri Roussel Via ArchDaily Images © Sou Fujimoto, Nicolas Laisné and Dimitri Roussel

Read the rest here: 
Vertical village built almost entirely of wood to rise in Paris

Mountain Tree House in Georgia encompasses a beautiful bamboo garden

December 28, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Mountain Tree House in Georgia encompasses a beautiful bamboo garden

Read the rest of Mountain Tree House in Georgia encompasses a beautiful bamboo garden

More here:
Mountain Tree House in Georgia encompasses a beautiful bamboo garden

Elliptical Music Pavilion in Austria is made from locally-sourced silver fir

November 20, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Elliptical Music Pavilion in Austria is made from locally-sourced silver fir

Read the rest of Elliptical Music Pavilion in Austria is made from locally-sourced silver fir

Read more:
Elliptical Music Pavilion in Austria is made from locally-sourced silver fir

Ethereal eco-resort blends Chinese tradition with modern elegance

November 9, 2015 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Ethereal eco-resort blends Chinese tradition with modern elegance

Read the rest of Ethereal eco-resort blends Chinese tradition with modern elegance

Go here to see the original:
Ethereal eco-resort blends Chinese tradition with modern elegance

LA’s new street lamps will keep cell service running after an earthquake

November 9, 2015 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on LA’s new street lamps will keep cell service running after an earthquake

Los Angeles just announced plans to roll out a new generation of high-tech street lamps that can keep citizens connected even when cell networks are down after a debilitating natural disaster. Philips ’ SmartPole streetlights are equipped with energy-efficient LED bulbs and 4G LTE wireless technology by Ericsson . City officials are eager to celebrate the adoption of 100 SmartPoles, which will keep both businesses and citizens connected in densely populated areas. Read the rest of LA’s new street lamps will keep cell service running after an earthquake

Originally posted here: 
LA’s new street lamps will keep cell service running after an earthquake

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1617 access attempts in the last 7 days.