Sleep among the treetops in a nomadic hotel design with minimal impact

October 12, 2017 by  
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Reconnection with nature doesn’t always mean roughing it on a campsite. Environmental consulting firm EoA Inc created Living the Till, a unique treetop hotel resort concept that rescues guests from the stresses of everyday life by elevating them into the tree canopy. Conceived as a nomadic resort, the Till can be easily assembled in a variety of environments and then disassembled and moved without impacting the environment. Described by the team as a camping on a “hovering, transparent magic carpet,” Living the Till comprises a series of conical tents suspended on ropes tied to nearby trees. A large net stretched taut and secured to trees is placed beneath the tents. Bridges between the trees provide access between campsites. “Living the Till allows for seasonal inhabitation in remote areas, such as the stunning and perfectly preserved forests of Ecuador, Malaysia, Borneo, the Amazon, California, Australia, or Japan,” wrote the designers. “The concept was inspired by the air plant Tillandsia, which lives in harmony with a host tree. Conceived as a temporary nomadic structure, the Till can be assembled and taken down in pristine, coveted areas by a small team of climbers with simple tools without impacting the environment during the process or duration of a guest’s stay.” Related: Gorgeous Robin’s Nest Treehouse Hotel immerses you in nature Living the Till was recently honored as this year’s Radical Innovation Award winner. The design team was awarded a $10,000 reward at the New Museum last week. Founder of Radical Innovation John Hardy commended the project as “the perfect antidote to city dwelling.” Play Design Hotel , located in Taipei, received the second place prize of $5,000. + Radical Innovation Award Images via EoA Inc

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Sleep among the treetops in a nomadic hotel design with minimal impact

This living hammock is a swinging seat made of soil-less plants

October 2, 2017 by  
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Ever imagine swinging from the trees in a hammock made of plants? Spanish artist Ainhoa Garmendia is making the fantasy into reality. Her Naturalise installation features a hammock made out of soil-less living plants woven into a sturdy fabric. The piece is a statement that calls to fight our contemporary throw-away culture in favor of something lasting and living. “We are very used to short-life objects. We were taught that recycling is good, when the real solution is just not to produce waste. We take advantage of plants’ benefits, while they have many structural and functional characteristics to be applied when they are still alive” said Ainhoa Garmendia in an interview with Inhabitat. “Naturalise is a verb, an action and a process of creating objects that keep growing and are alive” explained the artist added. To realize Naturalise Ainhoa Garmendia chose Tillandsia Usneoides (known also as a Spanish Moss), a plant that needs no soil to grow and requires little water. Its long, soft fibers are a perfect medium for the hand weaving realized by the artist herself. The Naturalise hammock can be seen as a metaphor. The suspended in-air object made of plants, a typical earthly material, embodies an idea of reconnection with nature, bringing the idea of sustainability and eco-awareness to a new level. Related: Asif Khan creates spectacular furniture with flowers The Naturalise living hammock was first showcased in Milan at “I see colors everywhere” exhibition at La Triennale di Milano curated by the clothing brand United Colors of Benetton and Fabrica communication research center fore Milan Fashion Week 2017. + Ainhoa Garmendia Images via Maria Novozhilova for Inhabitat

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This living hammock is a swinging seat made of soil-less plants

Lloyd Godman’s experimental air plant sculpture teaches students about tensegrity

April 6, 2015 by  
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Artist Lloyd Godman developed SPICEE, an experimental air plant sculpture suspended on the rooftop of the Friends School Hobart in Australia. Created as part of the school’s Quaker in Residence program, the permanent installation teaches students the Buckminster Fuller concept of Tensegrity , a structural principle that uses pre-stressed tensioned elements to create a system of continuous tension. The art piece is made from stainless steel and uses six tubes to symbolize the Quaker testimonials behind the acronym SPICEE: Simplicity, Peace, Integrity, Community, Equality, and Earth Care. Living Tillandsia air plants are attached to SPICEE with special wire, and excess plant growth will be harvested to create more living plant artworks. + Lloyd Godman The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: air plants , Buckminster Fuller , Friends School Hobart , Lloyd Godman , Quaker in Residence , reader submitted content , SPICEE , tensegrity , tillandsia

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Lloyd Godman’s experimental air plant sculpture teaches students about tensegrity

In California, new seismic evidence now points to strongest earthquake potential yet

April 6, 2015 by  
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As if California needed more bad news – amidst a drought of unprecedented proportions , new research has revealed the state could be in for a massively destructive earthquake. We reported last month that seismologists expect a megaquake in California’s future , and now a further discovery makes that news even more terrifying. According to Phys.org , seismologists from UC Berkeley have now proven that the Hayward Fault, east of San Francisco, is actually a branch of the Calaveras Fault that runs east of San Jose – which means both could eventually rupture together and create a much larger earthquake than previously expected. Read the rest of In California, new seismic evidence now points to strongest earthquake potential yet Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: California earthquake , earthquake , earthquakes , estelle chassard uc berkeley , harward fault connected to Calaveras , san francisco earthquake , san jose earthquake , scientists predict stronger earthquake , seismic hazard california

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In California, new seismic evidence now points to strongest earthquake potential yet

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