Lessons from smart cities in urban transport and mobility

November 5, 2018 by  
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A conversation with two entrepreneurs who have helped shape the future of transportation. Hear their thoughts on what needs to happen for cities to deliver on sustainable transportation that is shared, electric and autonomous.  

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Lessons from smart cities in urban transport and mobility

From ‘care of creation’ to boardroom value creation

August 7, 2018 by  
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What we talk about when we talk about “love” to a corporate boardroom. Plus, four thoughts to inspire corporate action on climate.

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From ‘care of creation’ to boardroom value creation

How this skincare company is improving its products to save coral reefs

August 7, 2018 by  
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All Good’s solution-oriented, activism-based business strategy means pushing for both environmental and employee well-being.

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How this skincare company is improving its products to save coral reefs

INTERVIEW: 8 Questions with Architect Tom Kundig

May 7, 2018 by  
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Seattle-based Olson Kundig Architects is one of our favorite architectural firms, championing the fight for sustainable design. Founded in the late 1960s, the firm has created a collection of structures that rise from the ground as natural extensions of their sites, acting as bridges between nature, culture, and people. We sat down with principal architect Tom Kundig who shares his thoughts on his design process, what it’s like to be a Seattle-based firm, where he finds his inspiration and more. Read on for our exclusive interview with Tom, as well as a look at some featured projects that are as green as they are gorgeous! Inhabitat: Many well-known architects make it a point to establish offices in large cities, but even with your success Olson + Kundig  operations remains in the (arguably) more remote Pacific Northwest. What impact do you think being a Seattle-based firm has had on your work? Tom Kundig: Not entirely sure. I’m sure there are impacts that we are not aware of – are we ‘mysterious’ because we are remote, or are we ‘removed from the action’? My guess is that it might be both, but the most important consideration is how we do our work.  In a large landscape like the Pacific Northwest – and in a relatively large city like Seattle that is connected internationally – we might have the best of both worlds. Irregardless, our work is context based – cultural, environmental, craft, tectonics, and so forth – and we are in an ideal location where all these elements converge. Inhabitat: Are you concerned about environmental and social sustainability in your buildings? If so, what role does green building play into your work? Tom Kundig: I am absolutely concerned about it. And I’m not speaking strictly of the environmental, because the process of building and what’s required to maintain a building consumes not only a significant amount of natural resources but also has a huge influence on cultural and social sustainability. Ultimately architecture is cultural and social – it is shelter at its most basic human level, and within the spirit of that notion, it is a deeply humanistic endeavor. Inhabitat: What do you feel is the greatest challenge when it comes to designing for environmental sustainability? Tom Kundig: The greatest challenge is designing to an authenticity that recognizes the true issues of sustainability, not just treating it as a checklist of items or simplifying it to accommodate to scorekeeping. Sustainability takes on a true, holistic understanding of all the implications of a design. Inhabitat: You were the sole N. American representative in Toto Gallery MA’s “Global Ends – Towards the Beginning” an exhibit that hopes to inspire architects to break away from the architectural uniformity resulting from past movements. Modernism has clearly been the most dominant and continues to permeate design – what are your thoughts on its value today? Tom Kundig: Modernism at its core is a humanistic value. It is about shelter , about culture, and about equality, safety, and nurturing for a better future for EVERYBODY. Unfortunately today, many of these values have been lost in stylistic fashion.  I am hopeful that the next movement will be about a meaningful search for a humanistic architecture . This is an idea that will never go out of style. Inhabitat: Why do you think sustainability remains largely outside of theoretical discussions of architecture?  Sustainability can be clever, innovative, it can justify designs, but by in large it is not a realm of theoretical review.  Themes such as space, aesthetics, and cities are constant avenues for debate, speculation, and experiment, but sustainability still seems thin. Thoughts? Tom Kundig: Sustainability has been relegated to the ‘science’ side of the practice, both by the practitioners and in academia. Architecture at its core is the  intersection of the rational and the poetic. If architecture , academics and practitioners can embrace that idea and respect the two realms of the practice, this question would not have to be asked. Unfortunately, the question is a good one.   Inhabitat: Can you tell us about the house you grew up in? Tom Kundig : It was a 1918 classic two-story bungalow with a porch facing the street. However, it was its location near a large city port that had more effect on my childhood than the house itself. Spending my formative years in and around the lake cabins of the areas probably had the most impact on my career. Inhabitat: Who inspires you? Tom Kundig: So many architects , both living and dead, inspire me. It’s difficult to list. But certainly, individuals within the architectural, art and music realm are the most inspirational. And when I speak of artists, what I’m focusing in on are those willing to truly put their souls on the line for their art.  They are working ‘out there’, many times without a net, vulnerable to the second-guessing of polite society, bureaucrats, academics, and mainstream media – it’s a lonely place to be. Inhabitat: What is your ultimate goal when it comes to your work? What do you want to be remembered for? Tom Kundig: I hope that my work is meaningful and it that it resonates in people’s lives – architecture at its core. + Olson Kundig Architects

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INTERVIEW: 8 Questions with Architect Tom Kundig

Make Your Own Natural Bee Repellent

June 20, 2017 by  
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Note: This post contains affiliate links, which helps fund our Recycling Directory, the most comprehensive in North America. Now that the season of picnics and barbecues is officially here, your thoughts may also go to typical summer pests. The…

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Make Your Own Natural Bee Repellent

Postcards from the Future: Lessons from Hawaii for the World

July 7, 2016 by  
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Two visionary entrepreneurs who have been thinking deeply about Hawaii’s energy future share their thoughts about the path forward at VERGE Hawaii 2016.

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Postcards from the Future: Lessons from Hawaii for the World

Look for thoughtful notes hidden throughout London

December 8, 2015 by  
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How do you get people to slow down in a bustling city like London? This kind and charming urban intervention may do the trick. Online magazine and creative studio Thoughtful has planted small origami envelopes all over the city, each with a penny and a note inside, to encourage random acts of thoughtfulness across London. The initiative asks people to pay it forward by adding their own notes and donations in the envelope in hopes of donating the packages to good causes. Anyone can get involved with the initiative too. Thoughtful is open-sourcing their design , which can be found on their website. + Thoughtful The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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Look for thoughtful notes hidden throughout London

Zaha Hadid Deflects Responsibility for Over 500 Qatar World Cup Worker Deaths

February 27, 2014 by  
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Zaha Hadid’s Al Wakrah stadium for the Qatar 2022 World Cup has raised eyebrows since it was first revealed, but a shockingly high number of construction deaths are threatening to cast a sinister shadow over the yonic structure. According to The Guardian, more than 500 Indian migrant workers have reportedly died in construction preparations for the World Cup. When The Guardian asked for her thoughts, Hadid replied that it is “not my duty as an architect to look at it.” Read the rest of Zaha Hadid Deflects Responsibility for Over 500 Qatar World Cup Worker Deaths Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: al wakrah stadium , architect liability , construction deaths , indian migrant workers , migrant worker deaths , migrant workers , qatar 2022 world cup stadium , qatar labor laws , Qatar World Cup , world cup construction , world cup stadium , yonic architecture , zaha hadid        

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Zaha Hadid Deflects Responsibility for Over 500 Qatar World Cup Worker Deaths

Futuristic Headset Translates Your Dog’s Thoughts Into Human Language

December 18, 2013 by  
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For centuries, man has tried to communicate with his canine companions through commands, gestures, and best guesses. Now a team of designers from the Nordic Society for Invention and Discovery have developed No More Woof , a doggie headset that can read animal brainwaves and translate them into human speech! Read the rest of Futuristic Headset Translates Your Dog’s Thoughts Into Human Language Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: animal headset , animal mind , brain waves , Crowdfunding , eeg , english translation , indiegogo campaign , no more woof , nordic society for invention and discovery , nsid , pet accessory        

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Futuristic Headset Translates Your Dog’s Thoughts Into Human Language

The Biomimicry Manual: What can Vultures Teach Us About Sterilization and Specialization?

October 24, 2013 by  
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Did you know a coven of vultures swirling overhead is called a ‘kettle?’ I love that. It makes me think of a fortune teller’s black magic tea-leaves, steeping in her stove-top cauldron. And of course, we all know what this fortune says. Vultures are the harbinger of death, eagerly awaiting the last painful breath of unlucky desert travelers. They are known as opportunists and cowards, picking at the soft entrails of others’ misfortune, gleeful at their bleach-bone fate. If you’re like me, your thoughts turn instantly to ambulance-chasers and divorce lawyers. The ancient Mayans didn’t see them that way, though. To them, the vulture was a god: human in body, with a naked kingly head. He brought their earthly messages skyward to the other gods, a divine liaison between heaven and earth. Today, this exquisitely-adapted carrion specialist has many things to tell us, if we choose to listen. Tune your ears to today’s entry of The Biomimicry Manual , and maybe you will agree. Read the rest of The Biomimicry Manual: What can Vultures Teach Us About Sterilization and Specialization? Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: biomimicry , california condor , ecological niche , feeding guild , scavenger adaptations , teratorn , turkey vulture        

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The Biomimicry Manual: What can Vultures Teach Us About Sterilization and Specialization?

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