New graphene sieve can remove even small salts from seawater

April 4, 2017 by  
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Graphene is the world’s strongest material, but that’s not all it can do. The wonder material can also be used as a filter that removes salts from seawater so it’s safe to drink. While scientists have eyed graphene-oxide membranes for better filtration – and even showed graphene could filter out large salts – now 13 University of Manchester scientists developed graphene membranes that can sieve common, smaller salts out of water. It takes small sieves to remove common salts from substances like seawater, and in the past when placed in water graphene-oxide membranes swelled, and weren’t able to catch those smaller salts. The University of Manchester scientists found a way to control the pore size of the graphene to sieve those common small salts out of water. Professor Rahul Nair, one of the scientists part of the research, said the realization of “membranes with uniform pore size down to atomic scale” is a significant step. Related: Affordable new biofoam could revolutionize how developing countries clean water The discovery could open doors to efficient, less expensive desalination technology – which the university points out is crucial as climate change depletes water supply in modern cities. In just around eight years, 14 percent of the world’s population could face water scarcity, according to United Nations estimates, and not all countries can afford large, expensive desalination plants to provide relief to their citizens. The university says the graphene technology pursued by the scientists could revolutionize water filtration around the world, offering an affordable option for developing countries . The researchers think their discovery could be scaled up for wider use. Nair said in a statement, “This is the first clear-cut experiment in this regime. We also demonstrate that there are realistic possibilities to scale up the described approach and mass produce graphene-based membranes with required sieve sizes.” The journal Nature Nanotechnology published the research online yesterday. Via The University of Manchester Images via The University of Manchester and Pixabay

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New graphene sieve can remove even small salts from seawater

Scientists develop new way to generate electricity via seawater

May 23, 2016 by  
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As we search for an energy source that doesn’t give off dangerous emissions, scientists from Japan’s Osaka University came a step closer towards obtaining a solar fuel from one of the most abundant resources on Earth: seawater. Through chemical reactions, they were able to collect hydrogen peroxide, H2O2, from seawater, which can be used to generate power in fuel cells. In their recently published paper, the scientists said solar energy is an important alternative to fossil fuels,…

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Scientists develop new way to generate electricity via seawater

Genetic Breakthrough Could Save Honeybees From Colony-Destroying Mites

December 23, 2010 by  
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Image via Wikipedia The varroa mite has been the bane of honeybee colonies, and has even been blamed to a certain extent for colony collapse disorder.

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Genetic Breakthrough Could Save Honeybees From Colony-Destroying Mites

Climate Science, Circa 1956 (Video)

November 8, 2010 by  
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Image: Screenshot, Climate Denial Crock of the Week One of the prevailing myths about climate change is that it’s a “new” science — merely the latest fad in an ongoing cycle of scientific doom-saying. You’ve almost certainly heard or read someone say something like this: “In the 70s, the scientists were all telling us the globe was cooling — now it’s warming. Well which one is it, durn it?” The implication is that climate science is some kind of a trend, and is apt to change course when those fickle scientists find something els…

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Climate Science, Circa 1956 (Video)

GreenFest 2010: Bill McKibben Interviews Bryony Schwan

November 8, 2010 by  
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Bill McKibben speaks with Bryony Schwan at Green Festivals 2010 in San Francisco in this TreeHugger exclusive. Bryony Schwan is the executive director and co-founder of The Biomimicry Institute, a non-profit organization that promotes the new science of biomimicry

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GreenFest 2010: Bill McKibben Interviews Bryony Schwan

Nashville Musician Shingles His Roof With Records

November 8, 2010 by  
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Nashville Musician Matt Glassmeyer is, according to Jazz.com , a bit of an inventor.

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Nashville Musician Shingles His Roof With Records

GreenFest 2010: Bill McKibben Interviews Starhawk

November 8, 2010 by  
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Bill McKibben speaks with Starhawk at Green Festivals 2010 in San Francisco in this TreeHugger exclusive.

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GreenFest 2010: Bill McKibben Interviews Starhawk

World Nations’ Current ‘Paltry’ Emissions Cuts Will Lead to 3C Rise

April 21, 2010 by  
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Photo via aRecentStudy Those of us that tried to be optimistic about Copenhagen often pointed to the fact that a non-binding treaty was better than no treaty at all, and that the voluntary pledges made by nations to curb their emissions was indeed going to be have an impact.

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World Nations’ Current ‘Paltry’ Emissions Cuts Will Lead to 3C Rise

Offshore Wind Turbines Help Sustain Marine Life

January 19, 2010 by  
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A study of offshore wind farms off Europe’s coasts has revealed that the structures pose no threat to marine life, and in fact, they help sustain it. Scientists at Stockholm University’s Zoology Department conducted the study and found that the turbine foundations acted as habitats for fish, crabs, mussels, lobsters and plants, creating a more diverse and dense population of marine life at wind farm sites than at control sites away from the farms

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Offshore Wind Turbines Help Sustain Marine Life

University of Rhode Island Scientists Coordinating First Ever Ocean Census

December 30, 2009 by  
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Photo via suneko They say there’s plenty of fish in the sea. But how many is “plenty”? The fact is, we don’t know how many fish are in the ocean, or how much marine life is living in the waters.

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University of Rhode Island Scientists Coordinating First Ever Ocean Census

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