Energy-neutral House of Eemnes is a sustainable culture house

October 21, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Energy-neutral House of Eemnes is a sustainable culture house

Thirty minutes east of Amsterdam , the municipality of Eemnes has recently welcomed a beautiful community center for everyone in the town to gather, play and learn. Created by Dutch firm MoederscheimMoonen Architects in collaboration with construction company Vaessen B.V., the mixed-use project — named the House of Eemnes — combines a library, theater, sports facilities and a restaurant all under one roof. Impressively, the project has also been engineered to be future-ready and sustainable with solar panels that generate more energy than the building consumes as well as a responsible stormwater management plan that captures rainwater runoff. Conceived as a meeting point in the heart of the town, the House of Eemnes was crafted with an inviting character that is achieved with a partly perforated facade inspired by the pattern in the city’s coat of arms as well as a light-filled interior dressed in warm materials. The library and restaurant are located at the center of the building and branch out to the various multifunctional areas, from the theater to the massive sports hall that can accommodate multiple recreational activities at the same time. Related: Amsterdam’s new circular archives building sustainably generates all of its own energy Large expanses of glazing, a natural materials palette and a vibrant mix of colors and patterns used throughout the interior executed by Aatvos and MARS interior architects help create a cohesive and inviting feel despite the diverse programming. Much of the interior follows an open layout for direct sight lines and easy social distancing; however, cozy nooks and intimate spaces have also been incorporated for more passive activities. A tall bookcase runs through the building to not only unite the floors but to also represent the identity of the House of Eemnes. As an energy-neutral building, the House of Eemnes features a roof entirely covered with solar panels that can even generate more energy than the building requires. The highly pervious landscape is optimized for water absorption while the skate park at the entrance can double as a water square for retaining overflow during heavy storms. + MoederscheimMoonen Architects Photography by Luuk Kramer via MoederscheimMoonen Architects

Original post:
Energy-neutral House of Eemnes is a sustainable culture house

DIY Halloween costumes for this year’s virtual parties

October 21, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on DIY Halloween costumes for this year’s virtual parties

Halloween 2020 will likely look a bit different than past years, considering we’re in the middle of a pandemic. But even if your shindig is a virtual Halloween party, the costumes are still at the heart of the fun. When planning the perfect outfit for your socially distanced event, remember to consider the impact on the planet. It’s easy to bring the ‘wow’ factor that will keep party-goers talking for weeks to come while still avoiding plastic and using materials that are natural and recyclable or compostable. Happy Halloween! Use what you have The easiest way to create DIY Halloween costumes with little to no additional environmental impact is to use what you already have. Dig through the closet and the holiday totes in the garage. You might be surprised what you find that could make for a fun, unique costume. Related: Have an eco-friendly Halloween and aim for zero-waste this October Scarecrow A plaid shirt alongside a straw hat will help you pull off a scarecrow costume sure to keep the birds at bay. Add some non-toxic face paint to complete the look. Farmer Some overalls and a bandana with that same flannel shirt and straw hat will spin your look into a farmer instead. Put the scarecrow and the farmer together for a cute couples’ costume idea. Skeleton Much of the skeleton look relies on the face paint. But for clothing, adorn all-black shirts and pants with white paint or fabric to create the appearance of bones. Cat A black cat, leopard or cheetah are always popular for Halloween. Dress in all black or pull out the printed onesie for starters. Then add some easy ears, a tail and face paint for the finishing touches. If you don’t have fabric around, look to old linens or clothing you can cut. Attach triangular ears to a headband. For the tail, sew two long strips of fabric together and stuff with additional material, cotton, packing paper or another natural material . Elephant Similarly, you can don gray clothing head to toe, and add an empty gift wrap tube or paper towel roll for your trunk. Create some floppy ears from fabric-covered or painted cardboard. Robber A robber costume is quick and easy. Throw on a black-and-white striped top, some black pants and a black beanie. Pair with a pillowcase to hold your spoils. Ladybug Children and adults alike can pull this look off with a bit of black paint, fabric or stickers and a pair of red pajamas you may already have around the house. Leggings and a long-sleeve shirt will do the job, too. Simple apply black circles randomly around the red fabric. Put together a simple matching mask or rely on face paint for the final touch. Turn to the recycling bin Save those boxes for your 2020 Halloween costumes and choose from this variety of quick, DIY costume options. Robot For the upper body of a robot costume, cut holes in a box for your head, lower body and arms. You can make it slide on over your head or attach in two pieces so it wraps around your body before securing with tape or ties. For your helmet, create another square box with a face cutout. No plastic required! Dress in gray with a long sleeve shirt and pants. Complete the look by painting the cardboard gray and attaching or painting knobs and a display on the front. Tip: recycled plastic or metal bottle caps make great knobs. Dice Roll the dice for a win with a simple cardboard box painted to look like a die. Remember, an accurate die adds up to seven on all opposite sides, so five dots are across from two dots, four across from three, and one across from six. Rubix Cube For a more colorful look, use the same cardboard box idea as the die, but paint it to resemble a Rubix Cube instead with various colorful squares. Knight Be a knight in shining armor for the planet with a cardboard shield, helmet and body armor. Embellish with paint if you like. Remember the cardboard or wood sword for your defense in battle! Mummy It’s a classic costume for a reason — it’s so easy. Head out to the paint supply cupboard or linen closet for an old white sheet , rip or cut it into shreds and wrap yourself head to toe. You’ll be ready for your next virtual Halloween bash in no time! Images via Adobe Stock

Here is the original:
DIY Halloween costumes for this year’s virtual parties

Hollandse Nieuwe crafts a vibrant, eco-friendly workspace with VR

September 10, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Hollandse Nieuwe crafts a vibrant, eco-friendly workspace with VR

Amsterdam-based architectural practice Hollandse Nieuwe has enlisted the help of virtual reality to create a dynamic and colorful workspace for civil servants. Commissioned by the local government as part of the city’s current policy to provide homes and semi-public workplaces for civil servants, the architects designed a flexible office space conducive to collaboration, health and creativity. The 1,650-square-meter office development was completed in 2019. To meet the government’s brief for a semi-public workspace open to all civil servants, the architects took cues from a grand cafe for the design of the ground floor. To promote social activity, the building features a plaza-like area that hosts diverse meeting places as well as a catering facility and kitchen that provides high-quality coffee. Related: Old coffee roastery to be reborn as a net-zero carbon office in London In the extended part of the plaza is the ‘superflexzone,’ an area comprising workspaces as well as flex-spaces that can be used as overflow for rentable units and civil servants interested in “hot desking,” or staying in the building for just a short period of time. The office also has a conference center for formal meetings. Although the office space follows an open-floor plan , the architects have clearly delineated the busier zones from the quieter areas while bright color schemes aid in way-finding. Proper insulation provides pleasant acoustics and indoor comfort as well. VR technology was also used to communicate the vision to the client for optimal results. The project follows the architecture firm’s goals of sustainability and recycling. Elements from the original interior, for instance, have been repurposed for the design of the new interior. The materials and finishes are all environmentally friendly. Well Standard principles have also been followed, and the existing pillars were covered with a new layer of foil to make them look fresh. Plant motifs are woven throughout the design to create a connection with nature. + Hollandse Nieuwe Images via Hollandse Nieuwe

View original post here: 
Hollandse Nieuwe crafts a vibrant, eco-friendly workspace with VR

Prefab apartment proposal wants to make city living more sustainable

July 6, 2020 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Prefab apartment proposal wants to make city living more sustainable

Rotterdam-based architecture firm AEMSEN has recently unveiled BARBIZON, a design proposal for sustainable apartments built from prefabricated, cross-laminated timber modules. Created with the vision that cities need healthy buildings, BARBIZON’s timber construction would be integrated with shared green spaces to encourage neighborly relations and to offset the urban heat island effect. The concept was originally developed for Barbizonlaan in Capelle aan den IJssel; however, the flexible design could be applied in other parts of the world as well. Energy efficiency, reduced building waste and sequestered carbon are among the many advantages of prefabricated, cross-laminated timber construction. AEMSEN’s BARBIZON proposal would comprise stackable and interchangeable CLT modules that combine to create 112 gas-free and bio-based apartments. The design includes 16 different housing types that vary in size from 45 square meters to 120 square meters to accommodate a variety of residents. Related: Wedge-shaped Sideyard champions CLT construction “By modular design and building with prefabricated CLT modules, the balance between city and nature can be brought back,” Jasper Jägers of AEMSEN said in a press release, noting the fireproof and lightweight qualities of CLT. “Energy-neutral, modular and circular construction with wood really is the future. It is lighter than traditional construction, it has good insulating properties and it provides much less nitrogen emissions. It makes sustainability and circularity accessible to everyone.” To promote sustainable living practices, BARBIZON developments would be integrated with green roofs and urban farming initiatives along the roofs and terraces. The shared green spaces — known as a “green valley” — would be accessible to all residents to help build a sense of community while providing habitat for local flora and fauna to boost biodiversity, thus bringing back a “balance between city and nature.” Photovoltaic systems could also be installed on top of the building to generate renewable energy. + AEMSEN Images via AEMSEN

Continued here:
Prefab apartment proposal wants to make city living more sustainable

Architects propose produce markets designed for social distancing

April 9, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Architects propose produce markets designed for social distancing

In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, making a trip to the grocery store has become a stressful experience for many people around the world. To help minimize risk, Rotterdam-based design studio Shift architecture urbanism has developed self-initiated designs for hyper-local micro markets to make shopping for food faster, safer and more accessible. Designed with a 16-square grid and three market stalls, the open-air proposal emphasizes flexibility and mobility as well as social distancing. The traditional open-air fresh produce markets have long been an important part of the Netherlands. However, their existence and the livelihoods of some fresh produce vendors have been threatened during the coronavirus outbreak; while some of the large weekly or semi-weekly street markets have stayed open in some parts of the country, the city of Rotterdam has closed all such markets. Related: Pop-up prefab hospitals proposed as healthcare centers during pandemics While Shift architecture urbanism acknowledges that supermarkets have not been closed and that some people have access to online shopping, it believes that the shutdown of street markets harms vulnerable, lower income groups by forcing them to congregate and shop at more expensive supermarkets. The architects’ hyper-local micro market proposal would preserve access to open-air markets for basic food needs while maintaining social distancing with a one-person-per-cell policy in the market’s 16-square grid setup. Constructed from flexible and mobile units, each market would have one entrance and two exits. To further limit time customers spend in the grid, the three market stalls — each selling a different kind of food, such as fruits, vegetables, dairy products or meat — would offer a pre-packaged bundle of goods instead of separate products. “Shift’s proposal is to keep the vital function of the fresh produce markets fully intact, even strengthening it, while at the same time minimizing its potential role in spreading the virus,” the architects explained. “Its former model of concentration has to be replaced by a model of dispersion, both in space and time. This is done by breaking down the large markets into so-called micro markets that are spread over the city and opening them up for a longer time. Instead of you going to the market, the market is coming to your neighborhood. These hyper-local markets are open at least 5 days a week instead of twice a week to further reduce the concentration of people.” + Shift architecture urbanism Images via Shift architecture urbanism

Original post: 
Architects propose produce markets designed for social distancing

Fully circular office can be sustainably demounted and rebuilt in weeks

April 2, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Fully circular office can be sustainably demounted and rebuilt in weeks

In its latest example of circular construction, Dutch architecture firm cepezed has completed Building D(emountable), a modern structure that can be fully demounted and is currently located in the heart of Delft. Designed as a building kit of prefabricated parts, the office raises the bar for sustainable architecture in the Netherlands, which aims to make all construction activities fully circular by 2050. Building D(emountable) was created as part of an office complex mostly housed in historic buildings on a centrally located site that cepezed purchased from Delft University of Technology in 2012. Over the years, the architecture firm repurposed the existing historic buildings into offices; however, it opted to demolish the site’s single non-historic structure due to its poor condition and to make way for new construction. Completed in late 2019, Building D(emountable) provides a modern counterpart to its historic neighbors. The building houses office space; the current tenants are app and website developer 9to5 Software and game developer Triumph Studios. Related: Amsterdam’s new circular archives building sustainably generates all of its own energy “Building D(emountable) has exactly the same footprint as the existing building that was no longer good and was demolished,” cepezed said of the four-story building, which encompasses nearly 1,000 square meters. “In addition to being demountable and remountable, the structure is also super lightweight: the use of materials is kept to an absolute minimum. The building is also completely flexible in its arrangement, has no gas connection and is equipped with heat recovery .” Apart from the concrete ground floor, all of the building components are modular and dry-mounted to allow for speedy construction, which takes a little over six months. The building structure — from the steel skeleton to the lightweight Laminated Veneer Lumber (LVL) floors — was assembled onsite in just three weeks. Double-glazed panels were mounted directly onto the steel structure to create walls of glazing that give the building the appearance of a large, glass cube. + cepezed Photography by Lucas van der Wee via cepezed

Continued here: 
Fully circular office can be sustainably demounted and rebuilt in weeks

BREEAM-certified renovation for 70s modernist icon in Amsterdam

January 28, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on BREEAM-certified renovation for 70s modernist icon in Amsterdam

MVSA Architects has dramatically breathed new life into Amsterdam’s iconic Rivierstaete — a monolithic 1973 modernist office building on the Amstel — with a sustainable and architecturally sensitive makeover that connects the building to the riverfront and surrounding community in a way unlike ever before. Completed last year, the renovation has earned a BREEAM Very Good distinction for its future-proof design that emphasizes flexibility as well as energy-saving technologies. The addition of green roofs and terraces help absorb stormwater runoff to make the building “Amsterdam Rainproof.” Located in the south of Amsterdam , the eight-story Rivierstaete was originally designed by architect Hugh Maaskant as Europe’s largest office building in the early 1970s. In recent years, the massive modernist building has struggled to attract tenants and, in 2013, international real estate company Vastint purchased the structure in a public sale and tapped MVSA Architects to lead the redesign. Instead of taking the easier option of demolishing and constructing a new building on site, the team decided to embrace the original design with a renovation. Critical to the redesign was opening up the building to the surroundings, which necessitated replacing the original pinched band of windows on the white-tiled facade with floor-to-ceiling glass . The new glazed facade, along with planted roof terraces added at different levels, gives the building a more open and inviting feel. The roof terraces, roof gardens, and green roofs also help provide water buffering and retention. Related: Amsterdam’s new circular archives building sustainably generates all of its own energy The glazed facade helps bring a greater amount of natural light indoors, which have now been rendered completely asbestos free to contribute to a cleaner and healthier working environment. Daylight control and motion sensors as well as solar shades provide optimized and energy-efficient climate control. The interior layout has also been reconfigured for flexibility to ensure a future-proof design.  + MVSA Architects Images via MVSA, Barwerd van der Plas, and Philip Lyaruu

View post:
BREEAM-certified renovation for 70s modernist icon in Amsterdam

Self-sufficient floating office building for GCA will take anchor in Rotterdam

January 28, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Self-sufficient floating office building for GCA will take anchor in Rotterdam

Copenhagen- and Rotterdam-based studio Powerhouse Company has unveiled designs for a unique floating office building to be anchored in the historic Rotterdam port of Rijnhaven. Created as the new headquarters for the Global Center on Adaptation (GCA), the contemporary structure will use a wide range of sustainability measures, such as heat exchangers and a green roof , to target energy-neutral, self-sufficient operations. The building, named Floating Office Rotterdam, will also be built entirely from timber. Led by former UN-Chairman Ban Ki-moon alongside Microsoft founder Bill Gates and IMF Managing Director Kristalina Georgieva, the GCA focuses on the mitigation of climate change through technology, planning and investment. Floating Office Rotterdam encapsulates the organization’s values with its sustainable design and will serve as a showcase of pioneering climate-resilient features. The unique building is expected to be opened by the Secretary General Ban Ki-moon and Mayor of Rotterdam Ahmed Aboutaleb during the international Summit on Adaptation in fall 2020. Related: Carbon-neutral, prefab development targets sustainable urbanism for Rotterdam’s Rijnhaven area Floating Office Rotterdam will break ground in spring 2020 at the Van Leeuwen grounds at the Masshaven before it is shipped to the Rijnhaven. Timber will be used as the main construction material to reduce the building’s carbon footprint, while passive solar principles have informed the design to reduce the energy demands. In addition to office space, Floating Office Rotterdam will also include a restaurant with a large outdoor terrace and a floating swimming pool in the Maas River. “Designing a sustainable, floating office building was a very challenging commission, and we approached it in an integrated way,” said Nanne de Ru, architect and founder of Powerhouse Company. “By using the water of the Rijnhaven to cool the building, and by using the roof of the office as a large energy source, the building is truly autarkic. The building structure is designed in wood; it can easily be demounted and reused. The building is ready for the circular economy .” + Powerhouse Company Photography by Plomp and Atchain via Powerhouse Company

See original here:
Self-sufficient floating office building for GCA will take anchor in Rotterdam

MVRDV’s garden oasis in Utrecht includes a green-roofed convention center

December 9, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on MVRDV’s garden oasis in Utrecht includes a green-roofed convention center

MVRDV has unveiled designs to transform the underutilized area on the west side of Utrecht’s central station into “a garden in the city” with a new, green-roofed Jaarbeurs convention center. The redeveloped events venue will be at the the heart of a 600,000-square-meter masterplan. Created to achieve BREEAM Excellent certification, the project has been fittingly named a “city oasis” by Jaarbeurs CEO Albert Arp for its inclusion of accessible green space, the beautification of the streetscape and the focus on sustainable design. Developed in collaboration with SITE Urban Development, the masterplan for the Jaarbeursdistrict will redefine the area as one presently dominated by cars into a more pedestrian-friendly destination. The new design will introduce a car-free street — the “Jaarbeurs Boulevard” — that will serve as the neighborhood’s new backbone and provide access to the new Jaarbeurs convention center as well as create a direct link from the station to the shops and restaurants along the Merwede Canal and areas beyond. Related: This Eco Villa in Utrecht produces all of its own energy through solar power In addition to the inclusion of sustainable technologies, the new Jaarbeurs venue will feature an accessible green roof that descends to the ground level via cascading terraces that can be reached from all four sides. The spacious green roof will house a rooftop park with a “carpet of programmable ‘squares’ and gardens” to host a wide variety of programming and renewable systems, such as water storage and energy generation. Construction of the Jaarbeurs events venue is expected to start in 2023. “It is rare that a private party not only invests in its own building but also includes the environment in its plans,” said Winy Maas, founding partner of MVRDV. “This masterplan shows that Jaarbeurs is passionate about the city and dares to think outside the box. This is desperately needed, because this underutilized area has the potential to become a fantastic neighborhood with the venue as its core — an attractive green ‘hill’ in the city. The plan is also an opportunity to significantly improve the city and properly connect the center, the station area, the Merwede Canal zone and the Kanaleneiland.” + MVRDV Images via MVRDV

Here is the original post:
MVRDV’s garden oasis in Utrecht includes a green-roofed convention center

Solar-powered Dutch home produces all of its own energy with surplus to spare

December 5, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Solar-powered Dutch home produces all of its own energy with surplus to spare

When Marjo Dashorst and Han Roebers set their sights on designing a sustainable home in Zutphen, a municipality on the east side of the Netherlands, the couple turned to Amsterdam-based practice Attika Architekten to realize their dream. The goal was to develop an energy-efficient home that would not only meet all of its own energy needs through renewable systems but also be capable of producing enough surplus energy to charge an electric car . The resulting project, aptly titled the Energy Plant House, combines solar panels, passive solar strategies and a highly insulating envelope to achieve its energy-plus goals. In contrast to its more traditional, gable-roofed neighbors, the Energy Plant House sports a contemporary, boxy appearance. The three-bedroom home is spread out across two floors: a ground-floor volume clad in sand-lime brick and a partially cantilevered upper volume wrapped in reclaimed 60-year-old Azobé campshedding planks. Reused Stelcon plates anchor the terraces. Large sliding glass doors on the north and south sides of the home create a seamless connection between indoors and out. Related: Snøhetta completes world’s northernmost energy-positive building To meet the client’s goals of an energy-plus home, the architects installed 32 rooftop solar panels with a capacity of 9.6 kW. Energy production is supplemented with a 8kW heat pump with a closed source at a depth of 180 meters as well as a heat exchanger in the ventilation system. Energy efficiency is optimized with a well-insulated envelope and vegetated roofs. Strategically located windows — from the skylights to the tall east and west windows — flood the interior with natural light despite the northern orientation. Unwanted solar gain from the south end is mitigated with an overhang from the cantilevered upper volume; advanced remote-controlled outdoor awnings have also been installed to shade the residents from harsh sunlight. + Attika Architekten Photography by Kees Hummel Fotografie via Attika Architekten

Originally posted here:
Solar-powered Dutch home produces all of its own energy with surplus to spare

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1920 access attempts in the last 7 days.