Arctic explorer tests the RIKR recycled plastic backpack

November 30, 2020 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Arctic explorer tests the RIKR recycled plastic backpack

Often when products claim to be made from recycled materials , companies are only talking about the bulk of the item. When it comes to Groundtruth’s RIKR recycled backpack, every single component is 100% recycled, from the main body to the padding, buckles, binding, webbing, zippers, hardware and even the thread that binds it all together. Most of the backpack, such as the outer shell, side panels and webbing, is made from recycled PET bottles, but the rest comes from recycled textiles like nylon, fleece and felt. Groundtruth was founded in 2017 by a team of three sisters who brought their documentary filmmaking talents and technical fabrics specialties together to create a progressive line of sustainable travel products. Each item is field-tested by real experts right in the environment it was designed for, and the RIKR is no exception; polar explorer and environmentalist Robert Swan took the backpack on a journey through Norway and Antarctica to test the water-repellency, stain-resistance, durability and comfort. Related: The durable Solo New York backpack can accompany all of your adventures “If recycled plastic bottles can be made into some thing that can survive these conditions — no one can ever doubt the durability of GROUNDTRUTH,” said Swan, who was the first person to walk to both the North and South Poles unsupported. The company prides itself on design innovation and creating products that directly remove plastic waste from the environment. All products, including the RIKR recycled backpack, are made from 100% recycled materials and by Bluesign-approved manufacturers to ensure responsible and sustainable working conditions. Additionally, the company offsets its entire carbon footprint. Priced at $382, the high-performance RIKR Backpack boasts modular compartments, multiple pockets, a separate laptop compartment, side access and a trolley sleeve, making it airport security-friendly and adaptable. Each backpack comes packaged in a completely biodegradable cassava bag and removes 120 plastic bottles from the environment, according to Groundtruth. Every purchase is carbon-neutral thanks to the company’s offset program, but buyers can choose to go even further by opting to go carbon-negative at checkout. + Groundtruth Via Dezeen Images via Groundtruth

View original here: 
Arctic explorer tests the RIKR recycled plastic backpack

YY Nation shoes are made from bamboo, algae, pineapple and sugarcane

November 9, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on YY Nation shoes are made from bamboo, algae, pineapple and sugarcane

Tens of thousands of years ago, early hunter-gatherers braved frozen landscapes to go in search of food. And on their feet, they weren’t wearing nylon, plastic or synthetic materials. They were wearing natural materials. YY Nation does the exact same thing with its incredible new footwear collection. These shoes are made with pineapple husk , bamboo, sugarcane, algae and Merino wool. Why would you need nylon and plastic when there are durable, natural materials like that available? YY Nation says you don’t. Imagine a beautiful beach in Hawaii. A man is walking along the sand with his daughter. They can hear birds singing. They can see the breathtaking ocean lapping against the shore. Then they look down … and see plastic waste and old shoes. This is what happened to Jeremy Bank. After that experience, he created YY Nation. Related: Native Shoes’ Bloom collection is made of repurposed algae Shoes can be stylish, comfortable and still good for the environment; YY Nation is the proof. After launching on Kickstarter, YY Nation began to receive orders worldwide. That makes sense, because YY Nation footwear was created to improve the whole world — in style, of course. These shoes look trendy and fashionable. They are available in a variety of colors, but best of all, they are made with Earth-friendly materials that won’t leave a bunch of waste behind on the beach or anywhere else. The collection includes four styles: loafers, two types of sneakers and high-tops. Not only do these shoes look great, but they’re also odor-resistant, durable and temperature-regulating, so your feet stay comfortable. YY Nation’s goal is to be the most sustainable shoe in the world. These shoes are made with ocean plastics, recycled rubber, sustainably sourced bamboo , algae bloom and other natural materials. They are held together with an eco-friendly, water-based glue. Even the shoeboxes are made with recycled materials, and the shoe laces are made from recycled ocean plastic. This is how the world becomes better: one step at a time. + YY Nation Images via YY Nation

Read more here: 
YY Nation shoes are made from bamboo, algae, pineapple and sugarcane

U.S. contributes 5 times more ocean plastic than previous estimates

November 3, 2020 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on U.S. contributes 5 times more ocean plastic than previous estimates

The U.S. is contributing up to five times more plastic pollution to the oceans than previously thought, according to a follow-up study published in Science Advances . The study was a sequel to 2015 research, which had given a rough estimate of the waste contribution by the U.S. The new study has now revealed that Americans contributed between 1.1 and 2.2 million metric tons of plastic to the oceans in 2016. This figure is almost double the higher end of the estimates from 2015 and five times more than the lowest estimates in the earlier predictions. The study has revealed that Americans are using more plastic than ever before. The data included American waste exports that were not accounted for in their previous studies. About 88% of the country’s waste exports goes to countries with poor recycling infrastructure. Recent developments have shown that much of the plastic waste that is exported does not go through recycling systems and ends up in the oceans. Related: Flow of plastic waste in the ocean could triple by 2040 “When you consider how much of our plastic waste isn’t actually recyclable because it is low-value, contaminated, or difficult to process, it’s not surprising that a lot of it ends up polluting the environment,” said Kara Lavender Law, lead author and research professor of oceanography at the Sea Education Association. Data analysis is an important aspect that must be employed in the management of plastic waste . According to Tony Walker, an associate professor at the Dalhousie University School for Resource and Environmental Studies, there is a lack of data standards across municipalities. The researchers are now emphasizing the need to get accurate information when it comes to plastic pollution. As reported by The New York Times , only 9% of the country’s total waste goes into the recycling system. Unfortunately, there is no guarantee that such waste will actually be made into new items. Plastic recycling has proven to be quite expensive, making it unrealistic for plastic manufactures to use recycled plastic. + Science Advances Via The New York Times Image via Brian Yurasits

Read more: 
U.S. contributes 5 times more ocean plastic than previous estimates

Study shows denim microfibers are polluting our waters

September 9, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Study shows denim microfibers are polluting our waters

A new study shows that jeans are releasing up to 56,000 denim microfibers per wash into lakes and oceans. The study, which was published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology Letters found that denim microfibers have infiltrated waters all the way from the Great Lakes to the Arctic Ocean. The study was conducted to show the extent of human-caused pollution . “It’s not an indictment of jeans — I want to be really clear that we’re not coming down on jeans,” said Miriam Diamond, environmental scientist at the University of Toronto and one of the authors of the study. Related: Wear jeans on your eyes with these funky sunglasses made of upcycled denim Scientists and environmentalists have known for some time that microplastics from synthetic clothing find their way into the oceans. One study estimates that about two trucks’ worth of microplastics drain into waters around Europe via wastewater from washing machines every day. Scientists have found microfibers in the stomachs of marine creatures, although the impact of these tiny plastic particles is still unknown. Much of the world is wearing denim at any given moment. To determine the effect of this popular garment, scientists carried out research on lake and ocean waters. The research looked at samples of water collected from the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, suburban lakes around Toronto and the Great Lakes. According to the American Chemical Society, the samples tested revealed that the lakes near Toronto had the lowest percentage of denim microfibers at 12%. The Arctic waters had 20% denim microfiber pollution, while the Great Lakes had 23%. The researchers also found that new jeans release more microfibers — up to 56,000 denim microfibers — per wash than used jeans. “They’re called ‘natural’ textile fibers,” Sam Athey, coauthor of the study, explained. “I’m doing air quotes around ‘natural’ because they contain these chemical additives. They also pick up chemicals from the environment, when you’re wearing your clothes, when they’re in the closet.” The impact of denim microfibers on the environment requires more research, but the study authors recommend buying used jeans, installing a filter on your washer and washing denim less frequently to cut back on the amount of microfibers released into waterways. + Environmental Science and Technology Letters Via EcoWatch Image via Stux

View original here: 
Study shows denim microfibers are polluting our waters

COVID-19 reduces UK carbon emissions by 30 million metric tons

August 4, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on COVID-19 reduces UK carbon emissions by 30 million metric tons

Toward the end of March, the coronavirus pandemic began to take over in many European countries. Since then, major cities across the world have experienced some form of lockdown. While the virus has come at many costs, the lockdowns have had some positive environmental impacts. Research carried out by The Eco Experts between the months of March and July has revealed that carbon dioxide emissions in the U.K. dropped significantly — by 30 million metric tons — due to reduced travel and power consumption. The report shows that carbon emissions have dropped in five key areas: public transport, road vehicles, air travel, energy usage and pollution in London. In the past 3 months, public transport journeys have dropped to a mere 11.7% of normal levels, leading to 1.89 million metric tons less of carbon emissions. Further, road journeys decreased to 52.6% of normal levels, leading to a reduction of 15.2 million metric tons of carbon emissions. Related: Coronavirus and its impact on carbon emissions Besides public transport and road vehicles, the study also surveyed air transport and energy consumption throughout the U.K. It found that there were 295,713 fewer flights than normal. This led to a 6.9 million metric ton reduction in CO2 emissions. However, the study established that there has been an increase in domestic power consumption, which rose by 30%. On the flip side, the overall power consumption reduced by 15%, because of the reduction in power demand in businesses. Since March, most major industries have either been closed or have reduced production. Consequently, less power has been consumed over this period. In this sector, the U.K. has saved up to 6.4 million metric tons of CO2 emissions . The reduction in power consumption and transport has impacted emissions in many cities. The analysis took a closer look at U.K.’s most polluted city, London, and found that the restrictions have led to a reduction of 1.17 million metric tons of CO2 emissions. Further, there has been a 26% reduction in nitrogen dioxide in central London . Globally, there have been significant drops in greenhouse gas emissions over the past few months. As the world struggles with the coronavirus pandemic, it is a time to reflect and look for the positives. We could take some lessons from this pandemic that will help us care for the environment in the future. + The Eco Experts Image via Liushuquan

See the rest here: 
COVID-19 reduces UK carbon emissions by 30 million metric tons

5 communications tips to market sustainability

April 7, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on 5 communications tips to market sustainability

Research shows three factors keep consumers from choosing products that are better for the environment: confusion; trust gaps; and not enough information. Here’s how to get around that.

The rest is here:
5 communications tips to market sustainability

Laundry Detergent: Powder, Pour, or Pods?

February 26, 2020 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Laundry Detergent: Powder, Pour, or Pods?

Cleaning up the environment is a big task, but one … The post Laundry Detergent: Powder, Pour, or Pods? appeared first on Earth911.com.

Continued here:
Laundry Detergent: Powder, Pour, or Pods?

The climate case for construction

January 2, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on The climate case for construction

Buildings have an outsize impact on the environment. But there are solutions to make construction more efficient, resilient and safer.

Continued here:
The climate case for construction

Method’s Saskia Van Gendt on its Chicago manufacturing factory and recyclability

November 14, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Method’s Saskia Van Gendt on its Chicago manufacturing factory and recyclability

Saskia Van Gendt says there seems to be new energy around companies’ responsibility to take care of the environment.

Here is the original:
Method’s Saskia Van Gendt on its Chicago manufacturing factory and recyclability

Consumers need more affordable access to healthy and sustainable living

November 13, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Consumers need more affordable access to healthy and sustainable living

New research shows that Americans are increasingly concerned about the environment, but don’t currently have lifestyles that reflect that.

Read the original:
Consumers need more affordable access to healthy and sustainable living

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1963 access attempts in the last 7 days.