Study shows denim microfibers are polluting our waters

September 9, 2020 by  
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A new study shows that jeans are releasing up to 56,000 denim microfibers per wash into lakes and oceans. The study, which was published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology Letters found that denim microfibers have infiltrated waters all the way from the Great Lakes to the Arctic Ocean. The study was conducted to show the extent of human-caused pollution . “It’s not an indictment of jeans — I want to be really clear that we’re not coming down on jeans,” said Miriam Diamond, environmental scientist at the University of Toronto and one of the authors of the study. Related: Wear jeans on your eyes with these funky sunglasses made of upcycled denim Scientists and environmentalists have known for some time that microplastics from synthetic clothing find their way into the oceans. One study estimates that about two trucks’ worth of microplastics drain into waters around Europe via wastewater from washing machines every day. Scientists have found microfibers in the stomachs of marine creatures, although the impact of these tiny plastic particles is still unknown. Much of the world is wearing denim at any given moment. To determine the effect of this popular garment, scientists carried out research on lake and ocean waters. The research looked at samples of water collected from the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, suburban lakes around Toronto and the Great Lakes. According to the American Chemical Society, the samples tested revealed that the lakes near Toronto had the lowest percentage of denim microfibers at 12%. The Arctic waters had 20% denim microfiber pollution, while the Great Lakes had 23%. The researchers also found that new jeans release more microfibers — up to 56,000 denim microfibers — per wash than used jeans. “They’re called ‘natural’ textile fibers,” Sam Athey, coauthor of the study, explained. “I’m doing air quotes around ‘natural’ because they contain these chemical additives. They also pick up chemicals from the environment, when you’re wearing your clothes, when they’re in the closet.” The impact of denim microfibers on the environment requires more research, but the study authors recommend buying used jeans, installing a filter on your washer and washing denim less frequently to cut back on the amount of microfibers released into waterways. + Environmental Science and Technology Letters Via EcoWatch Image via Stux

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Study shows denim microfibers are polluting our waters

COVID-19 reduces UK carbon emissions by 30 million metric tons

August 4, 2020 by  
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Toward the end of March, the coronavirus pandemic began to take over in many European countries. Since then, major cities across the world have experienced some form of lockdown. While the virus has come at many costs, the lockdowns have had some positive environmental impacts. Research carried out by The Eco Experts between the months of March and July has revealed that carbon dioxide emissions in the U.K. dropped significantly — by 30 million metric tons — due to reduced travel and power consumption. The report shows that carbon emissions have dropped in five key areas: public transport, road vehicles, air travel, energy usage and pollution in London. In the past 3 months, public transport journeys have dropped to a mere 11.7% of normal levels, leading to 1.89 million metric tons less of carbon emissions. Further, road journeys decreased to 52.6% of normal levels, leading to a reduction of 15.2 million metric tons of carbon emissions. Related: Coronavirus and its impact on carbon emissions Besides public transport and road vehicles, the study also surveyed air transport and energy consumption throughout the U.K. It found that there were 295,713 fewer flights than normal. This led to a 6.9 million metric ton reduction in CO2 emissions. However, the study established that there has been an increase in domestic power consumption, which rose by 30%. On the flip side, the overall power consumption reduced by 15%, because of the reduction in power demand in businesses. Since March, most major industries have either been closed or have reduced production. Consequently, less power has been consumed over this period. In this sector, the U.K. has saved up to 6.4 million metric tons of CO2 emissions . The reduction in power consumption and transport has impacted emissions in many cities. The analysis took a closer look at U.K.’s most polluted city, London, and found that the restrictions have led to a reduction of 1.17 million metric tons of CO2 emissions. Further, there has been a 26% reduction in nitrogen dioxide in central London . Globally, there have been significant drops in greenhouse gas emissions over the past few months. As the world struggles with the coronavirus pandemic, it is a time to reflect and look for the positives. We could take some lessons from this pandemic that will help us care for the environment in the future. + The Eco Experts Image via Liushuquan

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COVID-19 reduces UK carbon emissions by 30 million metric tons

5 communications tips to market sustainability

April 7, 2020 by  
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Research shows three factors keep consumers from choosing products that are better for the environment: confusion; trust gaps; and not enough information. Here’s how to get around that.

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5 communications tips to market sustainability

Laundry Detergent: Powder, Pour, or Pods?

February 26, 2020 by  
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Cleaning up the environment is a big task, but one … The post Laundry Detergent: Powder, Pour, or Pods? appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Laundry Detergent: Powder, Pour, or Pods?

The climate case for construction

January 2, 2020 by  
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Buildings have an outsize impact on the environment. But there are solutions to make construction more efficient, resilient and safer.

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The climate case for construction

Method’s Saskia Van Gendt on its Chicago manufacturing factory and recyclability

November 14, 2019 by  
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Saskia Van Gendt says there seems to be new energy around companies’ responsibility to take care of the environment.

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Method’s Saskia Van Gendt on its Chicago manufacturing factory and recyclability

Consumers need more affordable access to healthy and sustainable living

November 13, 2019 by  
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New research shows that Americans are increasingly concerned about the environment, but don’t currently have lifestyles that reflect that.

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Consumers need more affordable access to healthy and sustainable living

Does water stewardship lead to brand value?

November 13, 2019 by  
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Performance can be transparently communicated through certification, helping build intangible value.

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Does water stewardship lead to brand value?

Will iconic red beer pong cups be replaced by aluminum?

September 3, 2019 by  
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Used for decades at family picnics, beach parties and beer pong games, the familiar red plastic SOLO cup might be headed for extinction thanks to a sleek, aluminum alternative that is endlessly reusable . Founded by Leo Hulseman in 1936, the SOLO Cup Co. is facing some fierce competition that is promising to be better for the environment — a reusable, aluminum cup created by Ball Corp., the same company behind the beacon of sustainability that is the mason jar. Related: Coca-Cola to offer Dasani water in aluminum cans and bottles to reduce plastic waste The aluminum cups were recently introduced to some colleges and will soon be tested in other venues. The cups should be available for retail by 2021, John Hayes, CEO of Ball Corp., told Bloomberg . When they do hit the market, expect to pay 25 cents per reusable cup, versus an average 17 cents per disposable SOLO cup. “The aluminum cup is a game-changer for the industry,” Sebastian Siethoff, Ball Corp.’s general manager, told Packaging Digest . “We hope that our customers and consumers view the aluminum cup as a sustainable and easily recyclable alternative to plastic cups, which are currently a mainstay of stadiums, restaurants and beaches and often end up in the trash or on the ground.” As more and more consumers ditch plastic to reduce their carbon footprint, aluminum continues to be a popular choice for cups and cans. Aluminum cans are considered the most sustainable beverage package and are forever recyclable; the average can contains 70 percent recycled metal. Ball Corp. has done its homework and found that 67 percent of U.S. consumers would visit a venue offering aluminum cups more frequently, and they are willing to pay the extra cost for reusable cups. “We think they’re willing to make that choice,” Hayes told Bloomberg. “They know we’ve polluted our world, and they want to do something about it.” Ball Corp. said the cups will be produced in different sizes and can be personalized with designs, logos and more, further enticing consumers to make the switch. + Ball Corp. Via EcoWatch , Packaging Digest and Bloomberg Image via Ball Corp.

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Will iconic red beer pong cups be replaced by aluminum?

Ron Gonen, Erika Karp and Emily Landsburg: Financing circularity & unlocking catalytic capital

July 15, 2019 by  
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Ron Gonen, Erika Karp and Emily Landsburg discuss how stakeholders are beginning to unlock value and create a lasting positive impact on the environment as they pivot towards circularity.

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Ron Gonen, Erika Karp and Emily Landsburg: Financing circularity & unlocking catalytic capital

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