Impossible Foods is testing revolutionary plant-based milk

October 26, 2020 by  
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What Impossible Foods has done for veggie burgers — created something that looks, tastes and bleeds like meat — the food technology company is now doing for milk. Impossible Foods has unveiled that it is developing a plant-based milk that mimics the taste, texture and functionality of dairy milk. When plant-based milks already fill multiple shelves in health food stores across America, why do we need more? “The plant-based alternatives that are out there are inadequate,” said Impossible Foods CEO Patrick O. Brown, as reported by CNBC . “The reality is that if they weren’t, there wouldn’t be a dairy market.” Consumers want milk that doesn’t separate when stirred into hot coffee. The new Impossible Foods plant-based milk won’t separate, as demonstrated by the company’s food scientists in a press conference. Related: Impossible Foods debuts plant-based pork at CES That dairy market is shrinking, while plant-based products are on the rise. Last year, non-dairy milks brought in $1.8 billion. But Brown won’t rest until there’s no meat or milk market left at all. His goal is to substitute plant-based alternatives for all animal-derived foods by 2035. Brown has called animal agriculture “the world’s most destructive technology” and is on a mission to save the world from global warming by providing faux products to please mainstream tastes. Because as we all know by now, people aren’t going to change their habits just because they’re destroying the planet. A launch date has not yet been announced for the product, which is still in the development stage. Since its founding in 2011, Impossible Foods has raised $1.5 billion in investment capital. Its next R&D goals include creating life-like fish, steak and bacon. Brown is not skimping on a smart workforce. In a press conference last week, he invited engineers and scientists to join the company’s Impossible Investigator Project. “Whatever else you may be doing, it’s a drop in the bucket compared to the impact you can have here with our project,” he said. “Leave your stupid job and come join us.” + Impossible Foods Via VegNews and CNBC Image via Pixabay

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Impossible Foods is testing revolutionary plant-based milk

Hothouse installation grows tropical plants in the middle of London

October 26, 2020 by  
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London-based architecture practice Studio Weave has filled a greenhouse with tropical plants in London to highlight the reality of climate change. Known as Hothouse, the large-scale installation project is located at International Quarter London, a business development built in a subdivision of Stratford and close to Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park. The design is inspired by a Victorian glasshouse, and at 7 meters tall, the installation is held up using a galvanized steel frame and cables. The structure provides a controlled environment specifically for cultivating warm-weather plants that are unsuitable to the U.K.’s climate. It is reminiscent of the 20-mile stretch of land across the Lee Valley corridor, which once housed more than 1,300 acres of greenhouse in the 1930s. These greenhouses of the past famously facilitated the production of ornamental flowers and tropical crops like grapes and cucumbers that wouldn’t normally grow in the region. Related: Student designs inflatable bamboo greenhouses for sustainable farming Poised to be on display for at least a year, the new Hothouse will be expertly regulated to help these same types of plants thrive once again. Working with garden designer Tom Massey, the architects at Studio Weave developed a cultivation plan to include plants from all over the world: guava, orange, squash, chia, avocado, pomegranate, quinoa, mango, sweet potato, lemon, sugarcane, chickpea, loquat and pineapple. It’s not just about growing tropical crops; the Hothouse is also designed to highlight the rapidly changing climate . The project serves as a warning to the idea that, should global warming continue to accelerate as some scientists predict, the U.K.’s climate could potentially become warm enough to grow these tropical plants outside by 2050. “Amid the strangeness of the COVID era of the last few months, reduced human activity has produced what feels like a profound shift in the environment, progressing a much-needed dialogue that will hopefully translate into sustained action and change,” said Je Ahn, founder of Studio Weave. “We hope this little hot house acts as a continual reminder of our fragile relationship with nature, while allowing us to rediscover the simple and enriching pleasure of looking after beautiful plants.” + Studio Weave Via Dezeen Images via Studio Weave

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Hothouse installation grows tropical plants in the middle of London

Community collects locally sourced materials to construct a school in Vietnam

May 4, 2020 by  
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The Xuan Hoa commune in the Lao Cai province of northwest Vietnam is, like much of the surrounding area, a region that has suffered from economic hardships in the past. A large number of households in Xuan Hoa live in extreme poverty, including many of the school district’s 78 students aged 6 to 11 years old. The new Dao school by 1+1>2 Architects was completed in 2019 to provide provide education to the area’s children in first through fifth grades. All of the students are ethnic minorities from the Tay, Nung, Dao and Mong groups; this multicultural aspect was a strong motivating factor in the development of the project. A combination of shared open spaces and a school yard helps inspire students from different groups to interact. Related: A clean-energy school in southern France draws power from the sun The former school housed five classrooms, two of which were temporary structures for students from grade four and five, and was very vulnerable. The original structures were made of deteriorating wood and were close to collapse, damaged and fitted with years of poorly adapted repair jobs. The new school was developed by the Vietnam Sustainability Social Enterprise and coordinated, designed and constructed by 1+1>2 Architects. Vietnam-based Transsolar advised on the climate aspects of the project, which included an open-style concept to join bricks with a specified wall thickness of 15 centimeters for the main structure. This concept keeps the school interior at a comfortable temperature for the students and teachers by taking advantage of the daylight and wind to help cool down the building during the hot summer months. More than 3,000 bricks were crafted from local soil to build the school; over 4,000 dried leaves were collected by the community for the traditional thatched roof. + 1+1>2 Architects Via ArchDaily Photography by Son Vu via 1+1>2 Architects

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Community collects locally sourced materials to construct a school in Vietnam

Why Autodesk is investing in an urban prefab construction startup

July 11, 2019 by  
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The software company’s strategic investment in Factory OS includes goals for impact metrics such as waste reduction, jobs creation potential and how the collaboration can stimulate the development of more affordable housing.

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Why Autodesk is investing in an urban prefab construction startup

Why hydrogen fuel cells are a boon for the military

September 27, 2017 by  
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About a decade ago, the United States federal and state governments began experimenting with hydrogen fuel cells, said Stan Osserman, director of the Hawaii center for advanced transportation technologies. The push was driven by high oil prices at the time. As the prices tapered, however, the development kept going. “The prices have come down and the weight has come down on [hydrogren fuel] equipment,” said Osserman. “Lots of companies are realizing this is a good business case on its own.” 

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The SDGs, one year in: Where do we stand?

September 24, 2016 by  
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It’s hard to believe it’s already been one year since the global adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals.The past year has been about enhancing understanding and appreciation of the development agenda the SDGs represent, and gradually accepting that within this new global framework, all countries are in need of further development.

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The SDGs, one year in: Where do we stand?

Integrated reporting as a strategic initiative

August 16, 2016 by  
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It’s time for integrated thinking — or the development of business models, strategies and decision-making that integrate concerns for society and the environment into the pursuit of profitability — in integrated reporting.

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Integrated reporting as a strategic initiative

Two solar power plants usher in “the birth of large-scale solar in Australia”

January 25, 2016 by  
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Australia isn’t known as a ‘sunburned country’ for no reason. The sun-drenched continent is the perfect place for solar power generation. For some time, the land down under has boasted the highest rate of residential solar panel installations, but it’s been lagging behind in the development of large-scale solar projects . All of that is set to change as two solar power plants have officially opened for business . Read the rest of Two solar power plants usher in “the birth of large-scale solar in Australia”

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Two solar power plants usher in “the birth of large-scale solar in Australia”

BVN Donovan Hill’s Wooden Emergency Shelter Pops-up in Federation Square, Melbourne

May 3, 2013 by  
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How good design can have a role in the healing of a community has been conceptually explored by BVN Donovan Hill in their first working prototype of an emergency shelter. The design is part of the  Emergency Shelter Exhibition will be on display in Federation Square, Melbourne, until May 5, 2013, and it is one of many emergency shelters created by leading Australian architecture practices. The purpose of the event is to engage architects in the development of various types of shelters that can be assembled by non-skilled labor in one day. Read the rest of BVN Donovan Hill’s Wooden Emergency Shelter Pops-up in Federation Square, Melbourne Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: BVN Donovan Hill , Emergency housing , emergency shelter , popup house , popup shelters , prefab shelter , ready made emergency shelter        

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BVN Donovan Hill’s Wooden Emergency Shelter Pops-up in Federation Square, Melbourne

Oman Plans Construction Of Massive 200 MW Desert Solar Farm

July 31, 2012 by  
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Oman, which boasts the one of the highest solar energy densities in the world, is currently investigating the development of a 200MW solar photovoltaic (PV) and concentrating solar power (CSP) project. If the project gets the go-ahead, then the solar farm could generate the entire country’s electricity supply from simply using a tiny percentage of the desert for its solar collectors, dramatically reducing the state’s dependence on domestic oil. Read the rest of Oman Plans Construction Of Massive 200 MW Desert Solar Farm Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “solar energy” , 200mw solar farm , alternative energy , concentrating solar power , middle east solar energy , oman , solar farm , solar photovoltaic , Solar Power , Sultanate of Oman

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Oman Plans Construction Of Massive 200 MW Desert Solar Farm

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