Eos Bioreactor uses AI and algae to combat climate change

July 3, 2020 by  
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A new artificial intelligence invention by Hypergiant Industries could prove to be the solution to the world’s carbon dioxide problem. The company is launching the second generation Eos Bioreactor, currently still a prototype, that can be used to absorb excess carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and give out oxygen. Besides its ability to reduce environmental pollution, the new AI-based bioreactor also improves health. The excessive presence of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has led to a steady rise in the average global temperatures over the years. A National Geographic report states that ocean levels will rise by up to 2.3 feet by 2050 due to melting glaciers. This is just one of many problems that are brought about by excessive carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Terrestrial radiation, which is supposed to be absorbed by the ozone layer, is also retained in the atmosphere. This leads to the greenhouse effect, where the globe is overheated. Related: New map exposes secrets of Antarctica’s green snow The Eos Bioreactor seeks to reduce the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to address climate change. Traditionally, the world relies on forests to absorb excess carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and produce more oxygen. However, deforestation in major forests across the world has greatly affected the effectiveness of this approach. For instance, deforestation of Amazon increased by 34% in 2019. Such challenges make it unrealistic for the world to continue relying solely on forests to combat climate change. Technology like the Eos Bioreactor could help address these issues. According to the manufacturer, the AI-based technology is more effective because each boosted algae bioreactor is 400 times faster in capturing carbon dioxide than trees in the same unit area. Simply put, a single 3-foot by 3-foot bioreactor can absorb the equivalence of the carbon dioxide captured by an acre of forested land. Besides absorbing carbon dioxide, the bioreactor also monitors airflow, bio-density, pH, type of light and harvest cycles. Because it can be used in a home or office setting, the Eos Bioreactor can completely monitor and purify the quality of the air you breath. Why use the Eos Bioreactor According to the CDC, climate change has an effect on human health . Climate change disrupts the quality of natural air, resulting in respiratory and cardiovascular complications. Extreme weather changes can lead to serious cardiovascular injuries and even death. The effects of climate change can also contribute to stress in food production and lead to malnutrition. According to Hypergiant Industries, Eos Bioreactor technology can help reduce such effects. How the Eos Bioreactor works Algae require high levels of carbon dioxide to thrive. The bioreactor provides the right environment to grow algae, which can consume most of the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. However, the system is much more complex than that. Besides exposing algae to the atmosphere for carbon dioxide absorption, the system uses artificial intelligence to control the lighting, airflow, temperature and other factors of the environment. Such factors facilitate the accelerated rate of carbon dioxide absorption and processing. The bioreactor works in 5 key processes: Air intake: The air intake absorbs open air in a room or can be connected to a building exhaust. Once absorbed, the air is bubbled into the bioreactor tank, where it combines with algae. Growing algae : For the algae to grow, it needs carbon dioxide and light. Once carbon dioxide has been pumped into the bioreactor tank, the algae have to be exposed to light. The algae and water are pumped through tubes to maximize exposure to light. They mix with carbon dioxide in the bioreactor tank for the process to commence. Biomass accretion : Once the algae and carbon dioxide are mixed, the algae consume carbon dioxide to produce biomass. The biomass is harvested to create fuel, oils and high-protein foods and fertilizer. Harvesting and separation: The Eos Bioreactor uses AI to control the harvesting process. The harvesting system allows the reactor to retain the maximum amount of algae to suck up carbon dioxide. Clean air exhaust: Once the system uses carbon dioxide to produce biomass, it also consumes all the impurities in the air. As a result, 60% to 90% of the carbon dioxide input is consumed. The resulting oxygen-rich, clean air is released to the environment. The shape and appearance of the bioreactor The Eos Bioreactor measures 3-feet-by-3-feet-by-7-feet and is designed to fit in small spaces, including offices and homes. The bioreactor has options for solar power connections, which will make it usable in remote regions. The power used in running the system is minimal, and the waste produced can be utilized for other purposes. About Hypergiant Industries Hypergiant Industries is a company that focuses on providing solutions to current humanitarian challenges. One of the biggest challenges that humans face today is climate change. The development of the AI-powered bioreactor is one of many projects spearheaded by the company. Hypergiant Industries is working on several environment-focused products and solutions for clients including governments and Fortune 500. + Hypergiant Industries Images via Hypergiant Industries

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Eos Bioreactor uses AI and algae to combat climate change

Atmospheric carbon dioxide at highest level in 3 million years

February 27, 2020 by  
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Carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere are now at the highest level they’ve been since the Pilocene Era, 3 million years ago, when giant camels roamed arid land above the Arctic Circle. According to a new National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration ( NOAA ) report, in 2018, the global average carbon dioxide amount reached a record high of 407.4 parts per million (ppm). NOAA points a finger directly at humans, noting that the atmospheric carbon dioxide has increased about 100 times faster annually over the past 60 years than from previous natural increases. “Carbon dioxide concentrations are rising mostly because of the fossil fuels that people are burning for energy,” the report said. “Fossil fuels like coal and oil contain carbon that plants pulled out of the atmosphere through photosynthesis over the span of many millions of years; we are returning that carbon to the atmosphere in just a few hundred years.” Related: Pacific Ocean’s elevated acidity is dissolving Dungeness crabs’ shells Globally, atmospheric carbon dioxide increased about 0.6 ppm per year in the 1960s. In the last 10 years, this figure has been about 2.3 ppm per year, the study said. Carbon dioxide absorbs and radiates heat more than other major atmospheric components, such as oxygen or nitrogen. The NOAA report likens greenhouse gases to bricks in a fireplace that continue to release heat after the fire goes out. This warming effect is necessary to keep Earth’s temperature above freezing — up to a point. But once the level gets out of balance, these greenhouse gas “bricks” trap too much heat and make the Earth’s average temperature continue to rise. Carbon dioxide also dissolves into the oceans , where it reacts with water molecules to produce carbonic acid and lower pH levels. Since the Industrial Revolution began in the late 18th century, the ocean’s pH has dropped significantly, interfering with marine animals’ ability to fortify their shells and skeletons by extracting calcium from the water. “For millions of years, we haven’t had an atmosphere with a chemical composition as it is right now,” Martin Siegert, co-director of the Grantham Institute at Imperial College London, told NBC News . “We’ve done in a little more than 50 years what the Earth naturally took 10,000 years to do.” + NOAA Via EcoWatch and NBC News Image via Marcin Jozwiak

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Atmospheric carbon dioxide at highest level in 3 million years

Teeny, tiny creatures play a big role in climate change

July 11, 2019 by  
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Tiny bacteria, protozoa and fungi in agricultural systems contribute methane into the atmosphere — and they’re spreading.

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Teeny, tiny creatures play a big role in climate change

Carbon pricing and the journey towards an ‘energy constrained world’

July 11, 2019 by  
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An international system to curb energy use may be the only way to lift people out of poverty while preserving the planet.

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Carbon pricing and the journey towards an ‘energy constrained world’

Fake trees could help in the fight against climate change

February 6, 2019 by  
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One of the best ways to fight climate change is to invest in trees and plants. Branches and leaves help trap carbon dioxide, effectively reducing overall pollution in the atmosphere. The only hurdle is that trees take up a lot of land and resources to cultivate, which is why scientists are turning to an alternative source in the fight against carbon emissions. Scientists in Germany just published a new study about how artificial plant life can also cut down on carbon pollution . The team created an artificial system that absorbs carbon dioxide and turns it into a product that is rich in carbon, like alcohol. The system then releases oxygen into the air and captures any excess carbon byproducts for later use. Related: How to teach children about climate change The artificial system is actually more effective than what plants and trees do naturally. In fact, some experts believe this new technology is about 1,000 times better than its natural counterpart. This is significant, because there is not enough room on the planet for trees and plants to absorb the amount of carbon we are currently emitting into the atmosphere. Although artificial trees might be the answer to help curb carbon emissions, there is one catch to the system. According to The Guardian , the cost of installing artificial trees is beyond the reach of most communities. Starting a small forest of artificial trees costs close to a quarter of a million dollars, and that is just to get the ball rolling. Scientists hope to decrease that price point in the near future, but that will only happen once technology progresses and investors get more interested in funding research. If scientists can lower the cost of artificial trees, then it might be our best option for capturing  carbon emissions. But this technology is competing against other methods of removing carbon from the air, so only time will tell if artificial systems are the answer to the growing problem of climate change. Via The Guardian  and  Popular Science Image via Pixabay

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Fake trees could help in the fight against climate change

Reduction is no longer enough: Welcome to the new age of carbon removal

October 23, 2018 by  
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A heightened focus on solutions for sucking CO2 out of the atmosphere.

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Reduction is no longer enough: Welcome to the new age of carbon removal

Carbon removal is our best hope to deliver on the Paris Agreement

September 19, 2016 by  
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To limit global warming to no more than 2 degrees Celsius, we’ll need to do more than reduce emissions. We’ll have to remove some carbon from the atmosphere — as a number of pioneering companies realize.

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Carbon removal is our best hope to deliver on the Paris Agreement

Carbon removal is our best hope to deliver on the Paris Agreement

September 19, 2016 by  
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To limit global warming to no more than 2 degrees Celsius, we’ll need to do more than reduce emissions. We’ll have to remove some carbon from the atmosphere — as a number of pioneering companies realize.

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Carbon removal is our best hope to deliver on the Paris Agreement

7 companies to watch in carbon capture and storage

July 14, 2016 by  
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They aim to clean up dirty fuel sources such as coal-fired power plants, while removing carbon already in the atmosphere. Will it work, and will it scale?

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7 companies to watch in carbon capture and storage

State of Green Business: Agriculture plants the seeds of regeneration

March 21, 2016 by  
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Harnessing the genius of soil to draw down greenhouse gases already in the atmosphere.

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State of Green Business: Agriculture plants the seeds of regeneration

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