DIY: How to make an enchanting terrarium necklace to keep or give as a gift

December 17, 2019 by  
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Highlight life, nature, plants and the planet all in a tiny, encapsulated terrarium. Even better, turn it into a necklace for a unique piece of jewelry that is sure to be a conversation-starter. Since natural gifts are always en vogue, consider making extras for co-workers and family. This fast and easy nature craft is also fun to make with kids. Supplies: 1 glass vial with a cork — you can select the size of your choice, but don’t make it too bulky or so tiny that it is difficult to fill. Make sure it has a hook at the top for the chain, or get a small eye-hook to screw into the cork . 1 necklace chain — keep preferred length in mind Sand or fine gravel Soil Tiny succulents Tweezers Clothespin (optional) Instructions: 1. Create support Depending on your vial, it might need support. You can use a clothespin if your vial is unable to stand up straight. Simply open the clothespin, lower the vial into place and release the clothespin around the vial. Because the bottle is small and light, the clothespin will keep it from tipping over while you work. Related: How to make your own green terrarium to keep or give away for the holidays 2. Layer Once things are secure, begin layering materials into the vial. You can do this using a toothpick, tweezers or a skewer. You can also partially roll a small piece of paper to create a tube to pour materials in. Start with your sand or fine gravel . Depending on the size of your vial or miniature glass bottle, it might take ¼ teaspoon or so. This will help with air flow and drainage. Next, add soil; any enriched soil will work. Don’t worry about these materials collecting on the sides of the glass at this point. You can clean it up to make it pretty in a later step. 3. Add creativity Part of the fun of this process is being creative with your art. Play with different living plants to create the look you want. Moss can be your centerpiece, or you can add small pieces of succulents as a focal point. Just make sure your vessel offers enough space for any greenery you add. If you choose to add succulents, select baby shoots from the base of the plant or even those that have fallen off the plant. Then, allow the stem to dry out for several days before planting it in the terrarium . This keeps it from bringing too much moisture into the terrarium. Although the vessel is small, it still needs to remain balanced for the plant to survive, meaning it shouldn’t be too wet or too dry. If you find your terrarium misting up on the sides, release the cork to let some of the moisture out. 4. Attach chain Now, attach your necklace chain to your hook. Depending on the materials you selected, this can be done by simply sliding the chain through the eye of the hook or by using a small circle to attach the eye-hook to the chain using jewelry pliers or tweezers to pinch it closed. Make sure the chain is securely attached. Test your necklace for your desired length. 5. Cork it Add a drop of water to your terrarium. If this doesn’t clean up any debris that may have collected on the sides during layering, use a damp cotton swab to wipe the sides. Use tweezers to rearrange items as desired. Look at your terrarium from all angles to ensure things are just the way you want them. Then, insert your cork into the vial, and make sure it is firmly in place. 6. Care Your plant can survive in your terrarium for a long time with proper care. Add a tiny amount of water to your terrarium every few days as needed, and be sure to avoid leaving it in direct sunlight, which can dry out your plants. If it does dry out or die, you can easily replace the living plant with another without needing to replace the other materials. Speaking of materials, you will likely have enough to make several terrarium necklaces . Consider introducing the idea to a science classroom, a senior center or as a follow-up for a field trip. Images via Inhabitat

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DIY: How to make an enchanting terrarium necklace to keep or give as a gift

How to Make a Terrarium in 5 Steps

December 19, 2017 by  
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If you’re looking to bring a little bit of the … The post How to Make a Terrarium in 5 Steps appeared first on Earth911.com.

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How to Make a Terrarium in 5 Steps

How to make your own green terrarium to keep or give away for the holidays

December 14, 2017 by  
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If you have a green thumb but minimal garden space, why not create your own mini-world full of lush and beautiful plants by making your own terrarium? If you’re in the southern hemisphere instead, remember that having green plants around is a surefire way to keep away the winter blues, plus plants are certain to help improve your indoor air quality . Terrariums are easy-to-make, low-maintenance gardens, and can last almost indefinitely with minimal water. Don’t believe us? We assembled seven terrariums of various shapes and sizes in a single weekend, and they’re all adorable. Read on for our easy terrarium DIY to learn how to make your own to keep or give away for the holidays. MATERIALS: A clear glass jar, vase, bowl, glass, or whatever interesting glass container you have on hand Rocks, pebbles or recycled glass chunks Activated charcoal (sometimes called activated carbon) Potting soil appropriate for your plants Moss (optional) Figurines, sticks or decorative items (optional) Various small plants A scoop, spoon or shovel Scissors Gloves Source your containers from a thrift store or an antique store, or just scrounge around your house for an old jar. Even simple jelly jars or canning jars can make beautiful terrariums. They can be left open or closed—it’s totally up to you. All other supplies can be bought at your local gardening center. As for the plants, the sky is the limit, but generally speaking look for small plants that you can fit inside your jar and won’t grow too tall. Some plants will have multiple stems so you can break them up even further. To ensure that your terrarium will be successful, keep succulents and cacti together, and keep fern and tropical plants together, because they require different amounts of water and soil. You’ll want cactus soil for the succulents and regular old potting soil for everything else. The rocks are used as a false drainage layer while the activated charcoal helps keep the terrarium healthy, and the moss can be used for decoration and to help soak up and retain water. STEP 1: Prepare the Container Remove any price tags or stickers from your vessel and wash both the interior and exterior thoroughly to ensure that there are no unwanted residues that could affect the health of your plants. Envision how you want to arrange your plants inside the jar. STEP 2: Add Your Drainage Layers Once the container is ready, fill the bottom with rocks or pebbles. This is to create a false drainage layer so water can settle and not flood the plant. The depth of the rocks totally depends on the size of your container, but aim for 1/2″ to 2″. STEP 3: Add the Activated Charcoal The charcoal looks exactly like what you would expect it to and it’s messy. Sometimes it comes as small granules and other times it comes as shards—either works. You don’t need much, just enough to cover the rocks. The charcoal will improve the quality of your little world including reducing bacteria, fungi and odors. Related: How to Make a Recycled Glass Terrarium STEP 4: Add Soil Again, cactus and succulents need a special soil compared to most other plants, so be sure to get the appropriate bag depending on which plants you’re using. Add enough soil so the plant roots will have plenty of room to fit and then grow. Aim for a depth slightly greater than the height of the plant’s pot. STEP 5: Plant Take your plant out of the pot and break up the hard soil ball until you get down to the roots. If you’re breaking the plant into multiple parts, be gentle. You may also want to trim the roots if they are especially long; don’t worry, they’ll grow back. Using a spoon, your fingers, the end of a brush, or even a pencil, dig a well to place your plants roots in. Add more soil around the top and compact the soil down around the base of the plant. Continue placing your little plants in the container and try to keep them away from the edges. The leaves are likely to touch the sides but aim to keep them away as much as possible. STEP 6: Add Accessories After you’re done planting you can add little accessories like a blanket of moss (dried or living), little figurines, old toys, glass beads, shiny metal object, sticks, stones, or even a layer or rocks. This is your little world and you can put whatever you’d like in there. Related: 7 Eco-Friendly Summer Crafts for Creative Adults (and Kids!) STEP 7: Clean and Water You’ll likely have dirt all over the sides of the container, so wipe them down so you can enjoy the beautiful living world inside. Give the terrarium a little bit of water. Unlike most of your house plants, a terrarium doesn’t need to soaked: just a couple of shots of water should get it started. Tips & Tricks – Over time, monitor your terrarium’s water needs based on how dry the soil is. For terrariums with closed lids, if water is dripping down from the top, open the lid to let some evaporate. Likewise, you may need to add more if it looks parched. You shouldn’t need to water them very often. – If leaves die or wilt, remove them from the terrarium immediately to maintain the health of the little eco system. If an entire plant dies, take it out. – Don’t place in direct sunlight. Remember that these are essentially little greenhouses and direct sunlight through the glass will trap heat and scorch the plants. Place in indirect light for best results. – Afterwards, enjoy your little world or give it away and make another! Lead image via Pixabay . All other images ©Bridgette Meinhold

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How to make your own green terrarium to keep or give away for the holidays

The Vivarium is a renovated industrial warehouse in Thailand turned into a terrarium-like restaurant

December 22, 2015 by  
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The Vivarium is a renovated industrial warehouse in Thailand turned into a terrarium-like restaurant

DIY: How to Make Your Own Green Terrarium

May 27, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of DIY: How to Make Your Own Green Terrarium Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: cacti , DIY , diy gift , do it yourself , eco gift , garden , Gardening , green , green design , green gift , holiday gift , how to make a terrarium , how-to , indoor air quality , indoor gardening , Indoor Plants , inhabitat DIY , MoSS , plants , succulents , terrarium , Terrariums

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DIY: How to Make Your Own Green Terrarium

7 Eco-Friendly DIY Summer Crafts for Creative Adults (and Kids!)

July 25, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of 7 Eco-Friendly DIY Summer Crafts for Creative Adults (and Kids!) Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bbq , bird feeder , crafts , DIY , eco-friendly , grill , hammock , lanterns , planter , recycled , summer , terrarium , tutorials , upcycled        

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7 Eco-Friendly DIY Summer Crafts for Creative Adults (and Kids!)

1012 Terra’s Modern Terrariums Suspend Plants in Mid-Air

June 4, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of 1012 Terra’s Modern Terrariums Suspend Plants in Mid-Air Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 1012 Terra , Daisuke Tsumanuma , eco design , green design , Kenichi Yamada , sustainable design , terrarium        

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1012 Terra’s Modern Terrariums Suspend Plants in Mid-Air

Prahran Hotel Pub Features a Facade Made From Concrete Pipes Near Melbourne

June 4, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of Prahran Hotel Pub Features a Facade Made From Concrete Pipes Near Melbourne Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , australia , culvert , Daylighting , drain pipe , eco bar , eco design , eco pub , eco restaurant , green architecture , Green Building , green design , green interior , green renovation , green restaurant , Melbourne , prahran , prahran hotel , reclaimed wood , recycled pipe , salvaged wood , Sustainable Building , sustainable design , techne architects        

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Prahran Hotel Pub Features a Facade Made From Concrete Pipes Near Melbourne

Study Finds Honey Bee Food May Contribute to Colony Collapse

June 4, 2013 by  
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Honeybees photo from Shutterstock Last winter, beekeepers in the United States lost an alarming one-third of their hives to colony collapse disorder. While many acknowledge that pesticides , climate change , and habitat loss may be be contributing factors to their decline, a new study by the University of Illinois points to yet another stressor. Honey substitutes (such as high fructose corn syrup) fed to the bees while their own honey is sold could be denying bees the nutrients they need to establish strong immune systems. Read the rest of Study Finds Honey Bee Food May Contribute to Colony Collapse Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: ban , bayer ag , beekeeper , colony collapse disorder , epa , Europe , food , high fructose corn syrup , honey , honey bee , immune system , Monsanto , national academy of sciences , neonicotinoids , p-coumaric acid , pesticides , sugar , syngenta , university of illinois , varroa mite        

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Study Finds Honey Bee Food May Contribute to Colony Collapse

INTERVIEW: Inhabitat Talks to botObjects Founders About ProDesk3D, The World’s First Full-Color 3D Printer

June 4, 2013 by  
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Just over a month ago, we showcased a product with the potential to revolutionize the still-new 3D printing industry: the ProDesk3D by botObjects . Hailed as the world’s first full-color 3D printer , the ProDesk3D allows designers to pick a desired palette and quickly print the final product with a five-color, re-usable PLA cartridge system. Since the ProDesk3D is only in the pre-order phase (and we were eager to know more), Inhabitat reached out to botObjects founders Martin Warner and Mike Duma to dig deeper into the development process of this ground-breaking product. Read on to find out why the ProDesk3D pushes the boundaries of 3D printing technology , and how it was designed to make self-fabrication accessible to a larger audience. Read the rest of INTERVIEW: Inhabitat Talks to botObjects Founders About ProDesk3D, The World’s First Full-Color 3D Printer Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 3D printers , 3D printing , botObjects , DIY , interview , Martin Warner , Mike Duma , prodesk3d , Technology        

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