The Jackson House floats at the base of a canyon in Big Sur

May 9, 2018 by  
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This beautiful home located at the base of a canyon in Big Sur is made from an array of materials, including copper and concrete. Fougeron Architecture designed the Jackson House as a modern holiday house on stilts that appears to float over the site. The house was designed as a place where the inhabitants can enjoy their weekends and reconnect with nature. Fougeron Architecture worked for three and a half years with several consultants to build the modern family retreat . Related: Gorgeous staggered timber home offers panoramic views of Idaho’s wilderness The main design challenge was to create a building that would blend into the steep canyon walls, while resting gently on the land so as not to disturb the fragile environment. The home is composed of four main volumes nestled under an over-sized butterfly roof that extends out to create covered terraces . The retreat balances the relationship between communal living and privacy. + Fougeron Architecture Via Uncrate Photos by Richard Barnes

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The Jackson House floats at the base of a canyon in Big Sur

Minimalist timber home gracefully blends into the Austrian landscape

April 10, 2018 by  
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Lovers of minimalist architecture will swoon over Innauer-Matt Architekten’s Höller House, a beautiful modern home built mainly of wood in Austria’s picturesque Bregenzerwald valley. Set in a steep hillside, the dwelling combines inspiration from traditional farm buildings with a more contemporary vibe evidenced in its gabled form and restrained minimalist palette. Light timber is used throughout the home, inside and out, and is complemented by the structural framework’s exposed concrete columns. Built of timber felled from the homeowner’s forest, the 1,428-square-foot Höller House celebrates its timber construction with exposed wooden beams and surfaces left unpainted. Natural light fills the home through large openings and skylights , but privacy is also preserved by the slatted wooden facade and intentionally hidden entrance. Related: Handsome Austrian house is clad in a latticed facade made from local spruce To satisfy the client’s desire for a private outdoor space, Innauer-Matt Architekten added covered terraces that wrap around the home, a feature the architects call the “outermost shell.” The light-filled living and dining area serves as the inner “shell” and is organized around a core of exposed concrete comprising the staircase, toilet, and storage room. “This way we created a wide spectrum of translucence and transparency which we gradually and individually adapted to each room, its purpose and the level of desired intimacy, preventing unwanted insights while making beautiful outlooks part of every day life and living,” wrote the architects. + Innauer-Matt Architekten Images © Adolf Bereuter

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Minimalist timber home gracefully blends into the Austrian landscape

Chile’s rustic Casa Pollo is made from recycled zinc plates and reclaimed wood

February 1, 2018 by  
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This quirky home in Chile adapts to the terrain to provide expansive views of a beautiful estuary on Chiloe Island. Ortuzar Gebauer Arquitectos wrapped Casa Pollo with reclaimed zinc plates, evoking the aesthetic of old warehouses in Chiloé. The house is composed of spacious areas that can accommodate large groups of people. These spaces are well connected with the outdoors, and a large timber deck that offers views of the canal. From the mainland, the house appears hermetic and opaque, referencing old Chiloé barns and warehouses . However the façade facing the canal is open and features large glazed surfaces. Related: Minimalist timber CML House in Chile features a unique pinwheel layout Reused native woods dominate the interior, creating a feeling of warmth and protection from the elements. The roof forms a sheltered area on the terrace to allow the occupants to fully enjoy an indoor-outdoor lifestyle. + Ortuzar Gebauer Arquitectos Via Archdaily Photos by Federico Cairoli

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Chile’s rustic Casa Pollo is made from recycled zinc plates and reclaimed wood

Worlds tallest hybrid timber building to boast Vancouvers most expensive new apartments

December 11, 2017 by  
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New details and renderings have been released of Shigeru Ban’s Terrace House , a collection of luxury homes in what will become the world’s tallest hybrid timber building. Developed by PortLiving, Terrace House will be set at the center of Coal Harbor overlooking the waterfront with condos starting at $3 million—which makes them the most expensive new apartments in the city. The 20 homes will be constructed as “individual works of art” with energy-efficient systems and wood harvested from sustainably managed forests in southeastern B.C. Modern in appearance and in the materials used, Terrace House is poised to stand out as one of the most innovative residential buildings in the world. However, the 19-story building also relates to and complements the historic site context through triangular shapes, natural materials , and terraces that echo the design of Evergreen , a decades-old neighboring building. Landscape architect Cornelia Oberlander, who had also worked on the planting design of the Evergreen building, was hired to work on Terrace House for continuity. “Terrace House has been thoughtfully executed and planned, drawing on Shigeru Ban’s iconic design codes to ensure that each of the 20 homes are individual works of art,” said Macario (Tobi) Reyes, founder and CEO of PortLiving . “The residences each have a full suite of smart home technologies, museum-quality glazing that helps to control temperature and provides UV protection for art collections, and fully-integrated air conditioning and heating systems paired with in-floor radiant heating and cooling that extend onto enclosed balconies, creating comfort and maximizing use of indoor/outdoor living spaces all year-round.” Related: Shigeru Ban Architects unveil plans for the world’s tallest hybrid timber building Each home in the Terrace House will be optimized for views of the city, mountains, and inlet and open up to terraces through electronic-controlled glass-sliding panels. Custom fixtures and features designed by Shigeru Ban will be installed through the building. Smart home controls are equipped in every home as are 27-foot-tall ceilings, as well as in-floor radiant heating and cooling. Almost half of the units will take up entire floor plates, while others will be split over multiple levels. + Shigeru Ban Architects Via ArchDaily

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Worlds tallest hybrid timber building to boast Vancouvers most expensive new apartments

Delightful treehouse residence weaves through a forest in Thailand

July 26, 2017 by  
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A family in Thailand planted a small forest in their backyard and built their home to adapt to the trees without disturbing them. Studio Miti designed the Forest House as a cluster of four structures interconnected with wooden terraces and walkways , for the ultimate fantasy treetop dream home. Architect’s measured the space between the trees to determine how large the home could be. In order to provide enough living spaces, the home had to be divided into multiple volumes. The house brings together architecture and nature by creating a balance between the two. The main idea was to build around existing trees and offer different views of the lush surroundings. Related: Thai eco-resort delights guests with woven pods and other sublime dwellings The new structures were placed on a cross-shaped layout and include a terrace , hallway, living area, bedroom and bathroom. All were made using l ocal building techniques to have the least impact possible on the environment. + Studio Miti Via Archdaily Photos by art4d magazine / Ketsiree Wongwan

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Delightful treehouse residence weaves through a forest in Thailand

Ship-like Hidden Pavilion uses the surrounding forest like a protective envelope

February 15, 2017 by  
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This ship-like pavilion in Spain reconciles the openness of glass architecture and the need for privacy. Penelas Architects designed the Hidden Pavilion as a quiet retreat that protects its occupants not through the use of curtains or blinds, but by treating the surrounding forest as a kind of natural envelope. The pavilion is nestled in a forest glade just northwest of Madrid, Spain . Its isolated location allowed the architects to completely open up the building toward the surroundings and draw maximum natural light into its interior. Designed to become one with nature, the building incorporates an existing 200-year-old oak tree, along with younger trees, to grow through gaps in its terraced areas. Related: Kengo Kuma unveils “blossoming” glass and timber villas for Bali With a floor space of 753 square feet spread over two floors, the pavilion includes a veranda and a rooftop terrace that overlook the surrounding forest. Natural materials , steel and glass are combined to create a kind of industrial appearance of an ocean liner that, instead of oceans, navigates the lush landscapes of central Spain. + Penelas Architects Via New Atlas Photos by Miguel de Guzmán + Rocio Romero

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Ship-like Hidden Pavilion uses the surrounding forest like a protective envelope

Estrade Residence adapts to rocky hillside with locally-harvested materials

January 30, 2017 by  
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The gorgeous Estrade Residence adapts to the rocky, steep topography of a lake shore in Quebec , and offers breathtaking views of the surroundings. Canadian design studio MU Architecture design the house using natural and locally sourced materials and created a multitude of spaces and terraces that embrace the site. The main idea was to highlight the peculiarities of the site and integrate nature into the design of the house. This resulted in a staggered structure that includes several terraces that establish a strong dialogue with the surrounding landscape. Thick walls made from rocks extracted during excavation create a spine of the project that extends outwards, protect the apartments on the ground floor, and help establish a direct connection between the interior and exterior spaces. Related: Modern meets rustic in the Hemmingford House built from natural materials The different volumes are gradually revealed as visitors climb an aerial and magisterial staircase which connects all levels of the house. Open spaces dominate the ground floor bathed in natural light, with a double-sided fireplace located in the center of the common room adding warmth to the place. This area extends the kitchen to the outside via a veranda which stretches perpendicularly to the natural ridge. Natural cedar cladding of the upper volumes complements the stone walls and gives the residence both a rustic and modern feel. + MU Architecture Via v2com Photos by Ulysse Lemerise Bouchard (YUL Photo)

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This humble home in South Korea features an observation tower for amazing views

December 29, 2016 by  
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Imagine buying a plot of land with a stellar view for your future home, only to see the construction of multi-family developments on the neighboring sites, threatening to block out the dreamy scenery. That’s exactly what happened to ON Architecture ’s client near Gimhae, South Korea. In order to preserve scenic views of the nearby city, while fulfilling the client’s desire to have a small home, the architects devised Tower House, a unique modern structure with an unexpected vertical element in the form of a raised gallery. From there, the homeowner can soak up the precious view, unscathed by nearby developments. Tower House was designed by ON Architecture and built in 2015. The home sits just outside the city of Gimhae in South Korea ’s South Gyeongsang Province, in the southeastern corner of the country’s main island. Designing a small house that could compete with neighboring multi-family dwellings was a challenge, but the architects carefully crafted a plan that would give their client everything they wanted, and possibly more. Related: Parametrically designed Louverwall house maximizes winter sunlight To provide a place for cityscape-gazing, the architects devised an observation tower that would hold the home’s living room. Additionally, a connected foyer serves as a vertical gallery where the homeowner can display their ornamental rock collection and potted plants. The resulting foyer is the centerpoint of movement inside the house, linking all the individual rooms. ON Architecture’s client requested a small house, despite the spacious plot of land they had to work with. In response, the architects created a corresponding outdoor space for each room of the house, thereby stretching the usable area and facilitating a kind of communication between the indoors and the outside world. To achieve this goal, the home’s overall footprint was designed in an X configuration, maximizing the opportunity for “in-between spaces” outdoors that can be used independently. The positioning of the rooms within the house puts the living room and master bedroom on the south-facing wall, ensuring those spaces would be flooded with natural light during the day. Tower House also features a terrace, in front of the living room, inspired by Numaru, a Korean traditional loft floor structure. + ON Architecture Via Architizer Images via ON Architecture

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This humble home in South Korea features an observation tower for amazing views

Georgetown Universitys LEED Gold living room will make you wish you were a student

December 5, 2016 by  
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Georgetown University recently added a LEED Gold “living room” for undergraduates that’s so beautiful it’ll make you wish you were a student again—at least one who can afford the posh Washington, D.C. private school. Designed by ikon.5 architects , the Healey Family Student Center is an activity hub filled with cozy study rooms, meeting spaces, cafes, and other programmatic spaces. Renovated from a former mid-century residence hall, the multipurpose adaptive reuse building is filled with natural light, living green walls, and other sustainable and energy efficient systems. The 45,000-square-foot Healey Family Student Center is a renovation and expansion of the former New South Residence Hall into a living room for undergraduates. The interior spaces are carved out of interior and exterior stone edifices in a nod to the university’s official cheer “Hoya Saxa,” a phrase that roughly translates into “what rocks.” The most eye-catching area is the “Great Room,” a large rectangular student lounge centered on a cylindrical hearth with a variety of seating options naturally illuminated from above and backed by living green walls . Full-height windows and glazed doors extend the Great Room’s footprint to the outdoors, where the landscaped Riverside Terrace overlooks the Potomac River. Related: Schmidt Hammer Lassen’s university center is inspired by local mountains in Wenzhou, China In addition to the Great Room’s open-plan lounge and the twelve adjacent study alcoves, the student center includes a smoothie cafe, TV lounge, meeting rooms, art gallery, music practice rooms, stage, pub, dance studios, and even a dividable 350-seat ballroom. A natural materials palette of timber and stone is used throughout the interior. The Healey Family Student Center achieved LEED Gold certification this year thanks to eco-friendly features including recycled materials , certified timber, and systems for optimizing energy performance. + ikon.5 architects Via ArchDaily Images by Brad Feinknopf Photographer

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Georgetown Universitys LEED Gold living room will make you wish you were a student

Fast-Growing Bamboo Clads Kengo Kuma’s Tranquil Garden Terrace Miyazaki Hotel

May 20, 2013 by  
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Read the rest of Fast-Growing Bamboo Clads Kengo Kuma’s Tranquil Garden Terrace Miyazaki Hotel Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bamboo cladding , eco design , Garden Terrace Miyazaki Hotel , green design , green hotels in Japan , green materials , green wedding chapel in Japan , japanese architecture , Japanese design , Kengo Kuma , sustainable design , Sustainable Materials        

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