Frida Escobedos 2018 Serpentine Pavilion unveiled in London

June 14, 2018 by  
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Mexican architect Frida Escobedo has unveiled this year’s Serpentine Pavilion —a dark and porous envelope that wraps around an inner courtyard with a shallow pool of water. Located on the lawn of the Serpentine Gallery in London’s Kensington Gardens, the temporary summer pavilion is built with walls of concrete roofing tiles stacked together in a staggered formation on steel poles. The open voids in the stacked tile walls give Escobedo’s pavilion a sense of lightness by allowing natural light and views to pass through. At 38, Escobedo is the youngest architect ever tapped for the design of the annual Serpentine Pavilion. She is also the first solo woman selected for the commission since Zaha Hadid , who designed the first pavilion in 2000. For the 2018 Serpentine Pavilion, now in its 18th iteration, Escobedo took inspiration from domestic Mexican architecture and British materials. An enclosed courtyard —a common feature in Mexican houses—forms the heart of the pavilion, which comprises two rectangular volumes set on a north axis in a nod to the Prime Meridian, a global standard for time and geographic distance. In contrast, the outer walls of the pavilion are aligned with the Serpentine Gallery’s east facade. Escobedo designed lattice-like walls of British-made cement roof tiles that take inspiration from Mexico’s traditional breeze walls, known as celosia. The mirrored underside of the canopy and the triangular pool on the ground reflect the movement of light and shadow to heighten visitors’ awareness of their surroundings. Related: Diébédo Francis Kéré’s rainwater-harvesting 2017 Serpentine Pavilion unveiled in London today “My design for the Serpentine Pavilion 2018 is a meeting of material and historical inspirations inseparable from the city of London itself and an idea which has been central to our practice from the beginning: the express of time in architecture through inventive use of everyday materials and simple forms,” Escobedo said. “For the Pavilion, we have added the materials of light and shadow, reflection and refraction, turning the building into a timepiece that charts the passage of the day.” The Serpentine Pavilion opens June 15 and will run until October 7, 2018. + Frida Escobedo Photography © 2018 Iwan Baan

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Frida Escobedos 2018 Serpentine Pavilion unveiled in London

Stunning temporary beach pavilion rises in Lebanon’s Tyre Coast Nature Reserve

March 20, 2018 by  
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Wood, metal ties and rope come together in this temporary space in Lebanon, forming a lightweight structure designed to raise awareness of the area’s rich marine biodiversity. The Tyre Nature Reserve Hub, named MARAH, was designed by Architecture students from the American University of Beirut , who used the project as an experiment in building lightweight and temporary systems, as well as creating spaces that have a large social and programmatic impact. Some of Lebanon ’s longest sandy beaches are located in the Tyre region–also a popular nesting site for the endangered Loggerhead and Green Sea Turtles, as well as the home of several species of local wildlife, such as the Arabian spiny mouse and the Red fox. Phoenician springs and freshwater estuaries dominate the Ras el Ain area which facilities a diversity of marine life and a large part of this region has been turned into a protected area. Despite this, the Tyre region has seen severe destruction and devastation, which acted as impetus for creating a temporary pavilion that would help spread awareness of the importance of conserving marine biodiversity . Related: Floating timber pavilion transforms a Swiss lake into an exciting new public square Architecture AUB students from the DI-LAB (Design Impact Laboratory) teamed up with environmental consultants and the Tyre Coast Nature Reserve to introduce a structure that acts as a hub for the Tyre Coast Nature Reserve. The center is located directly on the beach, where it acts as a meeting point, an information point, a presentation pavilion, an exhibition space, and a training center, among other things. The pavilion was built using wood, metal ties and ropes and addresses the idea of creating a space that simultaneously generates a large social impact and minimal site impact. + Di-Lab – American University of Beirut Via Archdaily Photos by Lorenzo Tugnoli

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Stunning temporary beach pavilion rises in Lebanon’s Tyre Coast Nature Reserve

Colorful bamboo pavilion champions sustainable design in Kuala Lumpur

February 28, 2018 by  
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Renewable and fast-growing bamboo is catching on in the world of construction. To spur on the green material’s popularity, architect Eleena Jamil designed and built Urban Brains, a temporary pavilion that shows off the versatility of bamboo from structural support to decorative cladding. Built for the World Urban Forum 2018 in collaboration with UNHabitat, the pop-up pavilion in Kuala Lumpur also encourages visitors to add their thoughts to the design by literally writing on the walls. Located on an open square next to Klang River, Urban Brains provided tranquil respite during the weeklong World Urban Forum 2018 that concluded February 13, 2018. The simple 16-square-meter pavilion is a four-wall structure covered in by 100-millimeter-long bamboo cross-sections. Some of the circular rings were filled in with colorful semi-translucent panels to evoke the effect of stained glass windows while other bamboo rings were left hollow. The colored panels are also a nod to the colors of the UN sustainable design goals. Related: This breezy bamboo amphitheater pops up in just 25 days Custom-designed stools made from short bamboo poles tied together with rattan were placed inside the pavilion in a square courtyard -like space. The roof, built with concentric square bamboo shapes, is fitted with transparent plastic and a large opening in the center to let in natural light. Visitors are encouraged to add their thoughts and ideas for improving the city by writing them down on the circular colored panels punctuating the pavilion walls. + Eleena Jamil Images via Eleena Jamil

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Colorful bamboo pavilion champions sustainable design in Kuala Lumpur

Spectacular origami pavilion made of recycled plastic pops up in Columbus, Indiana

October 18, 2017 by  
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This gorgeous origami-inspired building in Columbus, Indiana is made entirely from recycled plastic – and it lights up at night with a beautiful LED display. Students at the IU School of Art, Architecture + Design in Bloomington , led by Professor Jiangmei Wu , designed the Synergia pavilion as an experiment in building complex structures inspired by biological forms, soap bubbles, and crystal patterns. The temporary pavilion sits on the site of Eero Saarinen’s North Christian Church in Columbus, and it references the famous architect’s mid-century modernist architecture. Its design stems from a single element– a bisymmetric polyhedron tessellated into interlocking layers. Over 500 polyhedrons, measuring about two to three feet each, work together to form the elongated hexagonal shape. Related: The Folkets House is an inclusive space where refugees can learn skills and find jobs Translucent corrugated plastic sheets made from recycled plastic were laser cut at Noblitt Fabricating in Columbus Indiana and then hand folded like origami to form each of the structural units. The plastic corrugated boards are extremely lightweight and can be easily bent along the flutes. When connected together, the folded hinges produce an interlocking self-supporting lattice that is light and yet structurally efficient. This eliminates the need for additional framing and assemblage and reduces waste. + IU School of Art, Architectuare + Design Photos by Tony Vasquez

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Spectacular origami pavilion made of recycled plastic pops up in Columbus, Indiana

Bloomberg gives $64 million to anti-coal campaign

October 18, 2017 by  
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The Donald Trump administration has made a lot of noise about bringing back coal . But with renewable energy soaring , and coal plants retiring, their efforts may go in vain – and a new $64 million donation from Bloomberg Philanthropies could facilitate progress towards cleaner sources of power. Michael Bloomberg , former New York City mayor and philanthropist, said, “The Trump administration has yet to realize that the war on coal was never led by Washington – and Washington cannot end it.” The Trump administration has decried the so-called war on coal. Maybe they didn’t realize pollution from coal-fired power plants used to kill around 13,000 people every year. 7,500 Americans still die from the pollution yearly, but the number is down since the Sierra Club ramped up their Beyond Coal campaign in 2011. Bloomberg’s $64 million will go to that campaign. Related: Renewables keep booming despite Trump administration’s attempts to axe Obama’s Clean Power Plan Bloomberg said the war on coal “was started and continues to be led by communities in both red and blue states who are tired to having their air and water poisoned when there are cleaner and cheaper alternatives available.” Since 2011, 259 coal-fired stations, almost 50 percent of America’s coal plants, have shut down. Beyond Coal aims to replace coal with solar , wind , or geothermal energy. Reuters said coal exports have increased this year, pointing to information from the Energy Information Administration, which said United States coal exports from January to July went up 62 percent, compared against the same time period in 2016. But coal-fired plants keep shuttering. Since Trump entered office, according to Reuters, 10 plants have announced closures, and just last week an energy company said they’ll be shutting down a Texas plant next year. Bloomberg has given over $100 million in total to the Beyond Coal campaign; their original grants helped the effort grow from 15 states to 45. + Beyond Coal Via Bloomberg Philanthropies and Reuters Images via Pixabay and Bloomberg.org on Twitter

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Bloomberg gives $64 million to anti-coal campaign

Plastic waste pop-up pavilion rethinks recycling in the Netherlands

May 25, 2017 by  
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Plastic waste takes on new life in the PET Pavilion, a temporary structure that popped up in a public park in Enschede, The Netherlands. Project.DWG and LOOS.FM designed the 227-square-meter ephemeral pavilion to spark dialogue on topics relating to recycling and sustainable building. The experimental pavilion serves as an educational gathering space and can be easily dismantled for relocation within a day. The pavilion bears draws inspiration from Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House with its steel framework and floor-to-ceiling transparent walls. Over 40,000 plastic bottles are sandwiched between the pavilion’s double-walled transparent corrugated sheets, creating a curtain of crumpled bottles that turn the pavilion into an “abstract lantern” at night. The elevated pavilion also includes a staircase and ramp covered with 25,000 bottle caps and a divider wall filled with 8,000 body wash containers. “It is really confronting when you encounter the huge piles of waste up close,” write the designers. “That’s something we wanted to work with. ‘Something’ became a pavilion with monumental walls of pet bottles. Dismountable and temporary, with the plot in loan. With a temporary structure you bypass complicated regulation. Society is changing. To build for eternity, is an empty claim. Temporality means freedom.” Related: Dissolvable bioplastic bags from Bali are safe enough to drink The PET pavilion is currently located in a temporary park on the grounds of the former Robson pajamas in Enschede. The building is used to host events, from talks to galleries, and also includes a bar and winter garden. The pavilion will be moved to an as yet undetermined site at the end of 2017. + Project.DWG + LOOS.FM Images via Project.DWG , art by Martin Oostenrijk, Jelle de Graaf, and André Boone

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Plastic waste pop-up pavilion rethinks recycling in the Netherlands

Inflatable Second Dome transforms from small bubble to huge event venue in minutes

October 19, 2016 by  
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Photo by Iwan Baan The Second Dome was commissioned by creative workspace provider Second Home as a space where families of East London can gather and attend film screenings, design workshops and other community activities. The Second Dome can be quickly installed to accommodate different activities and span large areas. With a thickness of less than a millimeter, the pneumatic structure responds to wind and pressure and requires little energy for fabrication or assembly. Related: Tent Made From Inflated Airbags is a Prefab Pneumatic Gallery Founders Forum 2016, a community organization for global entrepreneurs , also commissioned the Second Dome for a series of events centered around innovation and design, with speakers David Adjaye and iPod co-creator and Nest founder Tony Fadell. + DOSIS Via Archdaily

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Inflatable Second Dome transforms from small bubble to huge event venue in minutes

Studio Mumbai completes handmade pavilion crafted from seven kilometers of bamboo

October 4, 2016 by  
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When we first reported on the 2016 MPavilion , organizers hoped the structure would be Australia’s largest bamboo structure, but whether or not that goal has been achieved is yet to be confirmed. Architect Bijoy Jain originally planned to build the roof and awning with karvi panels, made from a mix of cow dung and earth, however the material proved unsuitable for Melbourne’s climate. Despite the setback, the MPavilion 2016 is an impressive example of handmade architecture constructed from handcrafted Indian techniques and materials. Seven kilometers of bamboo, 50 tons of stone, and 26 kilometers of rope sourced from India and Australia were used to make the 16.8-square-meter summer pavilion. Instead of Karvi panels, the roof is built using sticks from the Karvi plant woven together by craftspeople in India over four months. Related: Handmade MPavilion will be the largest bamboo structure ever built in Australia “MPavilion is a space for the people of Melbourne to gather, talk, think and to reflect,” said Jain. “My objective has not just been to create a new building, but to capture the spirit of the place by choosing the right materials, respecting the surrounding nature and working collaboratively with local craftspeople to share design and construction ideas.” An opening at the center of MPavilion’s roof brings additional light to the space, while a golden well below collects rainwater . An elaborate ‘tazia’ entrance tower, seen in Indian ceremonies, sits adjacent. The pavilion will host a light and music show activated at dusk every night. The annual MPavilion is in its third iteration and was initiated and commissioned by the Naomi Milgrom Foundation with support from the City of Melbourne and the Victorian State Government. After this year’s MPavilion season is over, the structure will be moved to a new permanent location in Melbourne. + Studio Mumbai + MPavilion Images by John Gollings

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Studio Mumbai completes handmade pavilion crafted from seven kilometers of bamboo

Temporary pavilion by Frank Havermans references traditional Dutch farmhouses

September 22, 2016 by  
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Overlooking a newly built channel in The Netherlands, the pavilion stands out from the tranquil, pastoral surroundings as a rib cage-like structure with sharp angles. It combines corrugated steel , plywood and plastic that make up its shell, roof and siding, referencing traditional wooden-truss frames and gabled roofs of the old local residences. Related: Floating timber pavilion transforms a Swiss lake into an exciting new public square “By charging this construction with several elements from classic farmhouse typology in combination with simple low budget materials I created an experimental hybrid construction,” said Havermans. “This pavilion references the architectural heritage and also has a futuristic appearance in the landscape,” he added. Related: Dutch studios RAAAF and Studio Frank Havermans build ominous futuristic mobile shelter in the name of peace The platform is made from rough-sawn douglas wood boards, while the corrugated metal frames and plastic wrap around the base and shelter a seating structure. Another bench is formed along the exterior of the pavilion. The architect coated the plywood trusses with black rubber to protect it from the elements. + Frank Havermans + Stichting Fabrikaat Via Dezeen Photos by René de Wit

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Temporary pavilion by Frank Havermans references traditional Dutch farmhouses

Vo Trong Nghia builds a lush rooftop pavilion with nothing but bamboo and rope

November 9, 2015 by  
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