First ceramic geodesic dome in the world is affordable

January 26, 2022 by  
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Geoship installed its first bio-ceramic geodesic dome in a bid to create long-lasting, zero-carbon , fireproof and biologically resonant architecture for a new way of building homes. The company is relatively young, with just 400 paid deposits for homes, but they work by a co-op model and have over 2,000 investors. “Homebuilding is a massive, multi-trillion dollar industry that is unsustainable,” the designers said in a press release. “The Geoship micro-factory and village building platform is a new model for the regenerative future.” Related: Are these zero-carbon domes the future of sustainable housing? The idea is to create more than a new home design , but a new way of creating communities to build homes. Morgan Bierschenk, co-founder and CEO of Geoship, said this all started with community. “My brother and I started building a home for our family,” he said. “We did it on a shoestring budget, with reclaimed materials and lumber we milled on the land. Then we started questioning why — with all of our technology — are we still building with sticks and nails? How does nature build protective shells? Why does it feel so good to step outside the boxes we live in? We started engineering a new kind of home.” To build a bio-ceramic dome, Geoship mixes a type of ceramic crystals and forms them into triangular molds. The pieces are then assembled into a geodesic dome like any other construction material. The carbon used to create the triangular components is far less than traditional sandstone, passive solar or highly efficient house building materials. Plus, the operational energy use is markedly lower as well. The panels are installed on a network of struts that support the dome structure, almost like the interior structure of a mushroom cap. The end product is recyclable , mold-proof, fire-proof and flood-proof. The domes are also hurricane, earthquake and insect resistant. It even comes in cool colors. The next round of funding will be used to build out Geoship’s pilot production, micro-factory and village design platforms. That’s because Geoship is really a materials science company. Bioceramics are a new kind of material designed to create multi-century structures. The materials products used in the builds needs certification, and the pilot program still has to be built out. Their goal is to build “living environments that resonate with nature and catalyze the evolution of consciousness.” + Geoship Images via Geoship

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First ceramic geodesic dome in the world is affordable

Brazilian Pavilion at The World Expo transports visitors into nature

January 26, 2022 by  
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The immersive displays at The World Expo Dubai speak to technology, innovation, nature and the environment . Thanks to Cactus, an innovative award-winning design studio, the Brazilian Pavilion stands as an example of these water-cooler topics.  The exhibit aims to transport visitors into scenes of Brazil through the use of larger-than-life visual projections. Encompassing 24,800 square feet of space, the enclosure is covered in a custom-designed, 1002 HT projectable fabric built to withstand the extremes of the Dubai desert. Related: Innovative i-Mesh fabric takes shape at Expo 2020 Dubai The Brazilian Pavilion’s high-tensile strength keeps visitors protected and comfortable, even in the face of sandstorms, windstorms and extreme desert heat. On the other hand, it’s translucent enough to project images inside and outside the enclosure.  The nature of the fabric acts as a projection screen for 60,000 square feet of wall, floor and ceiling to be covered in illustrations of the Brazilian landscape. Guests are immersed into a sensory experience combined of technology and design that celebrates the culture and beauty of Brazil. The digital reproduction of rainforests, cities, canyons, animals , beaches and lush hillsides aims to remove the visitor from the desert and engage them in locations over 7,300 miles away.  The experience requires no transport emissions from travel, wait lines at the airport or pollution from tourists in sensitive areas of Brazil. Instead, it relies on more than 140 projectors to spin up the fully immersive 360 degree environment in a thought-provoking installation that’s both futuristic in design and current in content. The exhibit is open now until the close of The World Expo on March 31, 2022.  “We want the world to see and feel the beauty and intricacies of the country we call home,” explained Marcelo Pontes, head of architecture for Cactus. “The process of achieving seamless UX requires good design at its core. There were many technical roadblocks, including regional weather, sand and heat that made this project more difficult than anything else we have taken on before. Unlike traditional immersive experiences, which only focus on projection mapping inside spaces, we were designing for the entire exterior of the exhibit as well.” + Cactus Photography by Joana Franca and Leonardo Finotti

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Brazilian Pavilion at The World Expo transports visitors into nature

How using 3D-printed foam can cut down concrete waste

January 25, 2022 by  
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The construction industry is highly unsustainable. In fact, 7% of global CO2 emissions result from cement production alone. In an effort to cut down construction-related carbon emissions, researchers in the Digital Building Technologies (DBT) department at ETH Zürich have created FoamWork. The project examines how foam 3D printing (F3DP) can be used in conjunction with concrete casting. The outcome is a less labor-intensive system that enhances material efficiency and lowers carbon emissions. Currently, cast-concrete structural elements use excessive material. Occasionally, engineers use hollow plastic forms to reduce concrete in standard slabs. For more complex systems, casting molds are made from timber or CNC-carved dense plastic foam. These labor-intensive systems overuse concrete or produce excessive waste from off-cuts. Conversely, using F3DP shapes within cast concrete formwork can save up to 70% of concrete, are significantly lighter and well-insulated. Related: New eco-friendly, decomposing construction foam unveiled A slab prototype by the DBT team shows how versatile it is to combine concrete structures and 3D-printed foam . The slab uses ribs derived from isostatic lines, which indicate the directions of compression and tension. Based on the principal stress pattern, the geometry of this slab has 24 cavities for foam inserts of 12 different shapes. For the foam production, ETH Zürich has collaborated with FenX AG, a company that uses mineral waste to produce high-performance building insulation. A robotic arm fabricates the foam components using recycled fly ash, the waste from coal-fired power stations. The foam components are arranged in timber formwork before poured in ultra-high-performance fiber-reinforced concrete (UHPFRC) to cast the structural element. Once the concrete cures, the foam pieces can either be left in for their insulative properties, or the raw material can be recycled and reprinted for other FoamWork projects. This process can be replicated for other standardized or more intricate concrete structural elements. Calculating the principal stress patterns can be used to design and fabricate various material-efficient structural elements. These can range from standardized elements to customized slabs and walls. Since there are no off-cuts created in using FoamWork, the whole fabrication system has the potential to be zero-waste . Alongside minimizing material waste, the lighter masses of the structural elements allow for easy transportation, handling and assembly on construction sites. + Digital Building Technologies, ETH Zürich Photography by Patrick Bedarf

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How using 3D-printed foam can cut down concrete waste

Passive design helps Lucio building regulate its temperature

January 17, 2022 by  
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The architectural design of the Lucio office building in Lille, France , integrates with the sun for variable lighting and temperature control in a smart passive design. Developed by Barbarito Bancel architects for client Foncière de L’Érable, the new building sits in a developing area along the banks of the Deûle. The location rests within EuraTechnologies, an economic hub for information and communication technology . Startups from around the world are located here, creating a community of research and development laboratories, corporate buildings, schools and more.  Related: One of the largest CLT construction in the US is in Oregon Optimally situating the building took precedence, and the result is a complex that opens into the Cour de Bretagne plaza. Lucio faces the main building of the new development called Le Blan-Lafont, which features a bell tower and represents the region’s historical thread mills.  The Lucio interior office spaces have a modular design, possible because of the completely open floor plan void of vertical columns. However, the real architectural action takes place in the four facades of the building that are exposed to the sun most of the day. This  passive design  not only creates a welcoming workplace but lowers energy consumption through natural lighting within the compact and efficiently-built space.  Lighting and temperature throughout the space are controlled via glass and aluminum louvers that drape the entire facade. The technology allows the outer shell to open and close in response to the weather, providing more or less natural light as needed. The system ensures  energy efficiency  by providing solar heat when it’s cold and protecting against solar heat when it’s hot. The windows also offer extensive and impressive views of the surrounding public areas.  The lightly-colored exterior materials for the building stand in contrast to the surrounding  brick  buildings. Inside, the layout optimizes light, energy and temperature control by using prestressed, lightened concrete slabs. An ultra-efficient HVAC system balances out the cooling needs.  + Barbarito Bancel Via v2com , Archivibe Images via Alessandra Chemollo

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Passive design helps Lucio building regulate its temperature

Nokia Arena has touchless digital keys with mobile access

January 14, 2022 by  
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The new Nokia Arena in Finland just opened its doors last month, but only to those with special digital keys. The entire arena, designed by Polish Architect Daniel Libeskind, is wired with touchless digital access technology that make innovative use of new artificial intelligence security. Nokia Arena will host the 2022 Men’s Ice Hockey World Championships and other large events. Its round-the-clock opening hours are the perfect opportunity to test a new access management technology . Related: Nokia Working With UK Scientists to Charge Cell Phones With Lightning! The designers knew they needed not only a great arena , but one that made it possible to distinguish between people who needed employee access, hotel guest access or access to semi-public spaces. They brought in Abloy, an access management and control system company that created a unique touchless locking system for the arena. This is not only useful and efficient for a complex project, but follows a trend in healthier design in light of the COVID-19 pandemic and other pathogens that can spread at large venues. Abloy has also secured other large arenas, including Helsinki Olympic Stadium and the Warsaw National Stadium. “Nokia Arena is a striking example of security trends, where access rights are becoming digital and door environments are touchless,” said Jari Perälä, vice president, domestic sales and marketing, Abloy Oy. “In this development, various human resource, space and access management systems, for example, are integrated. They share information to improve operational efficiency and security . There has been a lot of discussion about the API economy (i.e. utilizing data shared through application programming interfaces, in recent years).” Along with electromechanical keys, Nokia Arena’s new security system allows doors to open with access rights on mobile devices or wristbands. This system allows the arena to respond to the wide array of access levels required to run the space 24/7. “We have introduced a wide range of keys,” said Jani Helenius, property and security manager at Nokia Arena. “Access permits can be sent to smart devices , in which case the door opens with the help of a mobile phone or smartwatch in the blink of an eye.” To anticipate safety in case of an emergency evacuation, the locks on the arena doors are integrated with the fire safety system. Smooth evacuation is also ensured by Abloy push bars that open the doors open quickly and easily when needed. “Simulations during the construction phase have shown that 4,500 people can be guided away from the main floor of the arena in less than eight minutes,” said Helenius. “The entire arena can be emptied in about 15 to 20 minutes, in an optimal situation. This would not be possible without effective opening mechanisms on the exit routes.” + Studio Libeskind Images via SRV / Aihio Arkkitehdit Oy and SRV/Libeskind/Tomorrow

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Urban Sequoia is a blueprint for sustainable architecture

January 13, 2022 by  
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This past fall, COP26 opened the door for discussions about many  environmental  issues. However, few presentations addressed one elephant in the room — the fact that the construction industry contributes up to 40% of ongoing carbon release. Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) used the COP26 platform to offer a sustainable architecture proposal that could reduce the impact of the built environment and implement systems that will result in a carbon-negative initiative. SOM’s prototype is a high-rise building meant to act as a model for high carbon-contributing cities. The concept takes its cues from the natural process of photosynthesis and forests sequestering and storing carbon . Urban Sequoia, as the model is called, stands to mirror these benefits by creating “forests” of buildings that could be part of a solution to the climate crisis. Related: Students design a house that revolutionizes urban design SOM’s concept isn’t delivered as a single and inflexible blueprint. Instead, the prototype incorporates a broad array of innovations and technology in a sustainable architecture design that can be built today.  With forecasts for continued urban growth,  green design  elements are more important than ever. SOM’s proposal takes action against the damaging aspects of the construction industry with buildings that not only reduce material emissions but actually absorb carbon.  Chris Cooper, SOM Partner, explained the strategy, saying, “We are quickly evolving beyond the idea of being carbon neutral. The time has passed to talk about neutrality. Our proposal for Urban Sequoia – and ultimately entire ‘forests’ of Sequoias – makes buildings, and therefore our cities, part of the solution by designing them to sequester carbon, effectively changing the course of climate change.” By transforming a building into an environmental solution, the prototype high rise can sequester as much as 1,000 tons of carbon per year, equivalent to 48,500 trees. This is achieved by streamlining materials for maximum efficiency with minimal resources and includes the use of biomaterials such as bio-bricks, hempcrete,  wood , and biocrete to replace concrete and steel. SOM’s proposal radically rethinks the traditional processes for design and construction in more ways than one. In addition to material selection, the construction blueprint incorporates carbon capture technologies, estimating it could reduce construction carbon emissions by 95%.  According to SOM, the prototype could absorb up to 400% more carbon than it would emit during construction . “This is a pathway to a more sustainable future that is accessible today. Imagine a world where a building helps to heal the planet,” said Kent Jackson, SOM Partner. “We developed our idea so that it could be applied and adapted to meet the needs of any city in the world, with the potential for positive impact at any building scale.”  In addition to the building model, SOM addresses aspects like replacing hardscaping with  plants  and even capturing carbon from streets. Collecting carbon isn’t the end of the process though. Once captured, carbon can be converted into a variety of products for roads and pipes.  “If the Urban Sequoia became the baseline for new buildings, we could realign our industry to become the driving force in the fight against climate change,” said Mina Hasman, Senior Associate Principal. “We envision a future in which the first Urban Sequoia will inspire the architecture of an entire neighborhood – feeding into the city ecosystem to capture and repurpose carbon to be used locally with surplus distributed more widely.”  + Skidmore, Owings & Merrill Images via © SOM | Miysis

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Urban Sequoia is a blueprint for sustainable architecture

Nearly all of the German Pavilion is recyclable

January 13, 2022 by  
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The exhibits at this year’s Expo 2020 Dubai (postponed to 2021 due to the pandemic), feature a range of innovative designs from around the world. Working within the theme of “Connecting Minds, Creating the Future,” the German Pavilion highlights sustainable features that cater to the desert environment .  Architects at LAVA accepted the challenge to make a temporary structure for millions of visitors that spoke to the concepts of connectivity, sustainability and local relevance. The result is a pavilion that stands as an example of creating more with less.  Related: Innovative i-Mesh fabric takes shape at Expo 2020 Dubai “The key question was how to design a temporary exhibition and event space for up to three million visitors in a desert environment that was sustainable,” said Tobias Wallisser, director of LAVA. “LAVA’s solution linked the expo theme of connectedness with our approach of ‘more with less,’ with humans interacting with nature and technology at its heart.” Using the minimum amount of material for construction was a goal from the start, so the team created a series of vertically-stacked cubes with minimal site impact that provide maximum space. The ensemble represents connectedness while serving function in providing an open space and large atrium for visitors to explore individually or as a group.   “Architecture isn’t purely a façade. Of course we wanted the building to be Instagrammable ,” said Wallisser. “But also innovative, thought-provoking, with an effective experiential quality. The hardware of the building creates a journey for visitors from around the world.” Overall, the structure mirrors the design of local courtyard houses that close the outer façade and face the activity inward. The positioning of the building’s components creates a passive design for natural airflow. However, the flexibility of the canopy roof and open-able, single-layer ETFE membrane façade results in a hybrid air conditioning system with notable energy savings. The natural shading from the hot desert sun decreases heat inside the building while simultaneously minimizing the bulk required to support the structure. The technical canopy provides filtered natural light that resembles a forest canopy. The materials are malleable to move with the wind and adapt to local changing weather conditions.  Besides minimizing the amount of materials, the team carefully selected parts that could be recycled. As a result, 95% of the pavilion will be recycled after the six-month exhibition ends in March 2022.  “An efficiently stacked volume of space, responding to the local environment with an intelligent climate management system,” said Alexander Rieck, director of LAVA. “This project shows how buildings can be optimized, made intelligent, be reconfigured and can adapt to changing users, environments, temperatures , acoustics and light.” + LAVA Photography by Andreas Keller and Taufik Kenan

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Nearly all of the German Pavilion is recyclable

This eco-resort uses an ancient process for natural cooling

January 6, 2022 by  
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Plans for the eco-resort Qanat Hotel place it on a coastal, semi-desert strip in southeast Iran. Notably, it’s located near an existing qanat, a feature that sets the foundation for the entire design of the building.  A qanat is an ancient system that uses gravity to transport water from higher ground to lower ground. In this project, it will flow beneath the hotel for natural cooling in the desert heat without the typical evaporation that occurs on the surface. Additionally, the water will act as irrigation without the need for pumps. The design also uses the  water  for interior pools and fountains.  Related: MEAN* proposes 3D-printed concrete majlis for Emirati homes Labeled an ecotourism resort, Qanat Hotel relies on wind,  solar power , and aquifers that honor traditional Persian construction while catering to a new generation of visitors. In addition to focusing on eco-friendly building practices, architect Margot Krasojevi? placed a high value on respecting the region’s cultural heritage.  The design relies on  renewable energy  to convert radiation into usable power. A large canopy is suspended above the hotel’s atrium pool. It’s flexible to move in the desert wind but stable enough to support the dual task of collecting solar power as well as condensation, which flows into the atrium pool below. The canopy also works as a shelter from the intense sun. The design reflects the marriage of traditional nomadic tents with the technology of modern semiconductors and micro conductors. Towers built from striated flexible aluminum and GFRP (glass fiber reinforced panels) collect warm air and  recycle  it through the hotel’s lower ground floor, where evaporative cooling brings it down to a comfortable temperature for guests.  The hotel rooms are partly buried in the ground to maintain cooler temperatures via the qanat below. A punctured roof allows  natural light  to filter in and provides views from the inside out. + Margot Krasojevi? Architects  Via v2com   Images via Margot Krasojevi? 

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This eco-resort uses an ancient process for natural cooling

Fish struggle with warming oceans and acidification

December 28, 2021 by  
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Fish face a new threat — ocean acidification caused by global warming. In a recent study published in  Global Change Biology , researchers found that warming waters and acidification could adversely affect how fish interact in groups.  The project leader, Professor Ivan Nagelkerken from the University of Adelaide’s Environment Institute and Southern Seas Ecology Laboratories, says that tropical species are traveling toward Earth’s poles and finding new ways of interaction. “Fish show gregarious behaviour and cluster in shoals which helps them to acquire food and for protection against predators,” said Nagelkerken. “Many gregarious tropical species are shifting poleward under current ocean warming and interacting in new ways with fish in more temperate areas.” Related: Scientists discover parasite that eats and replaces fish tongues Researchers reviewed how fish species interact and behave in changing environments. They aimed to determine how the rising concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere affects fish behavior. With CO2 already driving global temperatures high, oceans and seas have also been warming up. When the oceans warm, they also get acidified, which affects the behavior of fish and other sea creatures. “We found that tropical and temperate fish species tend to move to the right when coordinating together in a shoal especially when spooked by a predator, but this bias significantly diminished under ocean acidification,” said Angus Mitchell, a University of Adelaide Ph.D. student who was among the researchers. The study found that mixed shoals of tropical and temperate species were less cohesive under warm ocean conditions. They also showed less interest in escape, raising concerns over the coexistence of predator and prey. Professor David Booth from the University of Technology, Sydney says that these responses from fish are a result of stress from interacting with new species and having to stay in new territories. “Our findings highlight the direct effect of climate stressors on fish behaviour and the interplay with the indirect effects of new species interactions,” said Booth. According to said Nagelkerken, the survival of certain fish species is threatened under these conditions. “Strong shoal cohesion and coordinated movement affect the survival of a species: whether to acquire food or evade predators,” said Nagelkerken. “If the ability for fish to work together is detrimentally affected it could determine the survival of particular species in the oceans of the future. Tropical species may initially fare poorly when moving into new temperate areas.” Via Newswise Lead image Pixabay

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Fish struggle with warming oceans and acidification

Rainfall prediction app helps Indonesias farmers

December 27, 2021 by  
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A new rainfall app is helping  farmers  in Indonesia’s Sumbawa Island navigate climate change. A collaboration between  Bandung Institute of Technology ,  USAID’s Bureau for Humanitarian Assistance  and an international development nonprofit called  World Neighbors  is giving farmers important data on maximizing their crops. In the past, the farmers in Dompu Regency have relied on natural signs and astronomical calculations to determine the best planting times. But  climate change  is throwing off generations of traditional knowledge as weather — especially rainfall — has become less predictable. Misjudging the best planting time can lead to financial ruin. The new rainfall app, funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development, aims to help farmers determine the best time to plant. Related: Climate change is wreaking havoc on Italy’s olive harvests In  Indonesia , a regency is an administrative division within a province. Dompu Regency contains many small family farms, with corn being the major crop. The land is sloping, and the farmers use dryland farming techniques, which means cultivating crops without irrigation in places that usually get less than 20 inches of annual rainfall. Every drop is precious. Inhabitat talked to Edd Wright, World Neighbors’ regional director for Southeast Asia, about the development and uptake of the new rainfall app. Wright manages the Indonesian programs focusing on climate change adaptation and sustainable  agriculture . Inhabitat: Tell us a little bit about the individuals behind the development of this app. Wright:  Dr. Armi Susandi, MT. (born 4 September 1969) is an Indonesian scientist and lecturer. He is an expert on  weather  and climate who teaches at the Bandung Institute of Technology (ITB). Armi Susandi also serves as Chair II of the National Council on Climate Change, a state institution established based on a presidential decree with the task of coordinating policies and efforts to deal with climate change. His idea to create a climate change disaster early warning technology emerged in 2002, while studying at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Colorado, United States. Armi Susandi then earned his doctorate in climate change from the University of Hamburg, Germany in 2004. Since then, he has created several  technologies  regarding early warning of climate change disasters, such as Forest Fire Management System, Flood Early Warning and Early Action System, Dynamic Management and Information Services for Fisheries, Smart Agriculture Information System, Smart Information System for Search And Rescue, amongst others. Inhabitat: How widespread are smartphones in Dompu Regency? Do most farmers have one, or access to somebody else’s? Wright:  According to  Indonesia Baik ,  smartphone  ownership in Nusa Tenggara (the province where the regency of Dompu is) reaches 45%. Based on observations, young farmers in Dompu have smartphones, while older farmers usually do not. Farmers who do not have smartphones, they will access weather information via smartphones from the agriculture extension workers, other farmers, their children or other family members. Inhabitat: What was farmers’ initial reaction to the app, and how has that changed over time? Wright:  For farmers who have never applied  rainfall  prediction (PCH), at first they doubted PCH. Many farmers have not dared to adopt PCH because they are worried that if the prediction is wrong, in the end, the farmers themselves will suffer losses. However, after a process of sharing experiences with farmers who have implemented PCH, some of these farmers finally carried out a trial planting. When this trial turned out to be good, more and more farmers followed began to trust the tools. For farmers who have used the analogue version of PCH (printed maps), there is no difficulty for them in implementing the  digital  version of PCH (app). There are only technical issues such as availability of smartphones and poor signal quality. Inhabitat: Do you have any specific stories about how farmers altered their behavior because of info gleaned from the app? Wright:  Haji Safrudin, a farmer from Karamabura Village, Dompu Regency, used to use natural signs, namely the appearance of the peak of the tamarind  tree  to determine when the planting season arrives. “In the past we used tamarind trees as an indicator of the arrival of the rainy season,” he said. “If the shoots of the leaves appear, it is a sign that the rainy season will soon come. To predict the planting season is over, we observe the kapok tree. If the kapok starts to dry, then that is a sign not to plant again.” Since the intervention of World Neighbors, Safrudin now always checks his smartphone to see the rain prediction before  planting . Sometimes he even deliberately did it in front of other farmers, so they could see for themselves. Safrudin and his friends now no longer see the peaks of tamarind trees to start planting. But the planting time is done by looking at the PCH application on their smartphones. Inhabitat: Can you describe a typical training session — where are they held, how many people attend, who are the presenters, what transpires? Wright:  Local  government  and community buy-in begins during the initial building of the tools, a process that relies on data collection on historical rainfall patterns, past hydrometeorological disasters, annual yields from multiple sources, including the Agriculture Agency and individual village governments. Based on previous experience, by the time the tools have been created and are ready for dissemination, the Agriculture Field Extension Agency will be fully on-board. Regency-level workshops involving all related government agencies are then held. These workshops introduce the tools to regency level authorities and are followed with a full training program that includes a training of trainers (ToT) targeting extension workers and local NGO partners, carried out by Bandung Institute of Technology and World Neighbors. This training covers climate change and its impact on agriculture; the importance of weather predictions in the context of climate change; understanding the modelling results; features of the climate-smart agriculture digital tools; strategies for sharing the data with farmers and  community  organizing; and preparation of follow-up plans. When extension  workers  are fully conversant in the tools, World Neighbors staff accompany them to socialize the new knowledge and skills to farmer groups. This happens in three stages. The first stage is to create a dialogue with village leaders on how their traditional knowledge and local wisdom is used in determining the start of the wet season and planting times; discussion on its suitability with the current real conditions they experience, and to then introduce them to new methods of rainfall prediction. Through this dialogue, the strengths of local wisdom and the new technologies are combined and accepted, rather than being viewed as in competition. Once there is acceptance from these leaders, the second phase is to share the tools with the farmer groups. These training sessions cover  climate change , its impact on agriculture, the importance of learning new technologies as a complement to local wisdom; and sharing the monthly rainfall prediction modeling results for the next 12 months. By the end of the training, agreements are made with the farmers who decide to commit to applying the recommendations from the modelling tools. After this initial training, the third stage is to assist these farmers in their application; continue to convince those who are still hesitant; and monitor the planting times and types of plants planted; record crop yields and compare results between adopters and non-adopters. Inhabitat: Do you plan to expand this app program to other parts of Indonesia, or for other countries in which you work? Wright:  Currently this app program is implemented in five regencies of Indonesia – Dompu, Central Lombok, East Lombok, West Lombok and Nagekeo. If  funding  allows, we plan to extend it to another four regencies in eastern Indonesia. + Edd Wright, World Neighbors Images via World Neighbors

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Rainfall prediction app helps Indonesias farmers

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