Schemata Architects weaves modern design into a traditional Japanese house

July 5, 2018 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Schemata Architects weaves modern design into a traditional Japanese house

Tokyo-based  Schemata Architects have renovated a traditional Japanese residence into a modern dwelling with an office, while keeping many of the 80-year-old building’s original features intact. Located in the seaside city of Kamakura an hour south of Tokyo , the Hojo Sanci is set in a quiet and lush residential area. To minimize changes to the original building structure and retain an open feel, the architects used varying floor heights and finishes to differentiate the programmatic areas. Built primarily from wood, the two-story Japanese home — which comprises a beautiful onsite garden and verdant greenery beyond — dates back to the early 20th century. Schemata Architects oriented the home’s rooms outward to keep the original emphasis on the outdoors. However, they removed the fusuma (wood-framed paper sliding doors) that had divided the rooms to create one large open space. To celebrate the building’s past, the architects also preserved existing finishes and partially exposed the substructure by removing sections of the ceiling and walls. Tatami mats were also laid down in certain rooms, where the floor was elevated above ground by 60 centimeters. “We decided to focus on floor heights and finishes and treat them as means to express different spatial characters and define spatial/functional zones,” explained Jo Nagasaka, the founder of Schemata Architects. “Firstly, we set a tatami floor area raised 40 cm above the earth floor at the entrance as a reference plane and determined the height, dimension and finish of respective floors in other areas. Each room was distinguished from others by different characteristics of furniture placed there. The floor height differences create a vibrant feeling as well as different viewpoints, allowing one to constantly feel nature and creative energy at any place and anytime in this space.” Related: Century-old Japanese townhouse reborn as Blue Bottle Coffee’s first Kyoto location The mix of modern and traditional becomes apparent in the various room designs. On the west side of the home, the architects inserted a Japanese-style room with tatami and an engawa (a type of covered veranda ) that connects to the garden, and OSB floors and gray geometric furnishings are used in the contemporary office addition. + Schemata Architects Images via Kenta Hasegawa

See the original post:
Schemata Architects weaves modern design into a traditional Japanese house

Airbnb launches nature-filled Tokyo office that feels like a beautiful cozy home

August 17, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Airbnb launches nature-filled Tokyo office that feels like a beautiful cozy home

Located in the city’s busy Shinjuku district, Airbnb’s Tokyo office, like its other international offices, takes inspiration from real local Airbnb listings. Formerly a drab corporate environment, the newly renovated office boasts an airy and tranquil feel that was also informed by feedback and interaction with employees. “The main concept of this project was to recreate the feeling and vibe of a Tokyo neighbourhood,” said Makoto Tanijiri and Ai Yoshida of Suppose Design Office. “Instead of using simple walls, we laid out building-inspired volumes to articulate the space, dividing the various functions while keeping a continuity throughout the whole office .” Suppose Design Office collaborated with Airbnb’s in-house Environments Team to create the workspaces’ distinctly minimalist and Japanese character. Light-colored timber dominates the surfaces and live trees and foliage bring nature indoors. Staff members and visitors are immediately greeted by a double-height leafy atrium that serves as reception, but looks more like a modern cafe. The office then branches out to a variety of different rooms with diverse workspaces from communal worktables to private cubbies. Related: Airbnb’s Portland call center offers a beautiful and flexible work environment Japanese influences are most evident in the Engawa area, an elevated platform covered with tatami mats and cushions, allowing staff to sit or kneel on the ground and overlook cityscape views while working. Traditional tearooms also inspired the design for the office’s private Skype booths that are made from local white oak and rice paper film. + Suppose Design Office Via Dezeen

See the original post: 
Airbnb launches nature-filled Tokyo office that feels like a beautiful cozy home

Sustainable bioclimatic home was built using volcanic ash and prickly pear fibers

August 17, 2016 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Sustainable bioclimatic home was built using volcanic ash and prickly pear fibers

casa G-M sits on the coast of the Mediterranean Sea, and the calm natural colors of the house fit in with the seaside environment. The exterior walls are made of tufo, a local stone created when volcanic ash builds up. Cork panels provide insulation. The thick tufo walls also are covered with a “thermal coat plaster;” that’s where the prickly pear comes in. The builders blended natural fibers from prickly pear plants onsite with other local materials like clay and lime. The interior design utilizes recycled materials, and the builders did not use “chemical additives, resins, and solvents.” Related: Four generations live under an energy-efficient and bioclimatic roof in France In addition to the building materials, the layout of the house draws on bioclimatic design. 0-co2 architettura sostenibile noted wind direction and the sun’s path to consider the form and orientation of the home. Window and patio placement allow for ventilation. Wide walls enable casa G-M to take in and store thermal energy in the winter, and keep the home cool in the summer. Solar energy gathered by rooftop solar panels powers the home. There’s also a biomass boiler in the residence. Further, casa G-M is equipped with systems to recycle rainwater and greywater. casa G-M is meant to look as if it was there “all along,” and “aims to link the technological and typological characteristics of the building with the climatic characteristics of the site and the use of renewable energy resources, recovering the ancient rules of construction related to the local micro-climate and other local resources available.” + 0-co2 architettura sostenibile Via Freshome and Architizer Images courtesy of Bart Conterio

The rest is here: 
Sustainable bioclimatic home was built using volcanic ash and prickly pear fibers

Bad Behavior has blocked 1279 access attempts in the last 7 days.