This prefab floating house in Amsterdam was inspired by Japanese tatami rooms

April 2, 2018 by  
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If you’re strolling through Amsterdam and notice a houseboat with a design that doesn’t match the surrounding architecture, you’ve probably found this prefab floating house with an interior inspired by Japanese design. Architect Julius Taminiau drew inspiration from tatami rooms to create a home for himself and his family, and he introduced various space-saving features to make it comfortable and practical. The floating house was constructed in the town of Hardenberg, over 62 miles (100 kilometers) away. It was then sailed over the IJsselmeer to its final destination. “I was looking for a place where we could build a family house with a relatively small budget,” said Taminiau. “This was very difficult as housing prices are increasing very abruptly in Amsterdam, so this houseboat was a perfect match.” Related: Rusting 1950s cargo ship transformed into a stunning modern floating home Taminiau utilized a tatami grid in order to standardize the design and reduce waste. The external cladding also references tatami mats and has a reflective finish that lets it discreetly reflect the water. The house has two levels, with the lower one located partly below the water line. This level houses the master bedroom with en-suite bathroom and two smaller bedrooms. The main living areas occupy the upper floor, where the occupants can enjoy views of the surroundings. A double-height space near the main entrance functions as an office space, but can easily be converted into a guest bedroom. An open staircase leads to the rooftop deck , which is partly outfitted with solar panels. + Julius Taminiau Architects Via Dezeen

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This prefab floating house in Amsterdam was inspired by Japanese tatami rooms

Tiny tea room offers a spot of respite in a bustling Japanese subway station

February 2, 2016 by  
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Japan’s bustling cities can feel overwhelming, which is why Takahiro Fukuda Architecture designed a tiny tea room to provide a bit of quiet respite. Illuminated by LEDs, the miniature pop-up space mimics the set up a tradition tea ceremony room and fits two tatami mats measuring 1,800 millimeters by 1,800 millimeters. Designed to be placed in large subway concourses, the lightweight structure is constructed from off-shelf and reusable materials and is easy to dismantle and move. “This tiny tearoom gives us a pleasant moment of refreshing and makes us feel tranquil,” write the architects. “It enhances to rethink and ponder the reevaluation of our everyday life.” + Takahiro Fukuda Architecture The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing!

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Tiny tea room offers a spot of respite in a bustling Japanese subway station

Level Architects Hide Tokyo’s Fukusawa House Behind Black Walls and Fill it with Natural Light

April 25, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Level Architects Hide Tokyo’s Fukusawa House Behind Black Walls and Fill it with Natural Light Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 4-story urban house , built-in bench seating , built-in furniture , central skylight , Fukasawa , level architects , loft space , narrow house , open ballustrade , privacy , privacy walls , tatami mats , Tokyo , tokyo residents privacy , urban house

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Level Architects Hide Tokyo’s Fukusawa House Behind Black Walls and Fill it with Natural Light

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