Stellar views and a small footprint defines this Tasmanian timber cabin

April 12, 2018 by  
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A small abode perched high on the eastern slopes of Tasmania’s Mount Wellington offers spectacular landscape views. Room11 Architects designed the boxy dwelling with a deliberately compact footprint as an “intensely private” retreat that keeps the focus on outdoor views framed by large windows. In addition to enviable views, natural cross ventilation and a wood-burning stove help keep the home, called Little Big House, attuned to nature. Located high above Hobart, Little Big House is an escape from the city set in a forested landscape. The simple residence is clad in vertical unfinished timber in a nod to the local vernacular construction styles of Southern Tasmania. “A small home with big volumes, the house is a bespoke building in a cool climate,” wrote the architects. “Eschewing many of the traditions of Australian architecture , this house is distinctly Tasmanian.” Related: Historic train shed transformed into Tasmanian School for Architecture Polycarbonate cladding on the east and west facades bring additional light to the minimalist interior without compromising privacy. White walls and tall ceilings create a bright and airy atmosphere indoors; the entry, kitchen, and bathroom spaces are finished in black to provide visual contrast. The focus is kept on the double-height living room set next to a long strip of glazing, while the bedroom is tucked above on the mezzanine level. + Room11 Architects Via ArchDaily Images © Ben Hosking

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Stellar views and a small footprint defines this Tasmanian timber cabin

Tasmanian Devils are rapidly evolving to fight cancer

September 1, 2016 by  
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In the quest to conquer cancer , scientists have turned to the natural world for effective solutions. In this case, the details may be in the Devil. An international team of researchers has learned that two specific sections of the Tasmanian Devil genome are changing rapidly in response to the spread of devil facial tumor disease (DFTD). The genetic data compiled by the researchers will be used to help protect the Tasmanian Devil from extinction while providing insight into treatment for humans. “Our study suggests hope for the survival of the Tasmanian devil in the face of this devastating disease ,” said researcher Andrew Storfer. “Ultimately, it may also help direct future research addressing important questions about the evolution of cancer transmissibility and what causes remission and reoccurrence in cancer and other diseases.” The Tasmanian Devil is the largest carnivorous marsupial in the world and is found in the wild only on the Australian island state of Tasmania. It is named for its aggressive behavior against outsiders and fellow Devils. Through this peer-to-peer violence, DFTD may be spread. One of only three types of transmissible cancer, DFTD has wiped out nearly eighty percent of the Tasmanian Devil population in the twenty years since it was discovered. As Dr. Ian Malcolm once so eloquently put it, life finds a way  and some Devils have evolved to endure against this threat. Related: Australian state announces the country’s first permanent ban on fracking The researchers were inspired to explore genetic explanations when some individuals in disease-ravaged populations endured despite scientific models predicting their demise. “If a disease comes in and knocks out 90 percent of the individuals, you might predict the 10 percent who survive are somehow genetically different,” said study co-author Paul Hohenlohe. “What we were looking for were the parts of the genome that show that difference.” The team discovered that two specific genomic regions, which contained genes that are connected to the immune system  and cancer, demonstrated significant changes in the surviving populations. In addition to identifying the specific function for these genes, the researchers hope to use this information to increase genetic diversity and resilience within the Tasmanian Devil population. Via Phys.org Images via Chen Wu/Flickr  and  Greg Schechter/Flickr  

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Tasmanian Devils are rapidly evolving to fight cancer

Origin of Tasmanian Devil Cancer Uncovered

January 28, 2010 by  
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Male Tasmanian Devil A relatively rare form of transmissible cancer–known as Devil Facial Tumor Disease (DFTD)–has been decimating Tasmanian Devil ( Sarcophilus harisii ) populations in Northeast Tasmania over the past 23 or more years. First identified in 1996, the spread of this cancer has gotten so pervasive that the animal–the world’s largest carnivorous marsupial–has now become one more of the world’s most endangered species.

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Origin of Tasmanian Devil Cancer Uncovered

New Information on Aging

January 28, 2010 by  
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Aging is a controversial topic.  On the one hand, we hate the thought of wrinkles and age spots, not to mention disease and decline.  But, let’s face it, we all want to get older because the alternative stinks. Since hitting 40 I have tried to embrace aging.  In general, I have always been of the “You are as old as you think you are” adage, but have noticed a few, albeit subtle, changes.  My once normal skin is getting drier (as is my hair) and there is a little more sagging and a few extra fine lines.  But really, do we want to look 25 (or 30) when we are 40 and up, or do we want to look healthy for our own age

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New Information on Aging

IBM Using Two of World’s Fastest Supercomputers to Develop Lithium Air Batteries

January 28, 2010 by  
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With a theoretical storage capacity more than 10 times higher than today’s best lithium-ion batteries, it’s no wonder lithium-air batteries are being touted as one of the types of batteries that could make electric cars truly mainstream. Now, as part of a US Department of Energy program to provide large amounts of supercomputer time to advance cutting edge, real world research, IBM scientists are partnering with government scientists from both Argonne and Oak Ridge National Laboratories to model and develop the materials needed to make lithium-air batteries a reality.

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IBM Using Two of World’s Fastest Supercomputers to Develop Lithium Air Batteries

Postal Service Could Get $2 Billion To Electrify 20,000 Vehicles

January 28, 2010 by  
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The United States Postal service is the second largest civilian employer in the country, after Wal-Mart. Over 650,000 are employed by the USPS, which utilizes some 260,000 vehicles. While 43,000 of these vehicles run on E85 fuel, they still manage to get an average of just 9 mpg.

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Postal Service Could Get $2 Billion To Electrify 20,000 Vehicles

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