Human-size spider web made of tape invites visitors to crawl inside

January 25, 2018 by  
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Tape may seem like an odd art medium to some, but one exhibition is changing minds by turning people into scurrying arthropods. Visitors to the Des Moines Art Center are getting lost inside this giant human-scale spider web made out of thousands of rolls of clear packing tape. The Tape art installation was created by art collective Numen/For Use and invites visitors to explore inside of the unusual suspended labyrinth. Tape is part of the museums’ Drawing in Space exhibit, which features four artists who work with the medium of tape. Art collective, Numan/For Use, is well-known for their creative work with tape , and in this case, used over 1,000 rolls and countless man hours to construct the translucent web. Located in the museum’s upper I.M.Pei gallery, visitors can explore inside the giant maze provided they wear socks and walk in a clockwise direction through the suspended labyrinth. Related: Human-Scale Spider Web Made from 700 Rolls of Clear Packing Tape The art collective has created similar tape structures in the past, but this time, the museum’s brutalist backdrop is certainly part of the allure of the installation. By hanging the massive web in the wide open concrete space, the installation take on a genuine aspect of a real life web created over time by one very industrious arthropod. + Numen/For Use + Des Moines Art Center Via This is Colossal Images via Numen/For Use

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Human-size spider web made of tape invites visitors to crawl inside

Scientists in China have successfully cloned monkeys

January 25, 2018 by  
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In a major breakthrough, scientists at the Chinese Academy of Sciences Institute of Neuroscience in Shanghai have successfully cloned long-tailed macaque monkeys . This is the first instance in which scientists have cloned primates and may open the door to cloning humans in the future. “Humans are primates. So (for) the cloning of primate species, including humans, the technical barrier is now broken,” cloning program supervisor Muming Poo told reporters . However, Poo insisted that the cloning of primates was intended to serve research purposes, particularly for medicine and human health. The famous primate clones , two identical long-tailed macaques that were born two weeks apart, have been named Zhong Zhong and Hua Hua. At less than two months old, the young monkeys are growing normally and are expected to be soon joined by additional macaque clones born within months. Zhong Zhong and Hua Hua were created through a process known as somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), in which the nucleus of a cell, with its contained genetic information, is transferred into an egg from which the nucleus has been removed. This technique has been used to successfully clone over 20 species of animals, including dogs, cows, and pigs. Perhaps the most famously cloned species is the sheep, which became the first mammal species to be cloned from an adult somatic cell in 1996 when Dolly the sheep was born in Scotland . Related: China to break ground on world’s largest animal cloning factory next year Previous attempts to use SCNT to clone primates had failed. Even the recent success was the result of repeated failure; 127 eggs were used to produce the two live macaque births. “It remains a very inefficient and hazardous procedure,” Robin Lovell-Badge, a cloning expert at the Francis Crick Institute in London and unaffiliated with the primate cloning in China , told Reuters . “The work in this paper is not a stepping-stone to establishing methods for obtaining live born human clones. This clearly remains a very foolish thing to attempt.” Via Reuters Images via Chinese Academy of Sciences/Reuters and Depositphotos

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Scientists in China have successfully cloned monkeys

The Springingstream Guesthouse mimics the mountains of China with an undulating roof

January 25, 2018 by  
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Beijing-based studio WEI Architects renovated an abandoned building in China’s remote Fujian province into a beautiful guest home using traditional materials and construction techniques. The architects breathed new life into the Springingstream Guesthouse by installing reclaimed materials and creating a series of undulating roofs that mimic the outline of the mountainous landscape. The guest home is located in a remote valley that has been abandoned over the years. Although the majority of the homes in the area are derelict, there is a new movement to preserve the history of the area . WEI Architects were commissioned to develop a project that could serve as a prototype for restoring the existing properties in an attempt to revitalize the village. The project was even part of a national TV program, which drew a lot of attention to the efforts. Related: Wavy green-roofed Casa Jura disappears into France’s rolling hills The existing structure was an old home that had been abandoned for years. The architects worked carefully to bring it back to life while retaining as much as the existing structure as possible. The home’s old timber panels and various materials were used in the new structure, while stone bases and other materials were locally-sourced. Local labor was also used to restore the old building using traditional methods. “Local villagers with building techniques were hired to ensure the traditional construction methods, like the mortise-and-tenon structure and special transformational window-door framing,” said the architects. The architects were also inspired by the local scenery, which they used as a guide to create a serene atmosphere. The home is located on the banks of a stream that cuts through the mountainous landscape, and its undulating roof mimics its stunningly beautiful backdrop. Additionally, the undulating roof juts out over the structure, creating covered verandahs for the main home, as well as for a guest home that was erected on the site of the former sheep pens. Landscaping made of local plants and stones creates a rustic walking path that connects the two structures. The completed building will serve as a bed and breakfast that generates income for the community. Accordingly, the interior design blends tradition with modern comforts for visiting guests. The interior layout follows the local tradition of arranging the rooms around a central hearth. Exposed brick and traditional furniture also pay homage to the home’s history. Although seeped in tradition, the renovated guest home does have a few modern touches. A copper path set within the poured concrete flooring runs from the entrance to a lounge space and then a covered outdoor terrace that serves as the tea room. The second floor of the structure houses two bedrooms that feature large windows with movable wooden panels that provide natural ventilation and stunning views of the scenery. + WEI Architects Via Dezeen Images via WEI Architects

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The Springingstream Guesthouse mimics the mountains of China with an undulating roof

Zilvinas Kempinas Gives Us Tunnel Vision With His Amazing TUBE Made of VHS Tape

July 24, 2012 by  
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Read the rest of Zilvinas Kempinas Gives Us Tunnel Vision With His Amazing TUBE Made of VHS Tape Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Art , eco design , eco-art , green art , green design , lithuanian art , lithuanian artist , magnetic tape , recycled art , Recycled Materials , recycled tape , sustainable art , sustainable design , tape art , Venice Biennale , vhs tape , zilvinas kempinas

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Fakro’s Innovative Windows Transform Into an Airy Rooftop Balcony

July 24, 2012 by  
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Read the rest of Fakro’s Innovative Windows Transform Into an Airy Rooftop Balcony Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: balcony windows , eco design , Fakro , Fakro windows , green design , modular balcony , skylights , sustainable design , transformative windows

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The London Underground Tube Tent is a Perfect Party Tent for the Summer Olympics

July 24, 2012 by  
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From treehouse tents to geodesic dome tents , we’re all about portable shelters here at Inhabitat, so with the Olympics kicking off later this week we were pretty excited to come across this jumbo tent that’s shaped like a train in the London Underground. The tent is an exact replica of a car on the Northern Line, and it’s big enough to accommodate an actual trainload of people — it sleeps up to 20 but can fit as many as 72 people. A night in the tent will cost you more than a ride on the Underground, though; the tent retails for a whopping $3,100 (£1,999), and it costs a minimum of $775 (£500) to rent. via BoingBoing + London Underground Tent

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The London Underground Tube Tent is a Perfect Party Tent for the Summer Olympics

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