Skinny micro-home creates illusion of space with natural light and materials

March 2, 2018 by  
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Space-saving furniture and ample glazing are key in making this skinny timber house welcoming and livable despite its tiny footprint slightly larger than the average parking space. Dutch practice Ana Rocha Architecture designed the micro-home, named Slim Fit, in Almere Poort, the Netherlands. The home comprises 538 square feet of living space across three floors. Clad in vertically oriented Ayous hardwood that appear to emphasize height, the 172-square-foot Slim Fit avoids a monolithic appearance thanks to the heat-resistant glass windows of varying sizes punctuating the facade. The windows also allow for cross-breezes and fill the interior with natural light. Tall ceilings, birch plywood paneling, and a minimalist design add to the illusion of spaciousness. Related: Rotterdam couple lives in a skinny house built from 15 tonnes of industrial waste The three-story skinny home includes a kitchen and dining area on the first floor, while the living room is placed on the second level. The bedroom with a bathroom and wardrobe is located on the top-most level. Custom space-saving furniture and elements constructed from birch offer subtle but effective ways for creating a bright and airy appearance, from sliding doors to an open-tread staircase that connects to open shelving. + Ana Rocha Architecture Via Dezeen Images by Christiane Wirth

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Skinny micro-home creates illusion of space with natural light and materials

German slang wraps around MVRDV-designed building for Munich

November 23, 2017 by  
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German architecture takes a playful turn in WERK12, a mixed-use building designed by MVRDV that’s just broke ground in Munich . Located in a post-industrial site in the emerging Werksviertel neighborhood, WERK12 draws inspiration from its industrial heritage and modern graffiti culture. To set the mood for the stylish spaces within, MVRDV teamed up with artists Engelmann and Engl to wrap the building in 5-meter-tall German slang lettering that light up at night. Located near Munich’s East Station, the 9,600-square-meter WERK12 was commissioned by OTEC GmbH & Co. KG as part of a 40-hectare urban regeneration masterplan that will create approximately 1,200 new homes and up to 7,000 new jobs. The mixed-use building will comprise loft-style offices, restaurants, sports facilities, a skyline swimming pool, and restaurants for nightlife and gastronomy. The façade’s use of giant German words, found in various youth and subculture groups, as public signage is a nod to the graffiti culture and extensive use of signage found around the area. “WERK12 is totally unique and entirely new for Munich and is a strong contrast to the historic centre just ten minutes away”, says Jacob van Rijs, MVRDV co-founder. “It is a flexible and completely user adaptable building with spaces that can transform over time with bold and expressive texts on the façade are visible from a distance. This transparent building becomes a new focal point on the new Plaza that will form the heart of the Werksviertel.” Related: China’s new futuristic library is unlike any we’ve seen before The five-floor building will be optimized for natural daylight and feature tall ceilings and airy, open spaces flexible enough for multiple uses. The high ceilings, all over 5 meter in height, allows for split levels to break up the space and add visual interest. MVRDV pushed the elevator shaft and fire escape stairs to the outside of the building to create the deep and flexible interiors, while turning the outdoor stairways into a focal point punctuated by 3.25-meter-wide terraces . WERK12 is slated for completion in February 2019. + MVRDV

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German slang wraps around MVRDV-designed building for Munich

Old converted church hides gorgeous modern interiors in London

September 1, 2017 by  
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An old Victorian-style church in London was transformed into a gorgeous modern home that belies its historic exterior. Purchased by local interior designer Gianna Camilotti in 2013, this late 19th century church was gutted and converted into a contemporary home and office that still retains the building’s historic charms. Gianna Camilotti Interiors designed much of the furniture in-house within the Grade II-listed property. Located in Chingford, North East London, The James Spicer Memorial Church Hall School had served as a school and meeting place. In 2013, Camilotti snapped up the property and gave the tired building a luxurious makeover . The goal was to create a unique space that could accommodate intimate gatherings of friends with “an atmosphere of London piano-bars.” The award-winning church conversion project was recently put up for rent on Portico . Related: Historic Missouri church rises from the ashes with an eco-friendly twist The 237-square-meter building’s original vaulted doors and windows were preserved and the curved oak beams exposed. The interior features an open-plan design with a spacious living room, dining area, and kitchen on the first floor and a master bedroom with ensuite bathroom as well as a second bedroom on the upper floor. The vaulted ceiling reaches 9 meters in height in the middle of the home. Luxury amenities include underfloor heating installed throughout the interior, granite countertops, a self-playing digital piano, and an assortment of furnishings designed by Camilotti. The lavish interiors also open up to an outdoor garden area and patio with seating. + Gianna Camilotti Interiors Via Contemporist Images via Portico

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Old converted church hides gorgeous modern interiors in London

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