Celebrate inclusivity and sustainability with these outdoor Pride activities

June 10, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

June is Pride month, and there are celebrations happening in major city centers all over the world. A small but growing number of activities is also happening throughout the most wild and natural corners of the U.S. and beyond. LGBTQ+-focused outdoor activities and safe spaces are increasing in number and visibility, and though there are more this month than ever, they are all part of a movement to promote inclusivity and representation among those who love the outdoors — and those who don’t know they love it yet. Where to find outdoor Pride activities The Venture Out Project This LGBTQ+-owned company has hosted queer-specific trips since 2014. This June, it is offering a Queer & Trans, Indigenous, People of Color Backpacking Trip in Vermont and a Queer Arctic Adventure in Canada. It also offers more low-key day hikes , family trips and youth service projects. Related: The ultimate checklist of backpacking essentials Canyons River Company Based in Idaho, this company offers a River Pride Trip, a six-day rafting trip on the Salmon River that includes wine tasting . National Outdoor Leadership School This organization has an LGBTQ+ backpacking trip in Utah, which takes place over nine days and is led by queer instructors. Outdoor adventures for LGBTQ+ youth Learning in the outdoors has proven benefits for kids, including building skills and self-esteem as well as increasing performance in the classroom. A limited number of LGBTQ+-focused youth trips and activities allow youth to explore their identities and the outdoors in a safe, inclusive space. Out There Adventures is a Seattle-based company that offers trips led by queer instructors for LGBTQ+ youth. It is offering two Pride-focused events this summer: a rafting and service trip for teenagers in Oregon and a Yosemite trip in July. According to one young participant of an Out There Adventures trip, “I would get these overwhelming feelings of being at home and knowing that those were some of the only moments in my life where I was 100 percent sure that I was in the right place and 100 percent sure that it was something that I wanted to do for the rest of my life. I would be willing to do things to keep myself in good health and motivated and educated in order to achieve those feelings over and over and over.” Events in your own backyard If you don’t have the interest or ability to attend a far-flung trip to celebrate Pride, you can focus locally on ways to get outside and active. Many cities have 5K runs, walks or dance events as part of their Pride festivities. This can be a great way to get fresh air and exercise , especially for people who get their motivation from community members or a loud bass line instead of a babbling brook. Research your local gym and see if it is hosting any Pride events, like Homoclimbtastic in West Virginia. If the gyms near you are not hosting an event, speak up and ask why not. The more interest they hear, the more likely they are to consider adding something to the calendar next year. Check out MeetUp.com to find groups of like-minded people in your area. There might already be an LGBTQ+-focused outdoor group near you. If not, create one yourself! How to be eco-friendly at Pride parades The Seattle-based organization OUT For Sustainability aims to make Pride events around the country carbon-neutral and zero waste . Follow the organization’s Greener Pride tips for a more sustainable celebration: • Bring your own water bottle to the parade. • Bring a reusable bag to collect promotional items. • Make a colorful outfit from items you already own instead of buying a new outfit. Better yet, make a costume out of recycled materials.• Avoid balloons, glitter and beads. These plastic items are toxic for the environment and detrimental to marine species. Celebrate without them. Instead, try natural body paint, flowers and recycled art. • As a vendor, remove all trash at the end of the day. Do not serve food in plastic foam containers, and offer water for people with refillable bottles. • Reduce or refuse handouts and promotional items, especially plastic items. • Avoid handing out or taking cheap T-shirts that support the unsustainable and unethical fashion industry.• Run your Pride float with electric vehicles or human power instead of diesel fuel. Tips for outdoor companies to be more inclusive Visibility and representation matter LGBTQ+ folks often do not see themselves represented in outdoor brands or websites. Consider your staff and models , and come up with a specific plan about how you will incorporate more identities. Don’t promote people just for the sake of diversity — promote and hire LGBTQ+ staff, models and managers because they are qualified and will inspire a broader audience. “We need to put people from these communities out in the forefront, not because they represent diversity but because they’re great at what they do,” said Elyse Rylander , founder of Out There Adventures. “We don’t have enough roundtables with people who are not white, cisgender dudes talking about their badass outdoor experiences. But we should.” Host LGBTQ+ events If you host trips or events, consider adding LGBTQ+-focused activities. You might take for granted feeling safe and included on hiking trips, but discrimination excludes many people from participating. It’s great to host an event during Pride month, but this is something that matters year-round. Participate in a Pride parade Walk the route or make a float . It can be a great way to show that you care about and serve all types of customers and clients. Manufacture gender-neutral gear Active gear for all genders should come in all color palettes and target all body types. LGBTQ+ outdoor advocates to follow on social media There are many advocates and activists focusing on bridging the gaps between queer folks and the great outdoors. Here are a few amazing leaders to follow on social media : Pattie Gonia A play on the “Patagonia” brand name, @PattieGonia is the self-proclaimed first nature drag queen. Pattie advocates for a more inclusive outdoor industry and takes fabulous photos that combine drag fashion with outdoor gear and awe-inspiring locations. Pattie is also offering LGBTQ+ hikes in a few cities around the U.S. during the month of June. Queer Nature A non-binary duo in Colorado founded @queernature to educate people about deeper connections to nature using both queer and indigenous philosophy and leadership. Unlikely Hikers Jenny Bruso set out to change the stereotype of what an “outdoorsy” person looks like. @unlikelyhikers ’s posts promote diversity and inclusivity in all forms, focusing primarily on body diversity and queerness. Via New York Times Images via Yannis Papanastasopoulos , Nic , Levi Saunders , Pineapple Supply Co. and NeonBrand

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Celebrate inclusivity and sustainability with these outdoor Pride activities

Flow Hive takes the hassle out of honey harvesting

June 10, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Stuart and Cedar Anderson come from a long line of beekeeping, but the father and son duo are revolutionizing the beekeeping world with their own invention, the Flow Hive . The innovative beehive lets beekeepers reduce stress on their bees by harvesting fresh honey without opening the beehive, instead letting the honey flow freely on tap. As many beekeepers know, harvesting honey is a long, arduous process that not only disturbs the hard-working bees and their homes, but is also back-breaking work for the beekeeper. Related: BEEcosystem observation hives can be installed inside or outdoors Coming from three generations of beekeepers , Stuart and Cedar Anderson knew that there had to be a better way to reap the rewards from keeping hives. According to the father and son team, “It all started because Cedar felt bad about bees being crushed during the honey harvest. He was sick of being stung and having to spend a whole week harvesting the honey from his small, semi-commercial apiary.” Putting down their protective veils and putting on their designer hats,  Stuart and Cedar designed a new beehive , built with an integrated honey harvesting system that eliminates the need for removing honey cell frames. The Flow Hive is a compact timber structure made out of laser-cut sustainable Western red cedar. The apiaries come with a pitched roof with sliding observation windows on both sides and a front window that sits over the honey shelf. The hives can contain three or more frames, which are comprised of a partially completed honeycomb matrix. The bees fill the remaining cells with nectar, which eventually evaporates into honey. Once the honey is ready to be harvested, the beekeeper only has to insert a Flow Key into the top of the frame. When turned, the wax runs down a trough and into a tube, eventually flowing like liquid gold into jars. The process is much less stressful for all of the parties involved, but especially for the bees , who, after the harvesting process, realize that the comb is empty and begin to repair and refill the cells once again. + Flow Hive Images via Flow Hive

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Flow Hive takes the hassle out of honey harvesting

Berlin T-shirt vending machine shows shoppers real cost of cheap fashion

May 3, 2015 by  
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Would you be tempted to buy a T-shirt from a flashy-looking urban vending machine for less than $3? Berliners recently had the opportunity and many pounced, unaware that their attempted purchase was part of an awareness-raising campaign related to Fashion Revolution Day. The aqua-and-black painted machine offered T-shirts for just €2 or roughly $2.25 USD, but instead, would-be T-shirt buyers received a surprise: images of sweatshop labor with statistics on the abysmally low wages textile workers earn by making cheap T-shirts and such. Click through to learn more about this campaign and see a video of the vending machine in question, as well as find out how you can get involved. READ MORE > Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: berlin , cheap clothing , clothing factory workers , fashion revolution day , sweatshop labor , t-shirt vending machine , textile workers

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Berlin T-shirt vending machine shows shoppers real cost of cheap fashion

Project Repat Upcycles Your Old T-Shirts into Blankets

May 31, 2013 by  
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Let’s face it, many of us collect T-shirts, often unintentionally. We get them at school events, road races, fundraisers and as travel souvenirs. Those T-shirts may be valuable to us because of the memories associated with them, but…

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Project Repat Upcycles Your Old T-Shirts into Blankets

Why T-Shirts Can’t Be Recycled into New T-Shirts

May 9, 2013 by  
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When you donate a pile of old T-shirts to a local charity, they will not be recycled back into T-shirts. The fibers are usually too worn to be made into soft fabric. That doesn’t mean, though, that these fibers go …

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Why T-Shirts Can’t Be Recycled into New T-Shirts

Corn Silos Reimagined as Bed and Breakfast in Oregon

May 9, 2013 by  
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Written by Clint Williams, Mother Nature Network Famers are known for making do with what they have. Turning a bit of inner tube into a tractor fan belt, for example. Or, say, converting idle grain silos into luxury suites for …

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Corn Silos Reimagined as Bed and Breakfast in Oregon

Loomstate Launches New Line of Organic Cotton T-Shirts to Aid Hurricane Sandy Recovery Efforts

January 13, 2013 by  
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With Congress dragging its feet, NYC-based fashion company  Loomstate  is putting together a Superstorm Sandy relief package of its own. The company recently launched a trio of 100-percent organic-cotton T-shirts to benefit disaster recovery efforts. Each shirt features a “word cross” of rallying verbs (“recover,” “rebuild,” “restore,” “revive”), plus the name of one of the areas hardest hit: Long Island, the Rockaways, and New Jersey. And best of all, all proceeds will go to  Waves for Water  and  Food Bank For New York City . READ MORE > Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: eco-fashion , loomstate , NYC , organic cotton , organic cotton t-shirts , rockaways , sandy relief , shirts , storm recovery , Sumperstorm Sandy , t-shirts , word cross

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Loomstate Launches New Line of Organic Cotton T-Shirts to Aid Hurricane Sandy Recovery Efforts

Bulletproof Jackets and Backpacks a Disturbing New Trend in Children’s Fashion

January 12, 2013 by  
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Body armor is being worn by more than just SWAT teams these days. In the wake of the horrific massacre at a school in Newtown, Conn. last month, a Colombian company is planning to produce a line of bulletproof T-shirts, vests, and backpack-jacket hybrids for the U.S. market. The Colombian businessman behind the bulletproof clothing, Miguel Caballero, told  AFP  that in the weeks following the Connecticut shooting he received numerous requests from worried parents seeking to protect their kids with armored clothing. READ MORE >   Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: body armor , Children , children’s body armor , children’s fashion , connecticut , eco-fashion , ecouterre , Miguel Caballero , Newtown , Newtown massacre , parenting , school , school shooting

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Bulletproof Jackets and Backpacks a Disturbing New Trend in Children’s Fashion

Alice Waters’ Edible Schoolyard Launches Hand-Designed Levi’s Tees Over Lunch

August 26, 2011 by  
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Imagine a world in which schoolchildren eat organic, locally sourced lunches rich with fruits and vegetables — some of them heirloom varietals, some of them grown on the school grounds. That is the world that Alice Waters, the celebrity chef at Berkeley’s Chez Panisse , is promoting through her Edible Schoolyard project. This week, as part of Chez Panisse’s 40th anniversary celebration, Waters threw a school lunch block party in downtown San Francisco, co-hosted by Levi’s — and Inhabitat was there to check it out. Read the rest of Alice Waters’ Edible Schoolyard Launches Hand-Designed Levi’s Tees Over Lunch Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: alice waters , david byrne , Edible Schoolyard , green design , Levis , San Francisco , sophia coppolla , t-shirts

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Alice Waters’ Edible Schoolyard Launches Hand-Designed Levi’s Tees Over Lunch

The Week in Pictures: A T-Shirt Chair, New York Fashion Week, and More (Slideshow)

February 18, 2011 by  
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Before you toss that old raggedy t-shirt, maybe you should consider making it into a contemporary chair. That’s the thought-process behind a chair made of T-shirts, winner of Sweden’s 2011 Green Furniture Award. We also have exclusive coverage of New York Fashion Week, a gorgeous electric Porsche, the end of drowning Plaster Paris statues in Bombay, and more in the Week in Pictures, our roundup of the best photos on TreeHugger this week.

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The Week in Pictures: A T-Shirt Chair, New York Fashion Week, and More (Slideshow)

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