IKEA launches a beachy collection with World Surf League

May 16, 2022 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green, Recycle

Two iconic agencies have come together to launch a product lineup that caters to the outdoor lifestyle and the environment . IKEA, in partnership with the World Surf League, released the KÅSEBERGA collection in early May 2022. With respect to the ocean and the recreational lifestyle surrounding it, the collection is practical and made from eco-friendly materials. At home and on the go, the KÅSEBERGA collection responds to life with products that are adaptable to changing conditions. Related: IKEA purchases forested land in Georgia for conservation “These needs are relevant for many more people than surfers and inspired us to create products that enrich everybody’s lives with similar demands,” said Wiebke Braasch, designer at IKEA of Sweden . “With this collection, we hope to spread the joy of the surfing lifestyle in the home and everyday life of many people.” Products include a beach towel, yoga mat , water bottle, a hand plane for body surfing and a bag uniquely designed to aid in beach clean-ups, among others. The partnership makes sense. The World Surf League’s has a passion for the ocean. Meanwhile, IKEA’s mission to produce quality, affordable and environmentally-friendly products.  Furthermore, the collaboration included input from reputable surfers Kassia Meador and Rob Machado. There was an emphasis on designs that are low-impact for the water , air and planet. However, a high impact in regards to function and fashion.  “It has been an honor and a pleasure to team up with Rob Machado, the WSL and IKEA to create KÅSEBERGA,” said Kassia Meador, surfer and business owner. “A collection of ocean-inspired home goods and on-the-go surf essentials in the most functional high vibe low impact way. For the ever-growing global community of earth-conscious surfers and beach lovers.” The name of the collection, KÅSEBERGA, comes from a small city in Sweden. It’s home to one of the most southern surf breaks in the country. Thereby, many of the products are made from recycled polyester, diverted from the landfill. Other materials are made from renewable materials, such as bamboo and cork.  “Watching the IKEA KÅSEBERGA collaboration come to life and working with their designers on developing these sustainable products has been a truly rewarding experience for us at WSL,” said Cherie Cohen, WSL chief revenue officer. “IKEA’s sustainability initiatives align closely with those of the WSL and our fans. We are confident that these products made using recycled and renewable materials will be hugely popular with surfers, ocean lovers and design enthusiasts.” + IKEA x World Surf League Images via IKEA

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IKEA launches a beachy collection with World Surf League

Asian woman-owned EQUO creates 100% plastic free utensils

May 13, 2022 by  
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Vietnam-based sustainability company EQUO raised $1.3 million in seed funding to create sugarcane-based alternatives to single-use plastics . EQUO, founded in 2020 by Marina Tran-Vu, offers plastic-free and compostable products made of coffee, coconut and sugarcane. The difference with EQUO ? Creating sustainable products that are convenient and require no change in lifestyle to adopt an eco-friendly alternative. The startup was named one of nine winners of the UNOPS S3i Innovation Center Sweden Global Challenge. EQUO was also a top 18 finalist in the Ending Plastic Pollution Innovation Challenge by the UNDP. Related: Silvr offers smart alternative to single-use utensils EQUO products are available on Amazon , on their website and several retailers. The funds from the seed round raise will be used to expand the product line, develop the technical capabilities to scale the business quickly and to increase brand awareness. “The best way for us to make an impact is not to recycle or upcycle single-use plastic, but to stop its production altogether,” said Tran-Vu. “ EQUO will help do that by offering products made from alternative materials, but doing it in a fun and approachable way that gets consumers, businesses and big corporations to pay attention.” As a sole female founder, Tran-Vu is part of a small percentage of startups founded solely by women who received venture capital or private funding. “Our vision is to replace all single-use plastic on the planet. This isn’t just about the visible plastic we see in our environment , but also about the downstream effects of microplastics ,” said Tran-Vu. “We are excited about the new products we are delivering this year to show the world all the things we can do without single-use plastic and (in some cases) paper.” The company first launched into the market with drinking straws. Now, they announced a line of utensils made of coffee and wood, sugarcane food containers and compostable bags. + EQUO Images via EQUO When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn commissions at no cost to you.

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Asian woman-owned EQUO creates 100% plastic free utensils

Sleep among birds in this biosphere tree hotel

April 19, 2022 by  
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In the midst of towering pines of a beautiful Swedish landscape is a huge orb hanging suspended from the trees. It is made up of 350 birdhouses. The birdhouses make up a posh hotel room that you can actually go and sleep in. The Treehotel Biosphere encompasses the aesthetics of Nordic design: clean lines, simple elegance and neutral colors. Treehotel has eight different suites altogether. The eighth is the sky suite seen here. Additionally, it contains 111 square feet, and yes, the exterior holds 350 birdhouses. They’re functional. The design encourages wildlife to come and nest. Therefore, all the birdhouses are made with wood in simple, clean designs. Related: Biophilic Treehouse imagines a greener office experience Furthermore, the building itself has glass everywhere. It creates views of the trees beyond, while the birdhouses provide privacy and interior shade. On the other hand, the suite has an accessible roof, where guests can stand and look around at the forest . It’s a temporary suite for humans, but it’s a permanent home for the many birds who will come to live in the birdhouses. The towering Swedish pines are just as much a part of the experience, creating incredible views from all angles. Moreover, all eight suites that make up Treehotel are different. Each design incorporates sustainability and futuristic aesthetic. You can spend a night in the Bird’s Nest, the Mirrorcube or the Dragonfly, among others. The birdhouse design is called Biosphere. It’s a glass cube covered in wooden birdhouses that give the structure a more orb-like shape. The Biosphere suite minimalist design that includes a loft bedroom , comfortable sitting area and bathroom. The incredible design was designed by Bjarke Ingels Group , Snohetta, Rintala and Tham and Videgard Arkitekter. Spend a night in the trees surrounded by the birds and see how simple design can actually add to the environment and provide more living spaces for wildlife. What a unique concept for a hotel! + Bjarke Ingels Group Images via Bjarke Ingels Group

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Sleep among birds in this biosphere tree hotel

Sleep among birds in this biosphere tree hotel

April 19, 2022 by  
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In the midst of towering pines of a beautiful Swedish landscape is a huge orb hanging suspended from the trees. It is made up of 350 birdhouses. The birdhouses make up a posh hotel room that you can actually go and sleep in. The Treehotel Biosphere encompasses the aesthetics of Nordic design: clean lines, simple elegance and neutral colors. Treehotel has eight different suites altogether. The eighth is the sky suite seen here. Additionally, it contains 111 square feet, and yes, the exterior holds 350 birdhouses. They’re functional. The design encourages wildlife to come and nest. Therefore, all the birdhouses are made with wood in simple, clean designs. Related: Biophilic Treehouse imagines a greener office experience Furthermore, the building itself has glass everywhere. It creates views of the trees beyond, while the birdhouses provide privacy and interior shade. On the other hand, the suite has an accessible roof, where guests can stand and look around at the forest . It’s a temporary suite for humans, but it’s a permanent home for the many birds who will come to live in the birdhouses. The towering Swedish pines are just as much a part of the experience, creating incredible views from all angles. Moreover, all eight suites that make up Treehotel are different. Each design incorporates sustainability and futuristic aesthetic. You can spend a night in the Bird’s Nest, the Mirrorcube or the Dragonfly, among others. The birdhouse design is called Biosphere. It’s a glass cube covered in wooden birdhouses that give the structure a more orb-like shape. The Biosphere suite minimalist design that includes a loft bedroom , comfortable sitting area and bathroom. The incredible design was designed by Bjarke Ingels Group , Snohetta, Rintala and Tham and Videgard Arkitekter. Spend a night in the trees surrounded by the birds and see how simple design can actually add to the environment and provide more living spaces for wildlife. What a unique concept for a hotel! + Bjarke Ingels Group Images via Bjarke Ingels Group

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Sleep among birds in this biosphere tree hotel

Geothermal power fuels the fun at Chena Hot Springs

April 19, 2022 by  
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As my group wanders through the sulfur-smelling  greenhouse , looking at tomatoes growing in vertical hangers and a room with 33 types of lettuce, I feel the pull of the huge natural hot springs outside. It’s hard to go on an educational tour of a greenhouse and power plant when I could be soaking mindlessly in a pool of water thick with sulfate, chloride and bicarbonate of sodium. But I’m trying to get a well-rounded picture of  Chena Hot Springs and understand its tagline of “where hospitality and sustainability go hand in hand.” The hot springs resort is 60 miles northeast of Fairbanks, Alaska, and accessible year-round. In winter, you can ride in a dogsled and stay up late hoping for a glimpse of the aurora borealis. In summer, you can take a guided float down the river, looking for bears and moose. Year-round, the resort offers a free tour of the greenhouse and power plant. These facilities are the heart of the operation, generating  geothermal  power to heat guest cabins and growing delicious salad greens even in the dead of winter. Related: Alaska’s Kenai Visitor Center provides a refuge from the outside world Chena Hot Springs h istory In 1905, two  gold  mining brothers heard that a geological survey crew had spotted steam rising from the upper Chena River. Mining is a hard life, so the prospectors, Thomas and Robert Swan, set out in a boat to find the hot springs. A month later, Robert was soaking away his rheumatism. Of course, everybody else on the hardscrabble  Alaskan  frontier had aches and pains, too. Fairbanks entrepreneur George W. Wilson heard about the Swans’ discovery and decided to homestead the land and turn it into a resort. By 1911, Chena Hot Springs had a stable, bathhouse and 12 small visitor cabins. The waters got a reputation for curing blood disorders, rheumatism, scalp disease and troubles of the stomach, liver and kidneys. In 1921, Wilson advertised in the “ Fairbanks Daily News Miner ,” “Plenty of provisions now on hand, including vegetables, and we also have a pool table. Come and bring your best girl with you and have a dance, you will feel like it, suppled up after one of these baths.” Nowadays, the  resort  is one of interior Alaska’s top attractions, drawing people from all over the world to stay in its 80 rooms. The rock pool was expanded about seven years ago. It’s huge, with plenty of room to float or paddle lazily around in the hot water. Activities People came for the hot springs, but now visitors extend their stay at the resort for various activities. On a typical day in  winter , the thermometer only nudges up to the teens in Fahrenheit, if that. When I visited in February, snow was thick on the ground — perfect for dog sledding or snowmobiling. I chose to dogsled. I was there with members of a professional group, and it was a little more intimate than expected when the musher instructed the biggest person to get in the back of the sleigh and the other two to consecutively recline on him. This setup would be less awkward with close friends and family. Then the musher stood behind us and directed the team of 12 extremely hardworking  dogs  to pull us on a lovely little loop through the snowy woods. Considering our combined weight, we didn’t go very fast. Visitors can also take a behind-the-scenes kennel tour where you can ask a musher all your sled dog questions and pet puppies, if available. Chena leads aurora tours during aurora viewing season, from autumn to early spring. Visitors ride up to the top of nearby peak Charlie Dome in military-style vehicles. There they can keep warm in Mongolian-style  yurts , drinking hot chocolate and waiting for the lights to appear. The dome allows a 360-degree view, without light interference from the resort. If you go, don’t miss the ice  museum . It feels like a giant walk-in refrigerator and looks like an ice castle, filled with chandeliers and sculptures made of ice. There’s even an ice bar where you can get a drink in a glass made of ice. In summer, Chena offers activities like horseback riding and a half-day river float looking for  wildlife . But don’t overbook on tours — you’ll want plenty of free time to hang out in the hot pool. Chena’s geothermal power At the powerhouse, our guide tells us about Chena’s clean energy. The hot springs come out of the water at about 164 degrees Fahrenheit, making it the world’s lowest temperature geothermal resource to be used for commercial power production. Since 164 falls short of boiling, the resort uses Freon to bring the water up to a temperature hot enough to move turbines. Chena and the Department of Energy are working together on a $1.4 million exploration project to dig deeper and find hotter  water . The hope is that by digging to 4,000 feet they’ll hit water hot enough to ditch the Freon and run on all clean energy. Then, Chena can also sell excess energy to the government. Even if overnight guests aren’t interested in taking the geothermal tour, they’ll still enjoy having their floors warmed by hot water pumped from the springs. Right now, Chena has three separate wells, one each for soaking, heat and power, our guide told us. This is in case one well gets contaminated from Freon. Once they’re drilling down deep enough and the water’s hot enough to not use  chemicals , then they’ll be able to use wells interchangeably. Chena’s greenhouse provides the resort with peppers, lettuce, cucumbers, tomatoes and herbs. As the website likes to boast, Chena Hot Springs Restaurant makes Alaska’s freshest  salad , year-round. Resort proprietor Bernie Karl designed the vertical bucket lettuce grow towers himself. And you can learn to  build them yourself  at home if you want a terrific tomato yield in a small space. If you visit  Chena Hot Springs Chena Hot Springs is popular in every season, but I loved bobbing around the rock pool in winter, staying warm while being surrounded by  snowy  fields and peaks. Winter must be the most magical time to visit a hot spring. Still, if you find yourself in  Fairbanks  at any time of the year, plan a little detour to Chena, at least for a day. + Chena Hot Springs Images via Teresa Bergen / Inhabitat

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Geothermal power fuels the fun at Chena Hot Springs

Geothermal power fuels the fun at Chena Hot Springs

April 19, 2022 by  
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As my group wanders through the sulfur-smelling  greenhouse , looking at tomatoes growing in vertical hangers and a room with 33 types of lettuce, I feel the pull of the huge natural hot springs outside. It’s hard to go on an educational tour of a greenhouse and power plant when I could be soaking mindlessly in a pool of water thick with sulfate, chloride and bicarbonate of sodium. But I’m trying to get a well-rounded picture of  Chena Hot Springs and understand its tagline of “where hospitality and sustainability go hand in hand.” The hot springs resort is 60 miles northeast of Fairbanks, Alaska, and accessible year-round. In winter, you can ride in a dogsled and stay up late hoping for a glimpse of the aurora borealis. In summer, you can take a guided float down the river, looking for bears and moose. Year-round, the resort offers a free tour of the greenhouse and power plant. These facilities are the heart of the operation, generating  geothermal  power to heat guest cabins and growing delicious salad greens even in the dead of winter. Related: Alaska’s Kenai Visitor Center provides a refuge from the outside world Chena Hot Springs h istory In 1905, two  gold  mining brothers heard that a geological survey crew had spotted steam rising from the upper Chena River. Mining is a hard life, so the prospectors, Thomas and Robert Swan, set out in a boat to find the hot springs. A month later, Robert was soaking away his rheumatism. Of course, everybody else on the hardscrabble  Alaskan  frontier had aches and pains, too. Fairbanks entrepreneur George W. Wilson heard about the Swans’ discovery and decided to homestead the land and turn it into a resort. By 1911, Chena Hot Springs had a stable, bathhouse and 12 small visitor cabins. The waters got a reputation for curing blood disorders, rheumatism, scalp disease and troubles of the stomach, liver and kidneys. In 1921, Wilson advertised in the “ Fairbanks Daily News Miner ,” “Plenty of provisions now on hand, including vegetables, and we also have a pool table. Come and bring your best girl with you and have a dance, you will feel like it, suppled up after one of these baths.” Nowadays, the  resort  is one of interior Alaska’s top attractions, drawing people from all over the world to stay in its 80 rooms. The rock pool was expanded about seven years ago. It’s huge, with plenty of room to float or paddle lazily around in the hot water. Activities People came for the hot springs, but now visitors extend their stay at the resort for various activities. On a typical day in  winter , the thermometer only nudges up to the teens in Fahrenheit, if that. When I visited in February, snow was thick on the ground — perfect for dog sledding or snowmobiling. I chose to dogsled. I was there with members of a professional group, and it was a little more intimate than expected when the musher instructed the biggest person to get in the back of the sleigh and the other two to consecutively recline on him. This setup would be less awkward with close friends and family. Then the musher stood behind us and directed the team of 12 extremely hardworking  dogs  to pull us on a lovely little loop through the snowy woods. Considering our combined weight, we didn’t go very fast. Visitors can also take a behind-the-scenes kennel tour where you can ask a musher all your sled dog questions and pet puppies, if available. Chena leads aurora tours during aurora viewing season, from autumn to early spring. Visitors ride up to the top of nearby peak Charlie Dome in military-style vehicles. There they can keep warm in Mongolian-style  yurts , drinking hot chocolate and waiting for the lights to appear. The dome allows a 360-degree view, without light interference from the resort. If you go, don’t miss the ice  museum . It feels like a giant walk-in refrigerator and looks like an ice castle, filled with chandeliers and sculptures made of ice. There’s even an ice bar where you can get a drink in a glass made of ice. In summer, Chena offers activities like horseback riding and a half-day river float looking for  wildlife . But don’t overbook on tours — you’ll want plenty of free time to hang out in the hot pool. Chena’s geothermal power At the powerhouse, our guide tells us about Chena’s clean energy. The hot springs come out of the water at about 164 degrees Fahrenheit, making it the world’s lowest temperature geothermal resource to be used for commercial power production. Since 164 falls short of boiling, the resort uses Freon to bring the water up to a temperature hot enough to move turbines. Chena and the Department of Energy are working together on a $1.4 million exploration project to dig deeper and find hotter  water . The hope is that by digging to 4,000 feet they’ll hit water hot enough to ditch the Freon and run on all clean energy. Then, Chena can also sell excess energy to the government. Even if overnight guests aren’t interested in taking the geothermal tour, they’ll still enjoy having their floors warmed by hot water pumped from the springs. Right now, Chena has three separate wells, one each for soaking, heat and power, our guide told us. This is in case one well gets contaminated from Freon. Once they’re drilling down deep enough and the water’s hot enough to not use  chemicals , then they’ll be able to use wells interchangeably. Chena’s greenhouse provides the resort with peppers, lettuce, cucumbers, tomatoes and herbs. As the website likes to boast, Chena Hot Springs Restaurant makes Alaska’s freshest  salad , year-round. Resort proprietor Bernie Karl designed the vertical bucket lettuce grow towers himself. And you can learn to  build them yourself  at home if you want a terrific tomato yield in a small space. If you visit  Chena Hot Springs Chena Hot Springs is popular in every season, but I loved bobbing around the rock pool in winter, staying warm while being surrounded by  snowy  fields and peaks. Winter must be the most magical time to visit a hot spring. Still, if you find yourself in  Fairbanks  at any time of the year, plan a little detour to Chena, at least for a day. + Chena Hot Springs Images via Teresa Bergen / Inhabitat

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Geothermal power fuels the fun at Chena Hot Springs

How many trees does it take to meet toilet paper demands?

February 16, 2022 by  
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How many rolls of toilet paper do you think you use each year? Your household? Your neighborhood, city, or state? What about the entire country? QS Supplies wanted to know the answer and conducted a study to find out. The results are astounding. Unfortunately, it’s not something we often stop to contemplate, but when we do think about it, we know toilet paper comes from trees. In fact, studies estimate a single tree can produce up to 1,500 rolls of toilet paper. That sounds like a lot for a  plant -to-product ratio but is much less impressive once adjusted for typical consumer consumption.  Related: The environmental problem with toilet paper and what to use instead The usage number is important and varies widely from one country to another. We’re talking about a lot of  waste  here and not just the kind that goes down the toilet. To really have a picture of the impact, we must consider the entire product cycle of toilet paper.  The toilet paper production process First, there are the workers that use heavy equipment to cut down the trees. This results in water and air  pollution  through fuels used for vehicles and chainsaws. Then we have transport emissions to processing plants, the impact of the manufacturing plants, plastic packaging, and further transport to the stores. Finally, we have to add in the transport emissions to individual businesses and homes.  How much toilet paper does each country use? In the end, the roll count contributes to much more than just cutting trees and flushing them down the toilet. So what are those numbers? It depends where you live. Considering estimates that 70% of the planet’s population doesn’t use toilet paper, relying on  water  alone, it’s evident certain countries hold a higher responsibility for this wasteful practice.  Starting with the United States, it requires 31.1 million trees to meet demands each year. That’s a massive number that directly contributes to deforestation, soil erosion and loss of forest biodiversity .  Across the pond, the United Kingdom uses 3,115,437 feet of loo roll annually. That equates to 5.7 million trees that leave large swaths of barren land when cut down for TP production. China requires the most amount of trees in the world — a staggering 47 million annually. Even with replanting efforts, that kind of consumption leaves a scar on the  environment .  Down under, where the toilet water may or may not flush in the opposite direction, it carries with it the 88 rolls that the average Australian uses annually. Hong Kong, Switzerland and Sweden all use about the same amount.  The cost of toilet paper use Toilet paper usage is as much cultural as necessity. In fact, many argue toilet paper is to blame for a host of medical issues ranging from urinary tract infections to disease transmissions such as cholera, hepatitis and E. coli. So, it’s not the best cleaning method. Yet, while many parts of the world rely on water alone for bathroom clean-up, the numbers clearly show where TP usage is the norm. The average citizen in Portugal, for example, uses 11,323 rolls of toilet paper in their lifetime. In contrast, a citizen from Nigeria consumes just 56 rolls in the same amount of time.  The QS Supplies study synthesizes the resulting information in several different ways. In addition to simply calculating how much toilet paper is used, it converted that into the number of trees required to meet the need. The study then created visuals to highlight exactly how much toilet paper that really is.  Take, for example, the numbers in the United States where unrolled sheets would stretch over 2.65 billion miles, which would nearly reach Neptune. That number represents a single year of consumption for the country. The U.S. is second only to China , a country that consumes over 4 billion miles worth of the stuff.  The numbers are nothing less than staggering, and it’s difficult to conceptualize the impact. That big tree that can produce 1,500 rolls, for example, is merely enough to meet the demands of 10 people in the United States . A tree that takes decades, if not generations, to grow is converted into bum wipe for less than a dozen people, based on the average 141-roll usage per citizen per year. Finding solutions All this data crunching makes one thing crystal clear — toilet paper usage is putting a heavy weight on the planet’s resources. Replanting is only part of the answer. Reducing consumption is another. One way to knock out the puffy cotton squares is by using a bidet. Of course, it uses extra water, another sacred natural resource. But, even if everyone used bidets, the water consumption would be less than that required in toilet paper production. In addition, a bidet eliminates the need for the  plastic  film around toilet paper that further contributes to environmental waste and petroleum usage.  You can see the full report with images and research methodology  here . + QS Supplies Lead image via Pexels Images and graphics via QS Supplies

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How many trees does it take to meet toilet paper demands?

Paperless Pavilion says goodbye to paper waste

February 16, 2022 by  
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The Consulate General of the Netherlands in Guangzhou approached Superimpose Architecture to design a small pavilion to display Dutch design strategies in China during the 2021 Guangzhou Design Week. Project collaborators include the Dutch Consulate, multimedia designer Shard Island and light innovator Signify. Dubbed Paperless Pavilion, the exhibit replaces the typical event pamphlets and informational posters with live presentations and online video presentations. This approach cuts down on paper waste and challenges how content is usually presented in expositions. The pavilion was designed by Carolyn Leung, Ben de Lange, Ruben Bergambagt and JunWei Loh. Mostly constructed with white painted plasterboard with a brushed metallic veneer layer, the pavilion’s curved walls reflect the LED lights. A special carpet was used to improve acoustics in the auditorium, which is surrounded by entrance atriums via a curved outer wall. Related: Artist Hugo McCloud spotlights waste with art made of plastic bags The Paperless Pavilion’s integrative design allows for both remote and live presentations. Superimpose Architecture wanted to rethink how live presentations are given, both physically in how people gather, and in how marketing materials and content are disseminated. Presenting content without paper materials is just one part of the equation. A QR code at the pavilion’s entrance provides information about the exhibition’s content and replaces the paper marketing materials many projects use. To attract visitors, the designers rigged the pavilion with 124 linear LED light fixtures arranged in 4 horizontal bands on the exterior of the semi-circular wall outside the auditorium portion of the pavilion . The colorful, horizontal bands are arranged in rows like tulip plantings to create an abstract depiction of Dutch flower fields. Shard Island developed an interactive script for the pavilion lights. When an event occurs in the pavilion, the script directly converts real-time presentations into abstract colors through the LED lights on the wall. When the exhibition ends, the LED lights will be disassembled for reuse . + Superimpose Architecture Images via DUO Architecture Photography and Junwei Loh

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The smart, simple way ecoducts help animals survive

December 30, 2021 by  
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The Swedish Transport Administration recently announced the completion of an  ecoduct over the E6 in Skåne  in southern Sweden. The animal crossing path is the agency’s third in the country. In January, Sweden announced plans to set up several reindeer crossings to help the animals cross the dense network of roads. These bridges and underpasses, also called ecoducts, are being established globally to help animals thrive in regions with dense road networks. United States President Joe Biden has already allocated $350 million of his $1.2 trillion infrastructure plan to building wildlife crossings.  Related: A radical plan for livestock is coming to The Netherlands  In southern California , plans are underway to begin the construction of the world’s largest wildlife crossing bridge in 2022. The bridge will help isolated mountain lions cross thick road networks in the state. These structures will help reduce the high rate of wildlife collisions across the U.S. It is estimated that  about 1 to 2 million crashes  between cars and large wild animals, such as deer, occur every year. These result in over 26,000 injuries, 200 human deaths, and huge losses in terms of property damage and wildlife deaths. The crashes contribute to a reduction in animal populations, including endangered species. “Ten years ago, wildlife bridges were experimental. We didn’t know whether they would work or not. Now they’ve shown they get huge reductions in collisions. In some cases, 85% to 99% reductions,” said Rob Ament, a road ecology expert at Montana State University. “You can design them for many species. Even out in the plains, we’re getting moose crossings in North Dakota.” Today, wildlife bridges are found nearly everywhere in the world. There are organized animal crossing structures on all continents, and more are coming soon. Notable structures globally include the elephant crossing underpass near Mount Kenya in Kenya and The Alligator Alley in Florida, which helps alligators, deer and the endangered Florida panther cross the roads across the Everglades. Other wildlife crossings include the “tunnel of love” in Australia and India’s tiger corridor. All these ecoduct projects provide safe passage for diverse animal species. In Costa Rica, canopy bridges made of thick ropes help sloths and monkeys cross the roads and avoid attacks from dogs. Via The Guardian Lead image via Pixabay

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The smart, simple way ecoducts help animals survive

Greta Thunberg calls out Biden for climate action failures

December 30, 2021 by  
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Swedish teen climate activist Greta Thunberg has criticized U.S. president Joe Biden for failing to lead in the fight against the climate crisis. In a detailed  interview  with the Washington Post, the 18-year-old activist criticized Biden and other world leaders for their lack of action. Thunberg turned down a suggestion that Joe Biden is a leader in the fight against climate change. Instead, she argues that the U.S. is facilitating the climate crisis and making it even worse than it is. “It’s strange that people think of Joe Biden as a leader for the climate when you see what his administration is doing,” Thunberg said. “The US is actually expanding fossil fuel infrastructure.” Related: Greta Thunberg slams global leaders for their “blah, blah, blah” The activist says that elected leaders and those in positions of authority have relegated their duties to activists and teenagers. She says that if they were to take responsibility, they would not need to be reminded by activists about the crisis every day. “Why is the US doing that? It should not fall on us activists and teenagers who just want to go to school to raise this awareness and to inform people that we are actually facing an emergency,” Thunberg said. Although Biden has portrayed himself as a pro-climate president, many of his policies are questionable. Thunberg concluded that the president and other political leaders do not even understand what the climate crisis is all about. When asked what the president should do, Thunberg said we should all start with clear goals and understanding. “We are trying to find a solution to a crisis that we don’t understand … it’s all about the narrative. It’s all about, what are we actually trying to solve? Is it this emergency, or is it this emergency ?” Thunberg said. Thunberg was also critical of the recently concluded COP26 climate Summit in Glasgow. According to the activist, COP26 turned out to be a “PR event” in which leaders tried to create loopholes to profit from the system. Still, Thunberg says there was one lesson to learn from the Glasgow meeting. She claims the lesson learned is that the only way to solve the climate crisis is by putting massive pressure on leaders from the outside.  Despite the U.S. president pledging to lead the fight against climate change at COP26, his administration was not among the 40 countries that announced a promise to end coal mining. In November, the U.S. held the largest auction for oil and gas drilling in the Gulf of Mexico, further proof that the government is not committed to cutting emissions. Via  The Guardian Lead image via  European Parliament

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