Renewable energy is growing too slow to stop climate change

October 26, 2021 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Renewable energy is growing too slow to stop climate change

A new study published in  Nature Energy  shows that the growth rate for wind and solar power is lower than required to stop climate change. The study, conducted by the Chalmers University of Technology, Lund University in Sweden, and Central European University in Austria, has found that no country is moving fast enough to curb global warming from rising above 1.5 degrees Celsius. The study found that the production of renewable energy has been increasing at a dismal rate.  The researchers reviewed renewable energy production in 60 countries and found that the growth rate for wind and solar was lower than required in almost all countries. According to The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), a 1.4-3% yearly growth rate for renewables is needed to keep global warming below 1.5 or 2 degrees Celsius. Related: Wind is the leading source of renewable energy “This is the first time that the maximum growth rate in individual countries has been accurately measured, and it shows the enormous scale of the challenge of replacing traditional energy sources with renewables , as well as the need to explore diverse technologies and scenarios,” said Jessica Jewell, Associate Professor of Energy Transitions at the Chalmers University of Technology. In an analysis of the 60 largest countries, researchers found that the maximum growth rate for onshore wind power averages 0.8% of total electricity supply per year and 0.6% for solar. These figures are far lower than IPCC predictions. Among the countries reviewed, only smaller ones such as Portugal, Chile and Ireland managed significant growth rates above 2% for wind and 1.5% for solar. Aleh Cherp, professor of Environmental Sciences and Policy at Central European University and Lund University, says that the whole world is now behind schedule. According to the Paris Climate Accord , the world must keep global warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius based on pre-industrial levels to prevent hazardous climatic occurrences. Unfortunately, sluggish progress has remained a stumbling block across the world. “Among larger countries, only Germany has so far been able to sustain growth of onshore wind power comparable with median climate stabilization scenarios. In other words, to stay on track for climate targets, the whole world should build wind power as fast as Germany built recently,” said Cherp. + Nature Energy Lead image via Pixabay

Read more here: 
Renewable energy is growing too slow to stop climate change

Volvo teams up with Phillip Lim on sustainable weekender bag

October 18, 2021 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Volvo teams up with Phillip Lim on sustainable weekender bag

In a collaboration between iconic Volvo and well-established sustainable luxury brand 3.1 Phillip Lim, they have developed a limited-edition weekender bag made from the same bio-based material being used in Volvo’s electric cars.  The announcement is no surprise, considering the focus of both businesses. Volvo released a statement in September 2021 vowing to take an ethical stance in the name of animals by committing to leather-free materials in its current and future electric cars. The company plans to move to a line of fully electric vehicle production by 2030. Related: Adidas 100% recycled jacket is solving plastic pollution Phillip Lim has an equally defined commitment to sustainable production, with a history of products such as algae dresses and eco-sleepwear. Since the start of his business, his core focus has been on the environment .  The 3.1 Phillip Lim weekend bag is made from the same bio-based and recycled materials found in Volvo’s leather-free car interiors, known as Nordico. Nordico was developed by Volvo and is a mixture of textiles made from recycled material like PET bottles, recycled corks from the wine industry and materials from sustainable forests in Sweden and Finland. The bag was developed with the modern , eco-traveler in mind. The color’s name is Dawn, but a black color option from the same material will be released for the Volvo interiors. It showcases a Scandinavian design with inside storage and both hand and shoulder straps. Although the bag won’t be available at a retail level, the limited number produced will be showcased through competitions, charity auctions and giveaways. “Our brand mantra is to make less, mean more,” said Phillip Lim, Co-Founder and Creative Director of 3.1 Phillip Lim. “Connecting with Volvo on this sustainability project was an instant alignment of values. I strongly feel that in our collective current state of mind, we have the freedom to find sustainable solutions with new materials, while still being able to achieve high design, which is the ultimate luxury.” “We have a vision of where we need to go in the future, with the first step to ensure we harness sustainable, natural and recycled materials,” said Robin Page, head of design at Volvo Cars. “The collaboration with 3.1 Phillip Lim, to create a bag inspired by tomorrow’s materials, solidifies both our ambitions to challenge the wider design industry to reconsider the materials we use. From creating runway collections to the interiors of cars, we have a shared responsibility to find sustainable material alternatives.” + Volvo Cars and Phillip Lim   Images via Volvo Cars and Phillip Lim

Read more: 
Volvo teams up with Phillip Lim on sustainable weekender bag

Innovative biophilic design planned for new village in Portugal

October 18, 2021 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Innovative biophilic design planned for new village in Portugal

A new development is in the works, designed to sit on a Portuguese hillside and provide a community with unique characteristics and a focus on sustainable design, function, well-being and innovation. The project is dubbed Fuse Valley. It’s a collaboration between Farfetch, the leading global technology platform for luxury fashion , and Portuguese real estate developer Castro Group. The duo brought in notable sustainability-focused architectural firm Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) to design the plan for the site. Related: The High Performance Surfing Center honors nature inside and out Located along the slopes of the Leça River in Porto, the site was chosen for its proximity to convenient transportation and the river. The overall blueprint of Fuse Valley will include 24 buildings for a mixture of tech companies, a hotel , small start-ups, and services. Farfetch HQ will encompass 12 interconnected buildings that open the doors to creativity and idea exchange between employees and visitors. “The individual buildings that constitute the various elements of the organization are connected to form large contiguous work environments – physically consolidated, but spatially varied to create a human-scale experience,“ said João Albuquerque, Partner in Charge at BIG . The BIG design places the buildings around plazas, parks and courtyards meant to blur the lines between the outdoors and indoor spaces while promoting a healthy work and community  environment . The Farfetch buildings include lobbies, an academy, an auditorium, a canteen and wellness facilities that flow together as an extension of the surrounding hillside and emphasize biophilic design throughout the spaces. The location and the focus on health are seen through the plans to cater to mobility to, from, and onsite with electric vehicle charging stations and infrastructure to support the use of bicycles and electric scooters. Fuse Valley will also connect to the main public transport via shuttles. According to Paulo Castro, CEO of Castro Group, “Fuse Valley is the perfect interpretation of our golden rule, applied to all our projects: location, innovation, sustainability, and technology . What we are going to do in Matosinhos is something unique and that puts this space on the international map of what is best done both in terms of sustainability and in terms of innovation. With this project, we intend to develop a smart city, or in this case, a smart valley.” In both construction and scheduled use of the buildings, Farfetch and Fuse Valley are leaning into  green building practices  and low environmental impact with the hope of being one of the most sustainable building developments in Portugal and Europe. Fuse Valley is scheduled to break ground by early 2023 and open its doors in 2025. + Farfetch Via BIG – Bjarke Ingels Group Visualizations by Lucian R, courtesy of BIG – Bjarke Ingels Group

Go here to read the rest: 
Innovative biophilic design planned for new village in Portugal

The International Garden Festival presents new 2021 installations

August 23, 2021 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on The International Garden Festival presents new 2021 installations

Magic lies outside  is the theme of the annual International Garden Festival, which aims to “bring us hope, to exalt creativity and to add colour to this world that is struggling to overcome this global pandemic and to come out of several months of confinement.” Now in its 22nd year, the 2021 edition at Reford Gardens in Quebec , Canada features five new installations, submitted from Canada, the United States, France and Sweden. These additions extend the current gardens, creating an outdoor museum of art. Related: Casa CBC incorporates greenery at every level   Choose Your Own Adventure Balmori Associates from New York present this work, inspired by the effects of global warming . The fight against climate change, coupled with the impact of the pandemic, drove the team to rethink the human/nature connection.  This contemplation is represented in simple lines of  plants  crisscrossing with hard materials. The message simplifies our relationship with the soil, water, air, plants and animals. Choose Your Own Adventure sets out to encourage visitors to feel the hot ground underfoot, smell the moisture or dryness in the air and hear the crunch of gravel as they walk. Hässja Architect Emil Bäckström from Stockholm, Sweden presents Hässja, a traditional hay-drying technique that offers shelter and a connection to nature. Each of the three structures is made up of millions of pieces of straw, transforming a once-living grass into a cozy and protected space for contemplating the resurgent need to intermingle human needs with those of nature. A press release explains the installation by saying, “The covid-19 pandemic has taught us a lot. It has exposed a disconnection from nature, agriculture and the importance of biodiversity . All around the globe, a regained interest in traditional, sustainable ways of inhabiting the earth is emerging.” Miroirs Acoustiques Presented by landscape architects Emmanuelle Loslier and Camille Zaroubi from Montreal (Quebec) Canada , Miroirs Acoustiques gives visitors the chance to experience sound in a newly presented way. Inspired by sound mirrors used across the coast of Great Britain during WWI to detect approaching enemy aircraft, the installation allows sounds to bounce and focus, amplifying them via two parabolic reflectors ( recycled  aluminum antennas) planted in the ground. Open Space A team of architectural interns for Quebec, Canada (Gabriel Lemelin, Francis Gaignard, Sandrine Gaulin) delivers an open space in the outdoors . The premise is a completely unboxed house, loaded with endless possibilities. It not only provides an open space but a way for the mind to openly roam with new consideration for the doors, staircases, windows and walls around us every day. Porte-bonheur David Bonnard, DE-HMONP architect, Laura Giuliani, landscaper, and Amélie Viale, visual artist, represent Lyon, Villefranche-sur-Saône and Lissieu, France with Porte-bonheur, an installation about reopening the doors firmly shut during the pandemic lockdowns. “Porte Bonheur is a rite of passage between reality and potentiality. The installation invites visitors to dare to throw open the door, cross thresholds, go outside and explore their surroundings with all the wonder of a small child.” The Reford Gardens will be open daily from May 29 to October 3, 2021, in addition to being accessible to members in the low season. + Jardins de Métis Images via JC Lemay, Martin Bond, Nancy Guignard and Antoine Proulx

Read the rest here: 
The International Garden Festival presents new 2021 installations

Plantagon’s crowdfunded plantscraper aims to produce 500 metric tons of food a year

November 3, 2017 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Plantagon’s crowdfunded plantscraper aims to produce 500 metric tons of food a year

Swedish company Plantagon believes that ‘plantscrapers’ are the way of the future—and part of solution to the global food crisis. Part urban farm, part skyscraper, these vertical greenhouses could provide large-scale organic food production in cities, with a much smaller energy and carbon footprint than industrial agriculture. After years of research and development, Plantagon is now ready to embark on their first landmark plantscraper, called The World Food Building, and is crowdfunding their way to success . A pioneer in the fields of urban agriculture and food technology, Plantagon has set their sights on solving the food crisis as cities grow larger and arable land shrinks. Thus, the company created The World Food Building, a 60-meter-tall vertical farm and 16-story office building proposed for Linköping, Sweden that, if built, would serve as an international model for vertical industrial urban farming. The innovative ‘plantscraper’ would use Plantagon’s patented technology to produce 500 metric tons of organic food annually in a closed, clean, and climate-controlled environment. At least half of the energy used in food production would be recaptured and reused as floor heat in the office building. Plantagon estimates that The World Food Building could save 1,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions and 50 million liters of water as compared to traditional industrial farming systems. To turn their first plantscraper into reality, Plantagon has turned to crowdfunding and asked the community to join them as allies. “We are reaching out to people everywhere who feel that commercial organizations should also be the driving force of change,” said Hans Hassle, Plantagon’s Co-founder and Secretary-General. “People are sick and tired of businesses being shortsighted and just-for-profit driven. We believe it’s time for this to change and the time for ‘business as usual’ is over. With potentially 100,000 allies all over the world supporting Plantagon, we will show that the power of the crowd gets the job done.” + Plantagon

The rest is here:
Plantagon’s crowdfunded plantscraper aims to produce 500 metric tons of food a year

Floating sauna with charred timber cladding boasts minimal site impact

October 27, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Floating sauna with charred timber cladding boasts minimal site impact

When Milan-based Small Architecture Workshop was asked to design a tiny sauna for a bed and breakfast in Åmot, Sweden, they wanted to do so with minimal environmental impact. The result of their efforts is this dreamy floating sauna on a lake wrapped in blackened timber to blend in with its forested surroundings. The architects built the compact structure in the span of two weeks as the first in a series of new amenities for the nearby bed and breakfast set in the middle of the forest. Located a three-hour drive from Stockholm , the bed and breakfast and accompanying sauna are an idyllic nature retreat for city dwellers. To minimize site impact , Small Architecture Workshop built the sauna on an existing wooden pier that they fixed up, thus avoiding digging and damaging the shoreline. The traditional Japanese technique of Yakisugi—more popularly known as Shou Sugi Ban—was applied to the sauna’s exterior cladding to make the timber resistant to weather, rot, and bugs. Related: Gigantic golden egg sauna warms up residents of Sweden’s northernmost town In contrast to the dark facade, the sauna is lined with light-colored alder wood. Visitors access the sauna through a covered space that serves as a dressing room and firewood storage room. Full-height glazing fronts the sauna, which can comfortably accommodate eight, to frame unobstructed views of the lake. + Small Architecture Workshop Via Dezeen Images via Small Architecture Workshop

Read the original: 
Floating sauna with charred timber cladding boasts minimal site impact

Floating sauna with charred timber cladding boasts minimal site impact

October 27, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Floating sauna with charred timber cladding boasts minimal site impact

When Milan-based Small Architecture Workshop was asked to design a tiny sauna for a bed and breakfast in Åmot, Sweden, they wanted to do so with minimal environmental impact. The result of their efforts is this dreamy floating sauna on a lake wrapped in blackened timber to blend in with its forested surroundings. The architects built the compact structure in the span of two weeks as the first in a series of new amenities for the nearby bed and breakfast set in the middle of the forest. Located a three-hour drive from Stockholm , the bed and breakfast and accompanying sauna are an idyllic nature retreat for city dwellers. To minimize site impact , Small Architecture Workshop built the sauna on an existing wooden pier that they fixed up, thus avoiding digging and damaging the shoreline. The traditional Japanese technique of Yakisugi—more popularly known as Shou Sugi Ban—was applied to the sauna’s exterior cladding to make the timber resistant to weather, rot, and bugs. Related: Gigantic golden egg sauna warms up residents of Sweden’s northernmost town In contrast to the dark facade, the sauna is lined with light-colored alder wood. Visitors access the sauna through a covered space that serves as a dressing room and firewood storage room. Full-height glazing fronts the sauna, which can comfortably accommodate eight, to frame unobstructed views of the lake. + Small Architecture Workshop Via Dezeen Images via Small Architecture Workshop

Read more:
Floating sauna with charred timber cladding boasts minimal site impact

Floating sauna with charred timber cladding boasts minimal site impact

October 27, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Floating sauna with charred timber cladding boasts minimal site impact

When Milan-based Small Architecture Workshop was asked to design a tiny sauna for a bed and breakfast in Åmot, Sweden, they wanted to do so with minimal environmental impact. The result of their efforts is this dreamy floating sauna on a lake wrapped in blackened timber to blend in with its forested surroundings. The architects built the compact structure in the span of two weeks as the first in a series of new amenities for the nearby bed and breakfast set in the middle of the forest. Located a three-hour drive from Stockholm , the bed and breakfast and accompanying sauna are an idyllic nature retreat for city dwellers. To minimize site impact , Small Architecture Workshop built the sauna on an existing wooden pier that they fixed up, thus avoiding digging and damaging the shoreline. The traditional Japanese technique of Yakisugi—more popularly known as Shou Sugi Ban—was applied to the sauna’s exterior cladding to make the timber resistant to weather, rot, and bugs. Related: Gigantic golden egg sauna warms up residents of Sweden’s northernmost town In contrast to the dark facade, the sauna is lined with light-colored alder wood. Visitors access the sauna through a covered space that serves as a dressing room and firewood storage room. Full-height glazing fronts the sauna, which can comfortably accommodate eight, to frame unobstructed views of the lake. + Small Architecture Workshop Via Dezeen Images via Small Architecture Workshop

See the original post here: 
Floating sauna with charred timber cladding boasts minimal site impact

This new energy concept from Sweden can make any building net zero

October 11, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on This new energy concept from Sweden can make any building net zero

A new Swedish energy concept can turn any building into a net zero energy structure. Pioneered by Malmö-based company Innenco , the concept utilizes a building’s thermal mass to drastically reduce energy use by around 85 percent. With their active elements systems, heat pumps, chillers, and adding solar panels , Innenco can bring new or existing buildings to net zero energy consumption. Inhabitat spoke with CEO and founder Jonathan Karlsson to find out more. Innenco, which stands for innovative energy concept, dramatically slashes a building’s energy use. Karlsson told Inhabitat, “Our vision is to create possibilities to make new net zero constructions in an efficient way, giving everyone the capability to do so.” Their technology changes how a building operates for vastly improved energy efficiency . Related: California city could become the first Zero Net Energy city in the U.S. It starts with their active elements system: pipes are integrated into the frame construction to utilize a building’s thermal mass. Adding heat pumps and chillers to the system allows Innenco to get four to six times greater efficiency in heating and cooling . At this point they’re able to reduce energy use by 85 percent, so to cover that last 15 percent, they install Innenco Quantum Solar panels. “This makes an investment in solar cells much lower than a traditional system, and we can get net zero for a really cost-efficient investment,” Karlsson told Inhabitat. Buildings with the Innenco system installed tend to maintain a temperature of around 22 degrees Celsius, or around 72 degrees Fahrenheit. Innenco has already seen their concept work in the real world. They’ve installed their system in homes, offices, schools, and industry premises. Karlsson said they were excited to discover they could utilize a really high rate of thermal mass in industry buildings, and think their concept could translate well to skyscrapers . They’ve worked in Sweden, the Czech Republic, Spain, and the Netherlands, with projects coming up in Turkey and the United Arab Emirates. They provide maintenance, and their energy concept can be installed as new buildings are built or integrated in old ones. Karlsson said sustainability projects should deliver social, environmental, and economical benefits, all three of which Innenco aims to offer with their concept. “Reducing carbon dioxide emissions is a really high goal for us,” Karlsson told Inhabitat. “It’s the climate condition; it’s really necessary to figure out how we can help the planet.” Innenco hopes to introduce their energy concept to other markets too, such as the United States. You can find out more on their website . + Innenco Images courtesy of Innenco

Go here to read the rest: 
This new energy concept from Sweden can make any building net zero

Folkets House pavilion is an inclusive space where refugees can learn skills and find jobs

October 10, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Folkets House pavilion is an inclusive space where refugees can learn skills and find jobs

This palm-shaped temporary pavilion recently popped up at the Enskifteshagen Park in Malmö, Sweden , as an inclusive space where refugees and longtime residents of Sweden can learn new skills, find jobs and make connections. The pavilion, named Folkets House (“People’s House), was designed for the Opportunity Space Festival in Malmö, as the winning proposal for the design competition organized by the Van Alen Institute , the City of Malmö, White Arkitekter , Skanska , Individuell Människohjälp , and Architects Sweden. Architects and designers Rik Ekströmof ARExA,  Gustav Fagerström of Walter P Moore,  Milad Barosen of the Milou Group and Nathan King of the Virginia Tech School of Architecture + Design teamed up to design the structure, which was influenced by Swedish 19th-century labor union buildings. Related: Beautiful timber pavilion unfolds like origami The pop-up structure is shaped by curved wooden beams that radiate from its center and shelter a large space under a thin skin. It is meant to host a range of programs, workshops, and other activities organized by Van Alen Institute. At night, the building is transformed into a beautifully lit gathering space where refugees and immigrants can mingle with locals. “We believe that Folkets House will signal the beginning of new opportunities and inspiration for working people of all nations who come together in Malmö — Sweden’s cultural melting pot,” said Rik Ekström of the Folkets House team. + ARExA + Walter P Moore + Milou Group + VT a+d + Van Alen Institute Lead photo by Nazim Benli

View original post here: 
Folkets House pavilion is an inclusive space where refugees can learn skills and find jobs

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 6694 access attempts in the last 7 days.