Tiny indoor vertical garden grows micro-veggies on its own in 10 days

March 23, 2017 by  
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You don’t need green thumbs to grow microgreens with this EcoQube Frame. The tiny indoor vertical garden grows micro-veggies in 10 days with only fertilized water, doing all the work for you. Compact and low-maintenance, the design is suited for apartments, homes and offices of all sizes, and allows you to grow nutritious food sources quickly, without worrying about watering and feeding your plants . Aqua Design Innovations (ADI) launched EcoQube Frame on Kickstarter , and it has been a smashing success. The group tripled their goal and raised over $30,000 in the first 40 minutes of crowdfunding. Learn more about this amazing design after the break. The EcoQube Frame contains two sections with one plant pad for each section; each plant pad has hundreds of small pockets that hold seeds in place so that plants can sprout evenly. The reservoir below contains fertilized water that provides all the necessary nutrients for successful germination. “It’s really the simplest, easiest and most compact way to grow indoor plants vertically without soil,” said the designers. “It’s also great for those who don’t feel like they have a green thumb. Since the reservoir waters the plants automatically, you don’t have to worry about over watering or root rot – which is a common problem when growing plants or micro-veggies.” Related: Smart Taiga Tower is like having an 80 square foot garden right inside your home EcoQube’s seed pads are all made from natural, 100 percent compostable fibers, and provide just enough water to allow the plants to grow. The designers claim that EcoQube can grow up to $25 worth of micro-veggies in a little over a week, and pays for itself after only one month of growing. + EcoQube Frame Kickstarter + Aqua Design Innovations (ADI)

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Tiny indoor vertical garden grows micro-veggies on its own in 10 days

The SDGs: How can we sustain our optimism?

March 2, 2017 by  
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The email came from an 82-year-old activist in Vermont. She was hoping for answers to questions she was hearing from others, about the U.N.’s Sustainable Development Goals. She wanted to write an article — not for The New York Times or even for a local newspaper, but for her friends, neighbors and the various experts she meets and talks to.She wanted to be able to explain some basic things about the SDGs, to people who often seem skeptical.

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The SDGs: How can we sustain our optimism?

On Harmony and Hope

February 23, 2017 by  
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The universal adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals by all the world’s nations marked a huge global milestone, something that many thousands of people had been working to achieve, over many years. This momentous breakthrough sparked AtKisson President and CEO Alan AtKisson to pen a song and spark a global movement, imbuing music, dance and simple human happiness into sustainable development and create our best hope for a bright future.

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On Harmony and Hope

Inside the Climate Justice Movement

February 23, 2017 by  
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Sierra Club Executive Director Michael Brune addresses the importance of climate action at every scale in the public and private sector, from global agreements to city pilot programs, from startups to multinational corporations.

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Inside the Climate Justice Movement

SPACE10 creates an open-source Growroom you can build at home

February 17, 2017 by  
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SPACE10, a future-living lab and exhibition space in Copenhagen, wants to change the modern food industry. In September, we shared news of the group’s Growroom – a spherical farm pod that lets you grow food just about anywhere. Now SPACE10 wants people to build their own Growroom right at home with open-source plans for the ingenious design. Grab some plywood and a rubber hammer and get ready to grow. The Growroom spherical garden helps to “empower people to grow their own food much more locally in a beautiful and sustainable way,” according to SPACE10. Last year, people across the globe, from Taipei to Helsinki, expressed interest in getting their own Growroom, but the group didn’t want to create a new way to grow local food just to manufacture and ship the pod across entire oceans. So they decided to make the concept completely free for people to build on their own. Related: The Growroom is a spherical farm pod that brings agriculture to city streets Although the Growroom has a tiny footprint, it is capable of growing substantial quantities of food in a small space. It is open in the center, so you can step inside and immerse yourself in nature even in the middle of the city. Not to mention food is more nutritious and tasty when picked and eaten fresh . The design was created by architects Mads-Ulrik Husum and Sine Lindholm. It requires 17 steps, 17 pieces of plywood, a rubber hammer, and some screws; you will also need access to a CNC milling machine or laser cutter – your local fab lab or maker space should be able to get you up and running. If you decide to make one of your own, be sure to let us know , and give a shoutout to @space10_journal on Instagram – we can’t wait to see what you come up with. + Growroom plans + Space10 Images via Alona Vibe , Rasmus Hjortshøj , Niklas Vindelev and Space10

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SPACE10 creates an open-source Growroom you can build at home

Architects of France’s first passive house unveil latest extraordinary design

February 13, 2017 by  
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From the architects who created France’s first passive house comes another wonder of green design located just outside of Paris. Karawitz Architects have just finished work on the Marly House, a large family passive home designed to “live openly” within the community. The unique aesthetic of the structure is meant to “awaken the curiosity of the passers-by”. The extreme gabled roof pays homage to the traditional vernacular of the French community, but its pre-greyed larch cladding (CLT prefabricated) gives the home a strong contemporary feel. Related One of France’s First Passivhaus is a Wonder of Green Design The home was built on an incline, which from a certain angle, gives off the impression that the structure is levitating above ground. A perforated galvanized-steel fence allows for some privacy without closing off communication entirely with the community. On the interior, the architects went with a minimalist touch for the large 145-square-meter space. Raw materials such as steel and concrete were left exposed to create a sense of airiness. A large central fireplace is at the heart of the interior and is the only active heating system in the passive home . The bedrooms on the top floor have large windows that were installed almost at ceiling height, protecting the privacy of the homeowners while providing natural light into the interior. Although the interior may seem a bit cold at first glance, warm touches like colorful furniture and a playful childrens room with a climbing ladder add a sense of whimsy to the design + Karawitz Architects Photographs by Schnepp Renou  

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Architects of France’s first passive house unveil latest extraordinary design

Japanese train station built around massive 700 year-old camphor tree

February 1, 2017 by  
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The Japanese reverence for nature has been well established, especially in the world of design. However, if anyone still has doubts, they should take a stroll through the Kayashima train station in Neyagawa, a northeastern suburb of Osaka. The train station was carefully constructed around a massive camphor tree that has stood on the site for 700 years. The Kayashima Station opened in 1910 and was built next to the large tree , whose exact age goes back before local records. As the local population began to grow, it became clear that the station would need to be upgraded. In 1972, plans were approved to expand the site and, according to Spoon and Tamago , those plans called for the tree to be cut down to make space. Related: Mecanoo designs gorgeous green-roofed train station for Kaohsiung Although the history of the train station’s upgrades is a matter of records, there are multiple stories behind the tree’s intact presence today. Some say that it was indeed the Japanese respect for nature that saved the tree from being chopped down . Yet, others say it was nothing more than pure superstition. Apparently, the tree had long been associated with a local shrine and deity, and its impending demise caused quite the uproar by the local community. Stories began to swirl that the tree was also angry and would curse anyone that dared to cut it down with bad luck. Whatever the case, station officials were persuaded to keep the tree, and ended up incorporating it into a new elevated platform . The construction was completed in 1980, and features a large hole cut into the roof of the platform where the tree majestically sticks out over the roof. Just to be on the safe side, the officials surrounded the base of the tree with a small shrine. Via Oddity Central Lead photo via Kosaku Mimura/Nikkei . Additional photography via Studio Ohana.

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Japanese train station built around massive 700 year-old camphor tree

Take refuge in this off-grid bungalow tucked into the lush Mexican forest

January 23, 2017 by  
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If you’re looking for a stunning off-grid escape, Cadaval & Solà-Morales architects are creating a lovely remote paradise in the quiet town of Tepoztlán, about 50 km outside of Mexico City. The international firm has just unveiled LMM Bungalow, a compact hut strategically tucked into the lush forest overlooking the valley. Visitors to the minimalistic refuge will be able to enjoy the serene environment along with a relaxing lounge area and pool, also designed by the Spanish architects. The modernistic hut is designed to be a relaxing sojourn for anyone wanting to escape the hustle and bustle of Mexico DF.  The small structure is built into a concrete base tucked into the steep slope of the terrain. Open air platforms extend from the interior space through floor-to-ceiling glass doors, creating a seamless connection from the interior to the exterior. The structure is painted a matte black to minimize its visual impact on the surrounding green landscape. Related: Rescued 1927 Austin bungalow gets new life as a sweet new solar-powered home To create a division between the interior spaces, the architects choose to break the rectangular volume by “folding” the exterior glass wall inwards. This technique physically separates the living area from the master bedroom, without forsaking the natural light that floods both of spaces. Along with creating extra privacy, vegetation is allowed to grow in the open space, further fusing the natural surroundings into the interior. + Cadaval & Solà-Morales Via Architonic Photography by Diego Berruecos  

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Take refuge in this off-grid bungalow tucked into the lush Mexican forest

6 Super common food additives that you need to avoid

January 14, 2017 by  
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It’s difficult for even the most dedicated person to make all of the daily meals from scratch and that often means relying on store-bought foods for condiments and other must-have kitchen items. But lurking in those kitchen staples are some food additives that can wreak havoc with the human body. Even worse, some of these pesky additives are hard to avoid because they are used in so many foods. Learn where they are hiding and how to avoid them with this handy guide.

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6 Super common food additives that you need to avoid

From the Capitol to a garden market, planting a ‘climate change agent’

January 13, 2017 by  
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How can mission-oriented companies nourish food systems and local economies? Former lawyer Danielle Vogel shares secrets from a career shift.

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From the Capitol to a garden market, planting a ‘climate change agent’

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