Designers made this pavilion out of upcycled paper waste

October 14, 2019 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Originally created for the Copenhagen Art Fair to showcase a new sustainable method of design, the Paper Pavilion is made out of upcycled paper collected from the city itself. The art fair, in its fifth season, had a specific focus on pavilion designs that spotlighted sustainable construction , urbanization and recycling.  The pavilion was created by Denmark-based Japanese architects, PAN- PROJECTS. The architects wanted to combine sustainability with the appropriate amount of durability for their Paper Pavilion design, making sure to sacrifice the longevity of the structure whenever possible for the utilization of the materials that would only withstand through the duration of the three-day event. With this methodology in mind, PAN- PROJECTS decided to use paper as their primary building material due to its strength and recyclability . Additionally, the use of paper adds a certain aspect of uniqueness that sets the Paper Pavilion apart from similar projects at the Copenhagen Art Fair. Related: Mud and recycled materials make up this sustainable Kerala home The designers also took inspiration from the shape of a bagworm moth for the pavilion, taking into account especially the insect’s nesting habits of collecting local materials into a particular shape. The concept will hopefully encourage spectators to find a connection between the natural shape of the moth-inspired design to the urban environment that surrounds it. Moreover, the papers that helped create the paper pavilion were collected from around the city, so the connection between the city’s inhabitants to the artistic structure should provide additional insight. Following the Copenhagen Art Fair, the piece was relocated permanently to the entrance hall inside the Kunsthal Charlottenborg Museum in Copenhagen with slight redesign to fit the new location. The paper used in the piece can be recycled again after the structure comes down, as well. + Pan- Projects Via Archdaily Images via Pan- Projects

Read more here:
Designers made this pavilion out of upcycled paper waste

Celebrate the second International E-Waste Day

October 14, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Thanks to its inaugural success last year, the second International E-Waste Day will be observed on October 14, 2019. The day is meant to raise awareness for proper disposal of electrical equipment and electronic devices worldwide. The International E-Waste Day was developed by Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) Forum to promote reuse and recycle practices. Consumers are encouraged to proactively increase rates of repairing appliances for recovery and reuse, recycling devices and properly disposing of electronics . Related: Lawmakers are pushing gadget manufacturers with the Right to Repair movement Consumption of computers, phones, other digital devices and household appliances continues to grow rapidly. Often replaced and discarded, this electronic waste, or e-waste, is a big problem for the planet. Ecological repercussions accompany the heightened demand for electronics. Producing this technology exacerbates mining and depleting natural reserves to procure raw materials. E-waste accumulates, threatening the environment with toxic pollution and contamination hazards. The mess can only be alleviated with plans that enable reuse, repair, resale and recycle initiatives. Global estimates project 50 million tons of e-waste will be generated this year. But only a fifth of that will be recycled, while the rest is placed in landfills, burned or illegally treated. Consequences include tremendous losses to valuable supply chain materials. Moreover, negative health, environmental and societal issues arise from irresponsible e-waste management . Collectively, the WEEE Forum implements high-quality standards for e-waste “collection, handling, storage, transport, preparation for reuse, processing and disposal.” Its proprietary software allows member groups and partners to document recycling and recovery quotas to benchmark operations. Similarly, the nonprofit has provided policy recommendations for improved optimization across its member groups. This year, the International Telecommunications Union, a United Nations agency, is partnering with WEEE Forum to ensure global reach. More than 100 member organizations across 40 countries worldwide are expected to join in on activities as part of the second International E-Waste Day. Pascal Leroy, director general of the WEEE Forum, said, “There are many countries worldwide that are currently in the process of implementing e-waste legislation. We are therefore very pleased to have participants from six continents involved in this year’s International E-Waste Day.” Established in 2002, WEEE Forum addresses broadscale e-waste management. The nonprofit is the largest multinational organization harmonizing exchanges of best practices and knowledge on e-waste operations (collection, logistics and processing). To date, the WEEE Forum encompasses 36 producer responsibility groups from 25 countries. Representing the United States, at the moment, are Tennessee’s TERRA (The Electronics Reuse & Recycling Alliance) and Michigan’s VCER (Valley City Electronics Recycling). Whether you repair, reuse , resale, recycle or just spread the word this International E-Waste Day, don’t forget to do your part for the planet. + WEEE Forum Image via Volker Glätsch

View post:
Celebrate the second International E-Waste Day

Stunning green-roofed home in Poland is embedded into the idyllic landscape

October 14, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Lush green rooftops are becoming more and more common within the architectural world, but this gorgeous house in a remote area of Poland is truly an example of next level green goodness. Designed by architect Przemek Olczyk from Mobius Architekci , the Green Line is a stunning family home that has been almost entirely tucked into its landscape and covered with a thick layer of greenery. Located in the remote region of Warmia, in northern Poland, the 5,380 square-foot family home sits on an expansive landscape of rolling hills covered in wildflowers. The idyllic setting inspired the architect to create a home with a lush green roof and unique architectural form that follows the silhouette of the surrounding landscape. Related: Rural Italian home clad in lush greenery blends into its idyllic surroundings Hence, the Green Line home is embedded into the terrain, only leaving its pitched roof to jut upwards from the ground level. In addition to creating a beautiful home design that is respectful to its topography, the home’s unique design also pays homage to the vernacular found in the region. The gabled peaks of the roof , for example, are made out of wooden lamella detail, a nod to the traditional cottages found in the area, which often have decorated wooden boards arranged in various patterns. Another nod to the local traditions is the home’s unique L-shaped layout, which was inspired by the local farms in the area. However, more than just eye-pleasing aesthetics, the home’s many vernacular features pull double duty as sustainable passive tactics to reduce the home’s energy use. Just by embedding the home into the landscape increases the design’s thermal mass, reducing the need for air conditioning in the hot summer months or heat in the frigid cold winters. Additionally, the high pitched roof creates a light-filled double height space on the interior, opening up space for natural air circulation as well. The L-shaped design also helps protect the home from the heavy winds that kick up often due to the home’s proximity to a large lake. Although the home sits just slightly above the ground level, some strategic design savvy helped create a light-filled interior. Following the topography, the home’s main living area sits adjacent to a slight incline. Floor-to-ceiling glass walls allow for stunning views of the surroundings, as well as flood the living space with natural light . The home’s unique layout was also strategic to creating a comfortable living space. Within the layout, a large open-air courtyard was created to provide the family with plenty of space to entertain, dine and play. + Mobius Architekci Via Dwell Photography by Pawe? Ulatowski

Originally posted here: 
Stunning green-roofed home in Poland is embedded into the idyllic landscape

Repurposed coffee grounds provide sustainable clothing pigment alternative

September 27, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Repurposed coffee grounds provide sustainable clothing pigment alternative

Scientists from Iowa State University (ISU) recently unveiled a natural alternative to synthetic clothing pigment. This natural alternative is sourced from brewed coffee grounds. The research team , spearheaded by ISU Assistant Professor Chunhui Xiang and graduate student Changhyun “Lyon” Nam, found a possible alternative via repurposed coffee grounds. Rather than adding to landfill density and single-use waste, brewed coffee grounds can instead be transformed into another high-value resource. Related: Blue dye could be the next key to harnessing renewable energy Brewed coffee grounds are feasible because 100 million Americans drink coffee daily, meaning there is an adequate supply of coffee grounds that can be upcycled and diverted away from landfills. Shades of brown can be extracted from the coffee grounds, then bound to various textiles and fabrics. Of course, there remain the quandaries of fading and of replicating consistent hues. While the use of pigment fixative helps to bind the color to the fabric and reduce fading, producing consistent hues that can match a template proves to be more complex. More research is required before repurposed coffee grounds can be ready for mass-production of pigments.  “One disadvantage is that it’s hard to measure the quantity needed to get the same color,” Xiang explained. “There may be a difference in the type of beans, or maybe the coffee was brewed twice. Creating an exact match is a challenge, especially for manufacturers.” However, Xiang asserted that hue consistency can be overcome by changing consumer attitudes. If consumers are able to reframe their interests so that they accept the uniqueness of colors rather than demand their consistency, then repurposed coffee grounds, as a sustainable source, can be a worthwhile commercial venture. Historically, textile hues were originally sourced from plants and minerals.  But industrialization forced the textile sector to turn to synthetics, because laboratories could produce them at cheaper cost. Over time, these synthetics have become less and less environmentally friendly. Because the textile industry utilizes upward of 2 million tons of chemicals for its synthetic pigments, there has been a growing movement in today’s society to find more sustainable sources, such as repurposed coffee grounds. + Taylor and Francis Online Via Phys.org Image via Couleur

Original post: 
Repurposed coffee grounds provide sustainable clothing pigment alternative

Can an artificial leaf make the pharmaceutical industry greener?

September 11, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Can an artificial leaf make the pharmaceutical industry greener?

Scientists in the Netherlands have developed a solar reactor that looks and acts like a leaf. By putting chemicals in the artificial leaf’s microchannels, which resemble the veins on a real leaf, and exposing it to sunlight cause solar reactions to create medicine . “Depending on the choice of chemicals, almost any kind of medicine can be created in a fast and sustainable way,” promises a video on the Eindhoven University of Technology’s website . “Maybe we could be making malaria medication in the middle of a rainforest . Or even a headache pill in outer space.” Related: Supermarket happy hour reduces food waste Researchers at Eindhoven University mimicked nature by designing ultra-thin channels running through the faux leaves, which are made of Plexiglas. “This material is cheaper and easy to make in larger quantities,” says Timothy Noël, lead researcher on the team. “It also has a higher refractive index, so that the light stays better confined. But the most important thing is that we can add more types of light-sensitive molecules in (Plexiglas). As a result, in principle all chemical reactions are now possible in this reactor across the entire width of the visible light spectrum.” The current version of the artificial leaf is a refinement of a prototype Noël unveiled in 2016. So far, the scientists have produced two drugs inside the artificial leaves: the anti- malarial artimensinin and ascaridole, which fights parasitic worms. “Artificial leaves are perfectly scalable; where there is sun, it works,” says Noël. “The reactors can be easily scaled, and its inexpensive and self-powered nature make them ideally suited for the cost-effective production of chemicals with solar light. I am therefore very positive that we should be able to run a commercial trial of this technology within a year.” If future trials are successful, this small reactor could help solve the pharmaceutical industry’s sustainability problems. Producing and transporting drugs currently requires dangerous chemicals and a lot of fossil fuels. Via New Atlas Image via TU/e

More: 
Can an artificial leaf make the pharmaceutical industry greener?

This rechargeable camping headlamp is made out of sustainable wood and recycled aluminum

September 10, 2019 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on This rechargeable camping headlamp is made out of sustainable wood and recycled aluminum

Most adventurers do what they can to leave no trace when exploring, but sometimes it is nearly impossible to find sustainable hiking gear. In fact, the search for green gear got so frustrating for nature lover Doug Rieck that he invented his own camping headlamp that is made out of sustainable wood and recyclable aluminum. Recently launched on Kickstarter, the Origin Headlamp is not only a sustainable lamp, but it also boasts a powerful 300 lumen LED light that offers at least 10 hours of light and is guaranteed to lead you straight through your epic adventures. Doug Rieck is the founder of Eukarya , an outdoor goods company that designs sustainable gear. Its products are made without chemically engineered plastics and synthetic materials that have been the standard in the outdoor industry. Related: Get ready for an adventure with this ultimate checklist of backpacking essentials Handcrafted from sustainable wood and recycled aluminum, the Origin Headlamp is a durable, reliable light for adventures. With a 300 lumen LED light , the headlamp features a rechargeable battery that guarantees 10+ hours of light. Adding to its convenient features, the battery fully recharges in two hours. Additionally, the headlamp is incredibly useful in distinct settings, because it offers high/low and strobe modes. Of course, nobody wants to be lugging around a heavy light in their camping gear , so it is a good thing that the headlamp only weighs an astonishing 85 grams — substantially less than most standard headlamps. In addition to finally offering nature lovers a variety of green options for their camping and adventure equipment, the company also gives back to the planet. According to the current Kickstarter campaign , Eukarya is promising to plant a tree for each pledge the headlamp receives in collaboration with One Tree Planted . The headlamp has limited availability to early birds for just $99 with a December 2019 delivery or is available for regular pre-order for a March 2020 delivery. + Origin Headlamp Images via Eukarya

See more here:
This rechargeable camping headlamp is made out of sustainable wood and recycled aluminum

Sustainable toiletries packaged in soap aim to eliminate single-use plastics

July 15, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Sustainable toiletries packaged in soap aim to eliminate single-use plastics

Single-use plastic may be the biggest issue of our time, but admittedly, it’s sometimes an uphill battle to find alternatives. But now, when it comes to finding sustainable toiletries, there’s a eco-friendly option. Already well-known for innovative and sustainable designs, Mi Zhou has just unveiled Soapack, a collection of sustainable shampoo packaging made out of soap. Personal care products often come in mass-produced plastic containers that have a fairly short lifespan, requiring multiple purchases throughout the year. From face lotions to hair gels and everything in between, we are constantly suffocating the planet with a shocking abundance of plastic waste , especially considering that the standard plastic bottle can take up to 450 years to break down . Related: The Refill Shoppe enforces zero-waste packaging, provides bulk refills for household and beauty products Thankfully, there is a new green option for shampoo users that not only helps reduce waste but adds a touch of sustainable luxury to your toiletries. Soapack is a collection of shampoo bottles that are cast from soap that melts away after they are completely used. Each Soapack bottle is made out of a vegetable oil-based soap that is dyed with mineral pigments, plants and flowers. Similar to the process of making ceramic containers, the mixture is poured into molds of various shapes. The bottles are then lined with a thin layer of beeswax to make them waterproof and prevent the liquid contents from completely dissolving when in contact with water. The best place to store the bottles is on a soap dish, so that they can slowly melt away without making a mess, eventually disappearing after use instead of leaving behind another discarded bottle in the trash . The design was inspired by antique perfume bottles — opaque shells with light pastel hues and delicate, shapely curves. Although they are designed to melt away, if kept dry, the sustainable soap bottles can even be used as a decorative feature. With the innovative packaging design , Zhou hopes to revolutionize the packaging industry for the good of the planet. “Product packaging has always been thrown away, no matter how well-designed or what material it is made of,” Zhou explained. “I want to re-evaluate what packaging could be as well as help us to reduce our plastic footprint.” + Mi Zhou Design Images via Mi Zhou

Original post:
Sustainable toiletries packaged in soap aim to eliminate single-use plastics

Restored Bristol Hotel celebrates Appalachia

July 1, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Restored Bristol Hotel celebrates Appalachia

The Bristol, a newly opened boutique hotel that straddles the Virginia/Tennessee line, is a restored 1925 architectural landmark. Opened last October, the boutique hotel embraces both the musical and industrial roots of Appalachia. Visitors come to Bristol to explore the town known as the “Birthplace of Country Music.” Design elements in the 65-room property include exposed brick walls, a former hand-crank elevator on display and entryways resembling Roman arches. Visitors can join local herbalists for wildcrafting classes, or take a banjo lesson. Lumac, the hotel bar, offers panoramic views of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Vivian’s Table, the hotel restaurant, features scratch-made regional cuisine made with local ingredients. Other historic/ sustainable elements include a lobby front desk made of recycled glass and a hanging glass sculpture composed of vintage soda bottles. Related: Meet Maya Ka’an: Mexico’s newest ecotourism destination The Bristol’s Discarded Denim program celebrates the town’s rich denim history. Guests can leave their unwanted denim at checkout and the hotel will donate it to the local Valley Institute Elementary School for its annual recycled textiles fashion show. Any excess denim will be sent to  Blue Jeans Go Green . The town takes pride in its denim company, L.C. King Denim Manufacturing, the oldest cut and sew factory in the U.S. In the early 1900s, Landon Clayton King was raising champion bird dogs at his home in the Appalachian Mountains. He needed tougher clothes to withstand the demands of farming and hunting, which inspired the denim line in the factory he opened in 1913. Today, his great-grandson Jack King runs the company, which has partnered with the Bristol Hotel to provide many of the design elements. Hotel restaurant, Vivian’s Table, uses L.C. King’s striped cloth on its chair seats. Hotel guests can even book behind the scenes factory tours to learn about denim manufacturing. The Bristol’s denim recycling program is part of a much bigger movement. Since real denim is made mostly from cotton, it can be broken down and recycled into something new. Blue Jeans Go Green collects denim to upcycle into insulation . If you want to recycle your denim without going all the way to Bristol, Blue Jeans Go Green’s website lists drop off sites and ways to host your own collection party. + Bristol Images via Bristol Hotel

View original post here:
Restored Bristol Hotel celebrates Appalachia

Beautiful, solar-powered EV charging stations promise to charge a vehicle in 15 minutes

June 21, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Beautiful, solar-powered EV charging stations promise to charge a vehicle in 15 minutes

Copenhagen-based architectural firm COBE has just unveiled what are possibly the most beautiful and sustainable electric vehicle charging stations in the world. Built entirely from recyclable materials and powered by solar energy, these ultra-fast charging stations not only recharge a vehicle in just 15 minutes but also offer drivers a welcoming place to rest and relax. The first COBE-designed EV charging station was installed on the E20 motorway in the Danish city of Fredericia, with 47 more planned along Scandinavian highways: seven more in Denmark, 20 in Sweden and 20 in Norway. Created in partnership with Powered by E.ON Drive & Clever, the COBE-designed EV charging station consists of a series of “trees” made primarily from certified wood. The tree-inspired structures feature a canopy that provides shade and protection from the elements, while also providing space for a green roof and solar panels. The modular structures are scalable so that multiple “tree” structures can be combined into a “grove.” The Fredericia charging station features a “grove” of 12 “trees” with a 400-square-meter canopy. The Danish Society for Nature Conservation helped select the plantings that surround the charging station to enhance biodiversity and create a calming, “zen-like” atmosphere radically different from a traditional gas station setting. Related: World’s first electric road that charges moving vehicles debuts in Sweden “ Electric vehicles are the way of the future,” said Dan Stubbergaard, architect and founder of COBE. “With our design, we offer EV drivers a time-out and an opportunity to mentally recharge in a green oasis. The energy and the technology are green, so we wanted the architecture, the materials and the concept to reflect that. So, we designed a charging station in sustainable materials placed in a clean, calm setting with trees and plantings that offer people a dose of mindfulness on the highway.” The firm’s design of the ultra-fast EV charging station won the infrastructure award of the 2018 Danish Building Awards and is being implemented across Scandinavia with support from EU Commission projects Connecting Europe Facility and High Speed Electric Mobility Across Europe. + COBE Images via COBE and Rasmus Hjortshøj – COAST

More: 
Beautiful, solar-powered EV charging stations promise to charge a vehicle in 15 minutes

A gorgeous events center in Pennsylvania is built almost entirely out of eco-friendly timber

June 6, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on A gorgeous events center in Pennsylvania is built almost entirely out of eco-friendly timber

Residents of Nappanee, Indiana now have a beautiful timber events center to enjoy thanks to the Pennsylvania-based builders at Mid-Atlantic Timberframes . The Sammlung Platz (The Gathering Place in German) is a massive, multi-use center that is made out of natural timbers that give the space a unique structural strength as well as an exceptionally warm atmosphere. The Mid-Atlantic Timberframes company has established itself as a leader in the design of timber structures. Working directly with clients, the company crafts homes and commercial buildings using timber frames to create naturally strong structures that eliminate the need for load-bearing walls. Related: Green-roofed timber dwelling in Austria is built with recycled materials The Sammlung Platz is a pegged mortise and tenon-style timber construction that pays homage to traditional barns. Designed to accommodate up to 1,000 people, the two-level, 26,000-square-foot open floor plan can be used for any number of community or private events . From the sophisticated cabin-like exterior, guests enter the interior space through large wooden and glass doors. Inside, the spacious community center is clad in beautiful timber walls that cover the ground and upper levels, giving the space a warm, cozy atmosphere. To open up the space further, a vaulted ceiling with exposed beams hovers over the room. Using timber in the construction also allowed the building to be more eco-friendly. According to Mid-Atlantic Timberframes, the company’s timbers come from sustainably managed forests, and their suppliers plant as many as 10 times the number of trees they cut down. Building with timber also means significantly less carbon emissions are released during construction, as opposed to steel and concrete. Additionally, there is minimal waste, because the timber logs are used in their entirety, rather than using numerous specialty-cut lumber panels. + Mid-Atlantic Timberframes Images via Mid-Atlantic Timberframes

More: 
A gorgeous events center in Pennsylvania is built almost entirely out of eco-friendly timber

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1280 access attempts in the last 7 days.