Earthship pioneer Michael Reynolds is building the first sustainable school in Argentina

January 31, 2018 by  
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Architect Michael Reynolds is known for his sustainable “ Earthship ” buildings – and how he’s taking his radical work one step further by instilling the principles of green architecture in the next generation. Reynolds’ latest project is an ultra-green public elementary school made out of repurposed materials. The building is set in a remote Buenos Aires town, where Reynolds will teach students from around the world the basics of self-sustaining architecture. Working in collaboration with Una Escuela Sustentable – whose objective is to build a sustainable public school in every Latin American country – Reynolds will construct a sustainable elementary school in Mar Chiquita, a remote area outside of Buenos Aires. He will work with students from around the world to build the school, focusing on green design principles, construction methods, and philosophy. Related: Michael Reynolds Lands One of His Self-Sufficient Earthships at the End of the World Reynolds has worked with the program before, most notably in Jaureguiberry, Uruguay where he built an incredible school out of reclaimed materials with a team of students. Slated to begin construction in March 2018, the Mar Chiquita building will measure just under 3,000 square feet and it will be built in just seven weeks. The project will utilize Reynolds’ six core Earthship building principles – including recycled and repurposed materials, thermal/solar heating and cooling, water harvesting and contained sewage treatment. The school will also have an onsite food production area. You can help support the project by donating to the Mar Chiquita funding campaign on Indiegogo + Michael Reynolds Via Platforma Arquitectura Images via Una Escuela Sustentable

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Earthship pioneer Michael Reynolds is building the first sustainable school in Argentina

HASSELL and MVRDV tackle climate change in the Bay Area

January 31, 2018 by  
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A HASSELL -led design team that includes MVRDV has unveiled their preliminary proposed design strategy for tackling climate change in the San Francisco Bay Area as part of the yearlong Resilient by Design research challenge. The design team collected research by collaborating with local residents, design firms, experts, and public officials. Their findings identify existing areas of weakness in South San Francisco and potential design solutions for San Mateo County; the team will further develop the proposed strategy that will be presented in May. Modeled after the successful Rebuild by Design challenge, Resilient by Design asked designers around the world to develop community-based solutions that would protect the San Francisco Bay Area from sea level rise , severe storms, flooding, and earthquakes. Ten winning design teams were selected to embark on the yearlong research and design challenge, among them the HASSELL-led team that includes MVRDV, Deltares, Goudappel, Lotus Water, Civic Edge, Idyllist, Hatch, and Page & Turnbull. “ Climate change is real, by the end of the century there will be a sea level rise of 2 meters. Bay Area communities respond to this challenge in a multi-disciplinary approach to upgrade their general resilience,” said Nathalie de Vries, MVRDV co-founder. “We developed a flexible toolbox for San Mateo which helps the local community by revitalising public spaces that collect and connect people and water.” Related: Resilient infrastructure proposal aims to protect San Francisco Bay from rising sea levels Their recently released renderings and diagrams offer proposals for reconnecting San Francisco communities to the waterfront and for protecting the land from climate challenges. The team drew on historic precedent, such as responses to the devastating 1906 San Francisco earthquake, and observations of the recent Northern California wildfires. “The team now has the opportunity to apply its ‘collect and connect’ toolkit to proposed sites in South San Francisco,” wrote the design team, referring to the way streets and creeks are rethought of as connectors from a water management standpoint, while adaptive open spaces serve as collectors for everyday gathering, big events, and disaster assembly. “At Colma Creek, HASSELL has imagined a new Shoreline Park. Meanwhile, Grand Avenue will become a vital community hub with a drop-in storefront people can visit during the design phase. The team’s design process will draw heavily on local voices and insights to ensure that design solutions – which will be presented in May – reflect the community’s needs. In addition to the drop-in centre, city residents will be able to access a digital platform to learn about adapting for resilience and get involved in decision making.” + HASSELL + MVRDV Images via MVRDV

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HASSELL and MVRDV tackle climate change in the Bay Area

LEED Platinum housing development helps fight gentrification in Philadelphia

March 22, 2017 by  
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Can architects design attractive homes for developing areas that won’t feed into gentrification ? That’s what Interface Studio Architects (ISA) set off to achieve with Folsom Powerhouse, a LEED Platinum -certified development in Philadelphia. Located in the city’s rapidly developing Francisville neighborhood, the Powerhouse scheme combines environmentally friendly features with community-minded design that encourages diversity, density, and social spaces. Made up of 31 units, Folsom Powerhouse provides single-family town homes , duplexes, and two small apartment buildings at a range of prices. Although all the living options are modern in construction, Folsom Powerhouse took inspiration from an old community feature—the stoop. To create attractive street-level social spaces, ISA created “super stoops,” a sequence of entry platforms in front of the homes large enough for impromptu gatherings with steps that double as seating. Artist Jenny Sabin was commissioned to create beautiful fabricated metal handrail panels to make the stoops even more attractive. Related: Energy-positive townhouses power Boston’s grid with renewable energy The Folsom Powerhouse’s facades are made up of a patchwork of corrugated metal, timber cladding, and energy-efficient windows. Green roofs that top the buildings manage stormwater, as do the rain gardens on the street level. The corner buildings are topped with solar panels that generate electricity for the development. + Interface Studio Architects Via ArchDaily Images by Sam Oberter

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LEED Platinum housing development helps fight gentrification in Philadelphia

The self-contained mobile prefab Coodo lets you live almost anywhere in the world

February 15, 2017 by  
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What if you could make your home anywhere in the world without sacrificing creature comforts? Meet Coodo , an eco-friendly mobile home that promises just that with its flexible and modern modular design. Created in Germany, Coodo can pop up almost anywhere in the world – from urban rooftops to remote beaches – and it can be easily relocated to give you the freedom to travel with the comforts of home. Designed by LTG Lofts to go GmbH and Co. KG, Coodo is a mobile prefabricated house that can be quickly and easily installed with minimal impact on the building site and environment. The company offers a variety of Coodo models ranging in sizes from 36 to 96 square meters and usage type, such as the saunacoodo and watercoodo, which functions as a houseboat . Depending on the model selected, loading and unloading can take anywhere from a few minutes to a couple of hours. The Coodo is transported by flat bed truck and craned into place. All models boast a minimal and modern design that can be customized to the owner’s needs. In addition to the desire to provide freedom of travel to the homeowner, the company is also committed to minimizing the mobile home’s environmental impact. According to their website, all units consist of “low-pollutant, ecologically compatible, and mostly natural materials.” All condo houses are designed with passive house principles for energy efficiency and the company is currently developing off-grid units. Triple-glazed full-height windows and high-tech insulation wrap the rounded steel-framed modules and overlook an outdoor shaded deck built from recycled planking. A built-in micro-filtered ventilation and air moisture system ensures clean and dust-free indoor air. Almost all electrical devices will be connected to a wireless smart system so that they can be controlled remotely via smartphone. Related: Solar-powered Ecocapsule lets you live off-the-grid anywhere in the world “We want to lead by example by having a great impact on society and proving that high ecological and sustainable standards do not stand in opposition to equally high standards for design and comfort, but can work in harmony through innovation“, said Mark Dare Schmiedel, CEO of LTG. Prices are not listed on the website and are dependent on module type and interior options, which can be delivered as a shell, with basic interior, or fully equipped. + Coodo

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The self-contained mobile prefab Coodo lets you live almost anywhere in the world

Prefabricated green residential building is slated for Berlin’s new ‘live-work city’

September 23, 2016 by  
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On a site in Berlin currently home to old, ugly oilfield tanks, a revitalized district called WerkBundStadt is in the works. ingenhoven architects , along with 32 other firms, are designing residential and mixed-use buildings to transform the stagnant space into one of life and activity. igenhoven’s design reinterprets the brickwork commonly seen in older city areas by adding copious amounts of plants throughout the building’s facade. WerkBundStadt will include 1,100 units, including 330 rent controlled units. Each of the 33 architectural firms involved will design one project for the new district, which ingenhoven architects describes as a ” dense, socially and functionally mixed live-work city .” ingenhoven architects’ building includes residential units ranging in size “from apartments to maisonette.” Their building will include some of the subsidized housing units. Related: India’s Magic Breeze villa will be a giant park in the sky Central to the design of the building ingenhoven architects will contribute is the concept of sustainability . The facade of the building includes terraces and balconies bursting with plant life between brickwork to create “protected outdoor areas” that create a “dialogue between residential and urban space.” The facade design also allows for energy efficiency . Facing the south, the building is staggered so more terraces can be incorporated into the design. “Recyclable, prefabricated modular construction” will grant flexibility to the sustainable building. ingenhoven architects envisions that building in this way will allow for “functional and technical changes of uses throughout the life cycle of the building.” Part of their vision is that the designs for the green building will demonstrate a new way of building housing developments that is economically and environmentally responsible. igenhoven architects’ design will be presented this weekend as part of the German Werkbund Day as Werkbund Berlin , the organization behind WerkBundStadt, announces the plans for the new district. + ingenhoven architects + WerkBundStadt + Berlin Werkbund Images via ingenhoven architects/Illustration: Alexander Schmitz, Dusseldorf and WerkBundStadt Berlin

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Prefabricated green residential building is slated for Berlin’s new ‘live-work city’

Sustainable high-rise keeps cool in sultry Singapore with passive design and green roofs

May 26, 2016 by  
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The tropical climate and dense urban area of Singapore demands housing that accommodates both factors. Each phase of this project’s planning takes into consideration the need for low-environmental impact cooling needs, down to which direction the buildings face. The Terraces feature apartments facing the distinct bisecting waterway and adorned with rippling Juliet balconies, which mimic casual waves on the buildings’ facades. Related: Sweden’s first round Passive House boasts an innovative solar-powered balcony Cross-ventilation was prioritized all throughout the design, creating a passive climate-controlled environment. Continuous, open corridors allow air to cool the tropical location and provide plenty of natural sunlight for residents. The project also features both solar panels and green roofs as the cherries on top of the sustainable gem. As the architects say, this project “is a genuine precursor to the zero-energy mass housing that will be essential for the continued growth of Asia’s cities.” +group8asia Via ArchDaily Images via Patrick Bingham-Hall

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Sustainable high-rise keeps cool in sultry Singapore with passive design and green roofs

100% solar-powered super villa makes Arab housing sustainable again

February 29, 2016 by  
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Flexible CASA Housing Solution Fills Up Wasted Space in Mexico City

July 8, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Flexible CASA Housing Solution Fills Up Wasted Space in Mexico City Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: adaptable architecture , affordable housing , flexible housing , mexico architecture , mexico housing , Solar Decathlon , Solar Decathlon Europe 2014 , solar design , student design competition , sustainable housing , Team Mexico Solar Decathlon

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Flexible CASA Housing Solution Fills Up Wasted Space in Mexico City

Markus Jeschaunig’s Arc de Triomphe Highlights Consumer Waste with Two Tons of Stale Bread

July 8, 2014 by  
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Did you know that 70,000 tons of edible bread goes to waste every year in Austria? According to designer and sustainability advocate Markus Jeschaunig , the amount of food that Europeans waste every year would be more than enough to feed the world’s hungry. To bring awareness to the wastefulness in current consumer behavior, Jeschaunig recreated a model of the Arc de Triomphe from two tons of stale waste bread. Designed for Austria’s 2012 Lendwirbel Festival in Graz, the metal and wood arc highlights how society has prioritized capitalism and affluence at the expense of the environment and the hungry. At the close of the festival, the old bread was transported to a biogas plant and transformed into electricity. + Markus Jeschaunig The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: arc de triumph , arc de triumph bread , Austria , biogas plant , consumer waste , consumerist society , food waste , global hunger , graz , lendwirbel festival , Markus Jeschaunig , reader submitted content , stale bread , waste bread , wasteful consumerism , wastefulness

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Markus Jeschaunig’s Arc de Triomphe Highlights Consumer Waste with Two Tons of Stale Bread

Simbcity Zero-Energy Additions Revive Decaying Housing Estates in Spain

July 8, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Simbcity Zero-Energy Additions Revive Decaying Housing Estates in Spain Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: apartment blocks , apartments , High Rise Living , housing estate , Plateau Team , retrofit , Solar Decathlon Europe 2014 , Solar Power , Spain , Universidad de Alcalá de Henares , Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha , Urban Redevelopment , urban regeneration , wooden structures , Zero Energy Housing

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Simbcity Zero-Energy Additions Revive Decaying Housing Estates in Spain

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