Brilliant Tesla solar cell roof rotates to naturally cool proposed desert home in Iran

August 10, 2017 by  
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Tesla appears to be taking aim at revolutionizing homeownership and architects are taking note. Hot on the heels of Tesla’s eagerly awaited solar roof, Tehran-based BMDesign Studios created Alavi House, a home in Isfahan, Iran that’s to be finished with Tesla’s new and seemingly invisible solar cells. Optimized for solar, the Alavi House will produce more energy than it needs and feature a smart and operable double-skin to promote natural heating and cooling of the home. Named after its clients, the 550-square-meter Alavi House is proposed for a site at the foothills of the Zagros Mountain range at the edge of a desert . Due to the arid climate, the architects used the prevailing winds from the south and southwest to inform the roof’s sloped shape and direction. “With a roof tilted toward East, we can create effective zones of negative pressure at the climax of the roof helping to ventilate the building naturally through most of the year,” wrote the architects. “Controllable vents, at the climax of the roof have a sucking effect, together with the large openings to the south of the building. Air filters by flowing through a broken line of evergreen trees (Cedrus deodara) and over a pool in the outdoors and then by passing over an indoor garden of Snake Plants (Sansevieria trifasciata) which is known to be a great air purifier (NASA Clean Air Study) and over a pond.” Related: Tesla’s new Solar Roof is actually cheaper than a normal roof The home is finished in concrete save for the double skin on the sloped roof that would be clad in the nearly imperceptible Tesla solar cells installed 30 centimeters above the roof. The operable double skin roof can rotate open to allow the sun to heat the concrete roof and warm the interior. Alternatively on colder days, the roof rotates close to provide shade from the sun, while simultaneously optimizing conditions for generating solar energy. The 194-square-meter solar roof would feature 104 solar modules capable of meeting a minimum of 29,000 kWh a year, far exceeding the average electricity consumption of an Iranian household. Insulated glazing wraps the building on the south side to let in natural light and frame views of the cherry orchard and mountains. Communal areas are placed on the ground floor and include a tv room, kitchen, dining room, and bathroom that are connected to an indoor landscaped area and pool next to the outdoor pool. The upper level contains two master bedrooms and library. + BMDesign Studios Via highsnobiety Images via BMDesign Studios

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Brilliant Tesla solar cell roof rotates to naturally cool proposed desert home in Iran

How one family thrives in the Arctic with a cob house inside a solar geodesic dome

December 31, 2016 by  
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Life inside the Arctic Circle is by no means easy, unless you’re a Hjertefølger. We first heard about Benjamin and Ingrid Hjertefølger four years ago when they began building Nature House , a three-story cob house wrapped in a solar geodesic dome . Located on the island of Sandhornøya in northern Norway , the ultra-green home was designed to enable the family of six to eek out a sustainable existence despite challenging climatic conditions – they even grow most of their own food. Inhabitat recently caught up with the Hjertefølgers, who have now lived in their home for three years, to learn about their challenges and victories. The Hjertefølgers, which translates to Heartfollowers, live in Nature House with their four children – they’ve added one to their number since Inhabitat last wrote about them . After constructing their cob home topped with one of Solardome’s single-glazed geodesic domes with the help of friends and neighbors, the family moved in on December 8, 2013. Related: Gorgeous Solar Geodesic Dome Crowns Cob House in the Arctic Circle “The house works as we intended and planned. We love the house; it has a soul of its own and it feels very personal. What surprises us is the fact that we built ourselves anew as we built the house,” Ingrid Hjertefølger told Inhabitat. “The process changed us, shaped us.” The family had to design their home with extreme temperatures and wind in mind. It’s impossible to grow food in the dome in winter – Hjertefølger said there are three months without sun at Nature House – but the design does enable the family to grow food five months longer than they could outside. They grow apples, cherries, plums, apricots, kiwis, grapes, cucumbers, tomatoes, herbs, squash, and melons. Growing their own food is just the beginning of sustainable living at Nature House. Hjertefølger said all of their grey and black water is reused for fertilizing and watering the plants they grow. The family composts food scraps. They make sure to use clean, biodegradable household products, as elements in those products could end up in the food they eat. The home will have a long lifespan too – Hjertefølger said cob “lasts forever if you keep it dry,” and as their dwelling is always covered with the glass dome, it hasn’t been worn down by weather. She also said there’s no need to paint or even maintain the cob structure’s walls. Improvements could be made to the house, but for the most part the family seems incredibly satisfied with the design. “If we were to build a new Nature House, the ideal thing would be double glass on the green house so that we could have a tropical garden and no dripping in the winter,” said Hjertefølger. “But that is a bit unrealistic because it is very expensive with all that glass.” She also said they’d like to make a few changes to how the plant beds are set up “to get more usable space and better placement for different plants.” Overall, though, the family says they thrive inside Nature House. “The feeling we get as we walk into this house is something different from walking in to any other house,” Hjertefølger told Inhabitat. “The atmosphere is unique. The house has a calmness; I can almost hear the stillness. It is hard to explain. But it would have been impossible getting this feeling from a house someone else has planned and built for us, or a house with corners and straight lines.” + Nature House Images courtesy of Ingrid Hjertefølger

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How one family thrives in the Arctic with a cob house inside a solar geodesic dome

Tatiana Bilbao’s $8,000 house could help solve Mexico’s social housing shortage

November 9, 2015 by  
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Pumpkin Ridge Passive House consumes 90% less heating energy than a conventional house

August 20, 2015 by  
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Solar-powered House Lindau blends in with its lakeside surroundings in Germany

April 1, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of Solar-powered House Lindau blends in with its lakeside surroundings in Germany Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: eco design , eco home , germany , green architecture , Green Building , green design , green home , house lindau , km architektur , k_m architektur , lake constance , lindau , Solar Power , solar powered home , Sustainable Building , sustainable design , sustainable home

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Solar-powered House Lindau blends in with its lakeside surroundings in Germany

Passive House Che in Romania has a super fun indoor net canopy

December 26, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Passive House Che in Romania has a super fun indoor net canopy Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , eco design , eco home , eco house , green architecture , Green Building , green design , green home , green roof , indoor play area , net canopy , net lounge , passive house , passive house che , passivhaus , romania , sustainable design , sustainable home , tecto architects , tecto architectura , tecto arhitectura

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Passive House Che in Romania has a super fun indoor net canopy

INFOGRAPHIC: Meet the Ultra-Efficient Homes of the Future

November 18, 2014 by  
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Resources are dwindling, prices are rising, and energy efficiency has never been more important. Commercial buildings have long been designed with conservation in mind: Taiwan’s national stadium is covered almost entirely with solar panels , and the CaixaForum Museum in Madrid boasts a living wall of 15,000 plants. However, with the world’s population predicted to exceed 8 billion by 2050, architects are turning their green design skills to residential homes. Potential structures range from ancient mudbrick domes, to space-age Earthships . Some designs are more viable than others, but the Big Deal team have identified five of the most promising candidates. For a glimpse of the future, check out their infographic below. Read the rest of INFOGRAPHIC: Meet the Ultra-Efficient Homes of the Future Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , Big Deal , building materials , earth-sheltered home , earthship , Energy Savings , green alternative building materials , green building materials , green flooring , green home , green insulation , green structural components , infographic , passive solar , reader submitted content , Straw Bale , Superadobe , sustainable home , This is the Big Deal

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Atelier Data Transforms an Old Horse Stable into a Simple but Stunning Home in Portugal

October 31, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Atelier Data Transforms an Old Horse Stable into a Simple but Stunning Home in Portugal Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , adaptive reuse , Alcácer do Sal , Alentejo , Atelier Data , barn rehabilitation , barn renovation , eco home , eco house , farm rehabilitation , green architecture , Green Building , green design , green home , green renovation , horse stable , mews , mews housing , portugal , stable renovation , Sustainable Building , sustainable design , sustainable home

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Atelier Data Transforms an Old Horse Stable into a Simple but Stunning Home in Portugal

Salt Destroys Manhattan-Sized Croplands Every Week, UN Study Shows

October 31, 2014 by  
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A new UN paper  reveals that excess salt in the soil has destroyed 20 percent of all irrigated land worldwide — an area equal to the size of France. Every day for more than 20 years, an average of 2,000 hectares of irrigated cropland in arid and semi-arid areas across 75 countries have been degraded by salt. With the world population expected to hit nine to 10 billion people by 2050, obviously we can’t afford to be losing productive, arable land. Thankfully, the report also makes a number of recommendations for swift action to reverse the trend before it becomes too expensive to do so. Read the rest of Salt Destroys Manhattan-Sized Croplands Every Week, UN Study Shows Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: agriculture , economic impact of salinity , farm land , farming , global development , irrigation , loss of farm land to salt , report , salinity , salt , study , United Nations , United Nations University , water issues

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Salt Destroys Manhattan-Sized Croplands Every Week, UN Study Shows

The Luxembourg House is Richard Meier & Partners’ Most Sustainable Residence Yet

September 22, 2014 by  
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