1-acre permaculture farm in Australia feeds 50 families

September 4, 2017 by  
Filed under Green, Recycle

Comments Off on 1-acre permaculture farm in Australia feeds 50 families

This family in Australia completely shifted the way they source their food – with remarkable success. When wife Nici suffered an illness, the Coopers decided to start growing their own produce at home in Newcastle, and now their one-acre Limestone Permaculture Farm supplies dozens of families with fresh food . They also offer permaculture education and internships, sharing what they’ve learned with the greater community . The Coopers have been farming at Limestone Permaculture Farm for close to a decade. They grow organic produce , and raise sheep, goats, and chickens. They also keep bees and build with recycled materials , and The farm is powered by energy from wood, water, and the sun – pretty much every greenie’s dream come true. TreeHugger said co-owner Brett suggested they can feed 50 families from the one-acre farm . Related: Man leaves rat race to grow dream permaculture farm – and it’s flourishing after 3 years Swales, a chicken tractor, and self-seeding edible ground cover are among the permaculture techniques the Coopers employ at Limestone Permaculture Farm. Brett discovered permaculture over a decade ago. He told the Newcastle Herald , “I was a builder and had done architectural drafting. When I found permaculture, it was less about one form and more about following nature’s design . It blew my mind.” The Coopers offer farm tours, workshops, internships, and a permaculture design certificate at their New South Wales farm. They still have jobs and only work the farm part-time, but are hoping to transition to permaculture farming full-time. “We feel there has been an awakening across our beautiful country, self-reliance is on the rise again; urban and rural homesteading has people taking their food and energy supply back into their own hands,” the Coopers say on their website. “With each passing day we are transitioning to a more wholesome life, creating a more fulfilling and positive future, not just for ourselves but also for our family, friends, and community.” + Limestone Permaculture Farm Via Happen Films and TreeHugger Images via Limestone Permaculture Farm Facebook

View original here: 
1-acre permaculture farm in Australia feeds 50 families

Shanghai is planning a massive 100-hectare vertical farm to feed 24 million people

April 12, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Shanghai is planning a massive 100-hectare vertical farm to feed 24 million people

International architecture firm Sasaki just unveiled plans for a spectacular 100-hectare urban farm set amidst the soaring skyscapers of Shanghai. The project is a mega farming laboratory that will meet the food needs of almost 24 million people while serving as a center for innovation, interaction, and education within the world of urban agriculture. The Sunqiao Urban Agricultural District is composed of vertical farms that fit in nicely between the city’s many towers, adding a welcomed green counterpart to the shiny metal and glass cityscape. In a city like Shanghai, where real estate prices make vertical building more affordable, the urban farm layout counts on a number of separate buildings that will have various growing platforms such as algae farms , floating greenhouses, vertical walls and even seed libraries. The project incorporates several different farming methods including hydroponic and aquaponic systems. Related:Sasaki Architecture convert a former disco club into an office space with floating walls The masterplan was designed to provide large-scale food production as well as education. Sunqiao will focus on sustainable agriculture as a key component for urban growth. “This approach actively supports a more sustainable food network while increasing the quality of life in the city through a community program of restaurants, markets, a culinary academy, and pick-your-own experience” explained Sasaki. “As cities continue to expand, we must continue to challenge the dichotomy between what is urban and what is rural. Sunqiao seeks to prove that you can have your kale and eat it too.” Visitors to the complex will be able to tour the interactive greenhouses, a science museum, and aquaponics systems, all of which are geared to showcase the various technologies which can help keep a large urban population healthy. Additionally, there will be family-friendly events and workshops to educate children about various agricultural techniques . + Sasaki Via Archdaily

Here is the original: 
Shanghai is planning a massive 100-hectare vertical farm to feed 24 million people

Sun Commune pavilion teaches urban kids about sustainable farming in China

April 4, 2017 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Sun Commune pavilion teaches urban kids about sustainable farming in China

For a country like China , where one-fifth of the farmland is contaminated, raising awareness about sustainable farming is more important than ever. That’s why design studio Superimpose teamed up with the local farming community in rural Hangzhou’s Tai Yang Valley to build an educational pavilion about organic food production. Created for the local initiative Sun Commune, the ring-shaped MICR-O pavilion serves as an educational platform to teach children from Hangzhou and Shanghai about nature and sustainable practices. Elevated on stilts and located between rice fields and bamboo forests, the MICR-O pavilion was built with a repetitive structural A-frame made of locally reclaimed pine. The low-cost yet elegant pavilion sits lightly on the land and is wrapped in white canvas, giving it a modern and simple appearance. The circular structure wraps around an open-air deck, accessible via three access points and used for group activities and events. Related: Smog-filled Beijing is building a ‘green necklace’ around the city to curb pollution Throughout the year, children from Hangzhou and Shanghai are invited to camp at MICR-O and learn about sustainable farming. Camp attendees can sleep overnight at the pavilion on mats laid overtop the pine floor. The architects write: “The structural A frame, a ninety-degree angled triangle, gives the design an externally pure shape, while internally the patio opens towards the sky and surroundings.” + Superimpose Via ArchDaily Images by Marc Goodwin

Read the original post:
Sun Commune pavilion teaches urban kids about sustainable farming in China

10 landscape design projects that turned neglected spaces into incredible parks

January 16, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on 10 landscape design projects that turned neglected spaces into incredible parks

Landscape architects frequently work to transform areas that contain industrial and toxic waste, infrastructure no longer in use, or land affected by war , natural disaster or disuse. These neglected places, while often having a negative impact on the environment and surrounding community, are simultaneously part of our cultural heritage. To highlight the significance of these spaces, and the potential that they hold to become something more than a blight, we’ve gathered up a series of projects that illuminate how designers use unlikely opportunities to transform landscapes into spectacular spaces—all while preserving their historic and cultural meaning. These 10 case studies showcase the creative approaches global city governments, preservationists, developers and the design community have taken to transform marginalized places into healthy and meaningful environments for everyone to enjoy.

View original here: 
10 landscape design projects that turned neglected spaces into incredible parks

This massive farm grows 15% of Australia’s tomatoes without soil, fresh water or fossil fuels

October 24, 2016 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on This massive farm grows 15% of Australia’s tomatoes without soil, fresh water or fossil fuels

Did you know there is a way to grow tons of fresh fruits and vegetables with saltwater and solar energy ? The good people at SunDrop Farms are doing just that with their Australian operation, where they grow 15 percent of the nation’s tomatoes. Seawater is piped in from a nearby gulf, desalinated using the reflected heat of the sun , and sprinkled on hydroponically grown produce in a revolutionary, renewable cycle of production. SunDrop Farms’ operation is fossil fuel -free, freshwater-free, and soil-free, eliminating the need for some of the most financially and environmentally costly elements in the agriculture business. The company told Aljazeera their sustainable method of growing produce slashes “26,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide ” and 180 Olympic-sized swimming pools of fresh water each year, which is just what a rapidly growing population needs to offset human demand on Mother Earth. Related: Solar-powered Ring Garden marries desalination and agriculture for drought-stricken California A field of mirrors surround a massive solar tower, which reflect the sun onto this central point. The tower heats up to provide a steady temperature for the greenhouses and to desalinate one million liters of seawater per day. The tomatoes on their Australian farm are grown hydroponically in coconut coir and 15,000 tonnes are sold exclusively to the local Coles grocery chain every year. SunDrop Farms has locations in Australia, the UK, and the US and hopes to expand “cutting-edge, sustainable technology” to other locales in the near future. +SunDrop Farms Via Aljazeera Images via SunDrop Farms

Read the original here: 
This massive farm grows 15% of Australia’s tomatoes without soil, fresh water or fossil fuels

IKEA’s Space10 is creating on-site aquaponic farms for restaurant supply

June 9, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on IKEA’s Space10 is creating on-site aquaponic farms for restaurant supply

Using LED lights from the IKEA RYDDA/VÄXER hydroponic garden , which will be available in the US next year, along with some good old classic shelves and plastic bins, Space10 has created a farm in a tiny basement room of their studio in Copenhagen. Over 80 percent of the supplies to create the farm came straight from IKEA, hacked to suit the purpose, of course. The entire project shows how technology and nature can combine to create a sustainable future – from the sounds of birds chirping, which came from a nearby iPad (plants are reported to grow better when they are surrounded by the sounds of their natural habitat), to the green sprouts peeking out of their earthy substrate. Related: IKEA reaches for net positive energy status in the next four years Space10 looked at the question of how we can make a positive impact on the planet from a different perspective. They toyed around with the idea of creating a shower alarm that lets you know when a person has used too much water until they realized not only is the shower one of the last places we can escape technology, you’d have to skip showers for months to equal the water used in one hamburger. So they shifted gears and started asking how they could make a burger water-friendly. The solution? Bugs. Combined with on-site grown herbs and lettuces, the combination turns a classic unsustainable American meal into one with very little impact on the planet. For lunch, Space10 served Inhabitat a meal that showed how food could be supplied right on site and have little impact on the environment. We were each given a miniature garden that we harvested and placed on top of our bugburger, made from mealworm, beetroot and gluten, which was shockingly tasty thanks to chef Simon Perez . Along with a side of surprise fries (also containing insects), the meal showed how beautiful, delicious and sustainable the future of food can be. Space10 hopes to illustrate how food supplies can be pushed into the future, and our host Carla  likened the situation to the human body: when we get sick, we eat healthier, take better care of ourselves, exercise and do our best to feel better. Right now, the planet is sick, and we need to help care for it in order to heal it. A sustainable food supply is key, and it can start right at home – or in this case – right in the restaurant. Space10 is going to test the aquaponics concept in the IKEA restaurant in Malmö, Sweden. No word on whether the bugburger will be hitting your lunch plate any time soon. Photos by Kristine Lofgren for Inhabitat

Read the original post:
IKEA’s Space10 is creating on-site aquaponic farms for restaurant supply

Ohio’s 100-Acre Classroom teaches farming skills to middle-school students

April 10, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Ohio’s 100-Acre Classroom teaches farming skills to middle-school students

Click here to view the embedded video. Imagine a school environment in which subjects like chemistry, biology, math, and home ec are learned outside in the fresh air. Sound too good to be true? Well, the Hershey Montessori Farm School  in Geauga County offers exactly that. Every day, 50 middle school students , some of whom come from as far as Australia for this type of education, attend school on this farm , which consists of close to 100 acres of wooded land. There, the students work with both their hands and their heads, learning where their food comes from and how to cultivate it from seed to harvest. They grow vegetables such as tomatoes, beans, leeks, broccoli, and a variety of greens , and also learn how to tend chickens, goats, horses, and other animals. Students also take turns doing chores and preparing meals. Rather than relegating young people to a scant few classrooms, the entire farm is a learning environment where they can get hands-on experience and exercise. + Hershey Montessori Farm School The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 100-acre farm school , agriculture , farm education , farm school , farming , food farm , food security , hands-on education , Hershey Montessori Farm School , Montessori , Montessori farm school , Montessori School , Ohio farm school , organic agriculture , organic farm , organic farming , sustainable farming

View original post here:
Ohio’s 100-Acre Classroom teaches farming skills to middle-school students

World’s largest indoor vertical farm will produce 2 million pounds of soil-free food in Newark

March 11, 2015 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on World’s largest indoor vertical farm will produce 2 million pounds of soil-free food in Newark

Read the rest of World’s largest indoor vertical farm will produce 2 million pounds of soil-free food in Newark Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: AeroFarms , aeroponics , converted steel factory , indoor vertical farm , LEDs , micro fleece cloth , new jersey , newark , RBH Group , sustainable farming , urban farm , Urban Farming , vertical farm , world’s largest indoor vertical farm , zero pesticides

Read the original: 
World’s largest indoor vertical farm will produce 2 million pounds of soil-free food in Newark

Loguer Unveils Corn-Inspired Mexican Pavilion Design for the 2015 Milan Expo

September 8, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Loguer Unveils Corn-Inspired Mexican Pavilion Design for the 2015 Milan Expo

Architecture firm Loguer Design recently unveiled designs for the Mexican pavilion that will be constructed at the upcoming 2015 Milan World Expo . Winner of a national competition, the pavilion design mimics the shape of overlapping dried corn husks, paying homage to one of the most important food staples in Mexico as well as the 2015 Expo’s theme “Feeding the Planet, Energy for Life.” Read the rest of Loguer Unveils Corn-Inspired Mexican Pavilion Design for the 2015 Milan Expo Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: 2015 Milan Expo , 2015 world expo , chinampas , corn husks , corn-inspired architecture , Loguer Design , mexican pavilion , mexico pavilion 2015 , pavilion , sustainable farming

View post:
Loguer Unveils Corn-Inspired Mexican Pavilion Design for the 2015 Milan Expo

Learn How to Sustainably Farm Crops at the Perennial Agriculture Immersion Class in Asheville, NC

July 28, 2014 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on Learn How to Sustainably Farm Crops at the Perennial Agriculture Immersion Class in Asheville, NC

Want to learn about sustainable farming but don’t have the time to WWOOF ? Then you may be interested in the Perennial Agriculture Immersion class, a three-week course in August hosted by the Urban Farm School in Asheville, NC. The program includes hands-on workshops, classes, and field trips that will teach students how to sustainably farm crops, design permanent woodsheds, manage pests, and keep bees and chickens. The fee, which includes lodging and tuition for 18 days from August 10 through August 28, is $2,200. + Perennial Agriculture Immersion The article above was submitted to us by an Inhabitat reader. Want to see your story on Inhabitat ? Send us a tip by following this link . Remember to follow our instructions carefully to boost your chances of being chosen for publishing! Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: asheville , asheville urban farm school , bee keeping , perennial agriculture immersion class , reader submitted content , sustainable farming , Urban Farm School , Urban Farming , woodsheds , WWOOF

Read more here: 
Learn How to Sustainably Farm Crops at the Perennial Agriculture Immersion Class in Asheville, NC

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1092 access attempts in the last 7 days.