Adaptable House Accommodates Major Life Changes to Dramatically Reduce its Carbon Footprint

September 18, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of Adaptable House Accommodates Major Life Changes to Dramatically Reduce its Carbon Footprint Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “sustainable architecture” , adaptable house , carbon emissions , carbon footprint , Denmark , henning larsen architects , minicab houses , nybord

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Adaptable House Accommodates Major Life Changes to Dramatically Reduce its Carbon Footprint

Dark Towers to Beach Bunkers: Architecture of Hugon Kowalski

September 9, 2011 by  
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[ By Steph in Art & Design . ] Rising from natural surroundings, the towers of ‘Instant House’ are harsh and spare, a far cry from the often lush biologically-inspired visuals of eco-friendly architecture. Just from this one example, it’s clear that Hugon Kowalski of Polish firm H3AR Architecture and Design has a uniquely urban and utilitarian approach to sustainable structures that inevitably stands out from the crowd. Kowalski’s proposals, including the aforementioned Instant House , temporary residential units made of styrofoam concrete cylinders, stand like visions for a post-apocalyptic future. Although they are often described as bleak and reminiscent of the harsh clumsiness of now-abandoned Soviet structures, Kowalski’s projects are, above all, practical, meeting the challenges of the future head-on. Instant House is designed to be constructed quickly and easily; in 2014, Kowalski says, it will be possible to produce concrete from rice husks, reducing carbon dioxide emissions during the manufacturing process. Another project, House on the Beach , above, is inspired by the design of the four-legged concrete tetrapod, which is meant to prevent beach erosion – essentially giving beach houses a function. Rather than being little more than inevitable casualties during a tsunami or other disaster, they serve as the front line in a battle against the ravaging forces of nature, breaking up the waves. Kowalski imagines, for the stark deserts of Sudan, watertower skyscrapers that can access water in an existing underground lake beneath Darfur – the tenth largest in the world – and pump it to the surface. Inside these structures are not only the pumps but also a water treatment plant, a hospital, a school and a food storage center. Constructed using compressed dry clay bricks made on site from local materials, the towers would use some of the circulated water to heat or cool the buildings. Want More? Click for Great Related Content on WebEcoist: Airy Architecture: 13 Homes Open to Nature These 13 homes blur the boundaries between outdoors and in using large sliding panels, garage doors or perforated screens to open the home to the cooling breeze. Click Here to Read More »» Eco Expectations: 14 Green Buildings of Tomorrow What will the buildings and cities of the future look like? These futuristic designs all feature green walls or roofs to maximize their eco-friendliness factor. 2 Comments – Click Here to Read More »» Man-Made Jungle: Exotic Architecture for Rain Forests & More These 12 jungle dwellings – from tiny tree houses to entire communities – are uniquely suited for their harsh untamed environments. Click Here to Read More »» [ By Steph in Art & Design . ] [ WebEcoist | Archives | Galleries | Privacy | TOS ]

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Dark Towers to Beach Bunkers: Architecture of Hugon Kowalski

Spectacular Steel Reclamation Center Building Design

August 12, 2011 by  
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[ By Steph in Art & Design & Science & Research & Transit & Auto . ] Sleek and futuristic, this wing-like structure is a research and education facility for the promotion of steel recycling – perched right over a junkyard where this recycling is carried out. The American Institute of Steel Reclamation in Sun Valley, California takes a close look at one of the most sustainable industries in the United States. Designed by Jeffrey Dahl and Jan Lim, the building features three columns supporting an arc that give occupants, including the public, unobstructed views of the activity going on in the auto scrapyard below. Providing such education opportunities around what Dahl and Lim consider a fascinating topic could help spur public interest in recycling. Because the population of cars in the U.S. is expected to grow to 1 billion by the year 2050, a 40% increase over 2008, more and more cars will end up in these junkyards, ready to be turned into new steel. Dahl and Lim designed the institute to be elevated four times above the current car height to represent this anticipated growth. “The boomerang shape really highlights the machinery and technical beauty of a scrap yard, educating visiting in a first-person experience rather than pictures in a book or on a computer screen,” Dahl told EnviroMetal, a steel recycling blog. “There is always the library, the internet, or a local chapter of a steel organization, but just like the concept of my design, getting out and seeing steel in action first-hand is the best way… Today it may be a 10 year old car, but 1 week from now it can be the steel structure for a new school. This is a truly amazing process.” Want More? Click for Great Related Content on WebEcoist: Green Your Mind: South Korea’s Ecosystem Research Utopia South Korea’s planned Ecorium Project consists of huge greenhouses, beautiful nature preserves, and high-tech research and education facilities. 1 Comment – Click Here to Read More »» 12 Green Megastructures for an Eco-Fantastic Future? Futuristic or folly? Massive megastructures for healthy high-density housing that capture or desalinate water, produce renewable energy and create micro-climates! Click Here to Read More »» Backwards Vending: Machine Pays For Recyclables This vending machine is exactly the opposite of what you’d expect: instead of inserting money and getting a drink, you insert bottles and get points for prizes. 1 Comment – Click Here to Read More »» [ By Steph in Art & Design & Science & Research & Transit & Auto . ] [ WebEcoist | Archives | Galleries | Privacy | TOS ]

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Spectacular Steel Reclamation Center Building Design

Cob Creations: 18 Natural Homes, Pizza Ovens & More

August 1, 2011 by  
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[ By Steph in Art & Design & Home & Garden . ] Cob is a natural building material made using mud, straw and lime that has been in use for millennia. Fireproof, earthquake-resistant and very inexpensive to build with, cob can be used to make stunningly creative homes, sheds, benches and wood-fired bread ovens. These 18 examples of cob creations illustrate the material’s beauty and versatility. Three Cob Hobbit Houses (images via: simondale.net , yearofmud , cob cottage co ) For those familiar with cob construction, these three houses represent the most recognizable form achievable with the medium. Cob lends itself wonderfully to rounded structures like the Simondale ‘hobbit house’ (top two images), a green-roofed cob house at the Dancing Rabbit Eco Village (below left) and another at the Cob Cottage Company in Oregon. Stunning Cob Interior (images via: greenbuildingelements ) There’s no end to the customization that’s possible with cob. Because cob is so easy to work with, even beginners can create staircases, niches, built-in benches, bookcases and other cob features in home interiors. This home, built by Meka Bunch of Wolf Creek, Oregon, is an incredible example of just how creative cob builders can get. Cute Cob Cottage (image via: greenvillages.co ) Is this cob cottage adorable or what? Built in a somewhat more modern design, this home features a curving roof, a second-floor balcony and chains that act as gutters and are also an interesting design detail. Stone is visible along the foundation; this helps to protect the cob from water damage. Two Indoor Cob Fireplaces (images via: firespeaking.com , onelessbrickinthewall.com ) Niches, bookcases and stairways aren’t the only interior details that can be sculpted with cob. You can make your fireplace out of cob, two, as illustrated by these two examples. Cob Building at the Anam Cara Collective (image via: cultureartist.org ) This sustainable cob house at the Anam Cara Collective in Asheville, North Carolina features lots of windows, a large wooden deck and solar panels for power. Anam Cara holds regular cob building workshops that teach participants how to work with this natural, inexpensive building material. Adorable Cob Garden Shed (image via: cityfarmer.org ) Not ready to take the plunge with a cob house? You could give a shed a shot. This one, located in Vancouver, Cananda, has a green roof covered in local vegetation. Its exterior was plastered with clay. Traditional Cob Houses of England (images via: supermac1961 , buildsomethignbeautiful ) Cob homes are not a new concept; clay bricks have been used to create human dwellings for thousands of years. Cob in particular has been used to build houses in Great Britain at least since the 13th century. Many of those homes, with traditional thatched roofs, still stand today, and the style is experiencing a revival with companies like Build Something Beautiful using it for new construction. The Hand-Sculpted House (image via: tinyhouseblog ) This beautiful structure is home to Ianto Evans and Linda Smiley, authors of The Hand Sculpted House and co-owners of the Cob Cottage Company in Oregon. Though cob houses are often round, they can be built in any shape, with or without a wooden frame. Four Fun Sculptural Cob Ovens (images via: natural building , designbuildlive.org , ilovecob.com , dayonedesign ) A great way to practice with cob building is to construct a pizza oven. The book Build Your Own Earth Oven by Kiko Denzer explains how with step-by-step instructions, including recipes for wood-fired bread once your oven is done. These four ovens are great examples of cob ovens that double as outdoor sculptures. Two Combination Cob Oven/Benches (images via: mudsunfun.org , our ecovillage ) Cob ovens can also be combined with benches into one large structure. The benefit of creating a cob oven/bench combo is that in cold months, the oven will heat up the benches, making them a cozy place to enjoy the outdoors. Want More? Click for Great Related Content on WebEcoist: Eco Homes from the Earth: 7 Ways to DIY Build your own beautiful green home on the cheap with natural, eco-friendly materials like cob, rammed earth and straw bales. 1 Comment – Click Here to Read More »» Living Buildings: The World’s Most Sustainable Structures Could these buildings be the greenest in the world? A private home, a learning center & a center for sustainable living achieve Living Building Certification. 2 Comments – Click Here to Read More »» 30 Eco-Chic Houses Made of 10 Types of Recycled Materials These 30 homes were crafted from materials that most people consider junk: tires, pallets, old silos, broken boats, shipping containers – even tin cans. 1 Comment – Click Here to Read More »» [ By Steph in Art & Design & Home & Garden . ] [ WebEcoist | Archives | Galleries | Privacy | TOS ]

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Cob Creations: 18 Natural Homes, Pizza Ovens & More

Sliding Skin Adapts to Sunlight in Egypt’s SLIDES House

July 29, 2011 by  
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[ By Steph in Art & Design . ] There’s no shortage of sunlight in the wide open deserts of Egypt, and while that means lots of potential for solar energy, it also makes temperature regulation difficult. But new designs for sustainable architecture, like the SLIDES House , adapt and adjust in order to maximize solar power efficiency while keeping occupants cool. Representing American University in Cairo’s entry for the 2012 European Solar Decathlon, the SLIDES House combines elements of traditional Egyptian architecture with modern features. Designed in the shape of a matchbox, the house includes a double layered facade of interlocking perforated pieces mimicking the patterns seen in Arabic buildings. The building is made from a recycled material developed by the students, which is a fiber-reinforced polymer made of plastic bags and wood waste. The perforations control the amount of sunlight that enters the interior of the building, providing a cool, shaded haven from the heat without a need for air conditioning. Solar panels on the roof make use of all the sun while a grey water filter recycles water for irrigation and toilets. The coolest feature of the building (in more ways than one!) is hinted at in the name. The perforated panels can actually slide out to reveal an inner structure with glass walls. This allows occupants to open up the interior to the light in the winter months; the screen absorbs heat which is stored in thermal mass flooring. Want More? Click for Great Related Content on WebEcoist: From Ancient Air Conditioners to Contemporary Passive Homes The modern air conditioner is only about a century old. So what did people do to survive the summers before then? They used ingenious natural cooling methods. 3 Comments – Click Here to Read More »» Sun + Shade = Stunningly Stylish Public Solar Arrays These smart shades feature modular solar panels that let summer-loving adventurers enjoy the shade while reaping the benefits of the sun all at once. Click Here to Read More »» Let the Sun Shine: Solar Decathlon Europe 2010 Winners The Solar Decathlon highlights the best and most innovative in solar home design. These 5 entries were picked as the judges’ favorites in the 2010 competition. Click Here to Read More »» [ By Steph in Art & Design . ] [ WebEcoist | Archives | Galleries | Privacy | TOS ]

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Sliding Skin Adapts to Sunlight in Egypt’s SLIDES House

Rojkind Arquitectos’ Cineteca Nacional del Siglo XXI amalgamates trees into the layout

July 15, 2011 by  
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Ritu Mathur: Cineteca Nacional del Siglo XXI Cineteca Nacional del Siglo XXI by Rojkind Arquitectos in Mexico city Very soon visitors at ‘Cineteca Nacional del Siglo XXI’ will find the place in its new avatar. The theater is soon going to be renovated and upgraded for the better. Mexican architect Mcihael Rojkiend and his partner Gerardo Salinas have been awarded for the design of the building. The architecture firm will renovate the building and through some additions and deletions will make it an ideal place for people to hang out on holidays and weekends. The award to this architect firm has been given by none other than National Council for Culture and Arts at Mexico. The central Plaza will be a special attraction for the visitors as it will amalgamate trees into the layout to add a green touch to the plaza. Picture Gallery Cineteca Nacional del Siglo XXI Cineteca Nacional del Siglo XXI by Rojkind Arquitectos in Mexico city The purpose behind this huge exercise is to create better cinematic experiences for the tourists and localities. Besides, more features will be added to the place to make it more fun and interesting. For this the built area will increase after renovation by 9000 meter square. In this space other things will be added. A total of 7000 meters square will be opened for public access. Major changes in this project involve restructuring of the parking space. Presently the parking space is spread out on the ground level and hence occupies a lot of space. This parking space will be transformed into a six level parking space with advanced technology. The freed space will then be used for making an amphitheater, a central plaza and a public park. The renovated space will have four new screening rooms. This will add up to thousand extra seats from 2050 to 3050. Besides, the project will also increase the storing place for keeping archives. The central plaza will also include parks, cafes and a square for people to have common places for chilling out. Via: Designboom

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Rojkind Arquitectos’ Cineteca Nacional del Siglo XXI amalgamates trees into the layout

Stylish, but Sustainable? Synthetic Super-Sized Wood Trees

May 1, 2011 by  
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[ By Delana in Art & Design & Geography & Travel & News & Politics . ] An ambitious architectural project seven years in the making has finally opened in the heart of Seville, Spain

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Stylish, but Sustainable? Synthetic Super-Sized Wood Trees

Disaster-Proof Architecture: 13 Super-Strong Structures

April 22, 2011 by  
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[ By Steph in Art & Design . ] High-profile earthquakes, tsunamis, floods, hurricanes and other natural disasters have made it more clear than ever that in the face of climate change, stronger buildings able to withstand such events are not just advisable but necessary. These 13 designs range from fantastical concepts for entire floating cities to real homes that have already proven themselves disaster-proof, and from large-scale billion-dollar projects to low-cost housing solutions for the poor

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Disaster-Proof Architecture: 13 Super-Strong Structures

Man-Made Jungle: Exotic Architecture for Rain Forests & More

April 8, 2011 by  
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[ By Steph in Art & Design & Geography & Travel & Nature & Ecosystems . ] Beautiful and untamed, the jungle can be an inhospitable setting for human inhabitance when dwellings are not designed in harmony with the climate and landscape.

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Man-Made Jungle: Exotic Architecture for Rain Forests & More

Erasmus University’s student pavilion design features a roof with intelligent solar panels

January 6, 2011 by  
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Eco Factor: Sustainable student pavilion aims to remain energy neutral in its operation. Paul de Ruiter Architects have unveiled their designs for the Erasmus University’s student pavilion that aims to remain energy neutral in its operation.

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Erasmus University’s student pavilion design features a roof with intelligent solar panels

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