Restored Bristol Hotel celebrates Appalachia

July 1, 2019 by  
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The Bristol, a newly opened boutique hotel that straddles the Virginia/Tennessee line, is a restored 1925 architectural landmark. Opened last October, the boutique hotel embraces both the musical and industrial roots of Appalachia. Visitors come to Bristol to explore the town known as the “Birthplace of Country Music.” Design elements in the 65-room property include exposed brick walls, a former hand-crank elevator on display and entryways resembling Roman arches. Visitors can join local herbalists for wildcrafting classes, or take a banjo lesson. Lumac, the hotel bar, offers panoramic views of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Vivian’s Table, the hotel restaurant, features scratch-made regional cuisine made with local ingredients. Other historic/ sustainable elements include a lobby front desk made of recycled glass and a hanging glass sculpture composed of vintage soda bottles. Related: Meet Maya Ka’an: Mexico’s newest ecotourism destination The Bristol’s Discarded Denim program celebrates the town’s rich denim history. Guests can leave their unwanted denim at checkout and the hotel will donate it to the local Valley Institute Elementary School for its annual recycled textiles fashion show. Any excess denim will be sent to  Blue Jeans Go Green . The town takes pride in its denim company, L.C. King Denim Manufacturing, the oldest cut and sew factory in the U.S. In the early 1900s, Landon Clayton King was raising champion bird dogs at his home in the Appalachian Mountains. He needed tougher clothes to withstand the demands of farming and hunting, which inspired the denim line in the factory he opened in 1913. Today, his great-grandson Jack King runs the company, which has partnered with the Bristol Hotel to provide many of the design elements. Hotel restaurant, Vivian’s Table, uses L.C. King’s striped cloth on its chair seats. Hotel guests can even book behind the scenes factory tours to learn about denim manufacturing. The Bristol’s denim recycling program is part of a much bigger movement. Since real denim is made mostly from cotton, it can be broken down and recycled into something new. Blue Jeans Go Green collects denim to upcycle into insulation . If you want to recycle your denim without going all the way to Bristol, Blue Jeans Go Green’s website lists drop off sites and ways to host your own collection party. + Bristol Images via Bristol Hotel

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Restored Bristol Hotel celebrates Appalachia

Airplanes’ contrail clouds are more harmful than their carbon emissions

July 1, 2019 by  
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The streaky clouds behind airplanes are the center of a new study that looks at these clouds’ contribution to climate change . As airplanes reach higher altitudes they release not only exhaust but also water vapor that forms clouds known as contrails. While most contrails dissipate quickly, others remain for hours and warm the atmosphere. The German Aerospace Center used widely accepted climate models to predict how the impact of contrails will change over the next few decades. According to its models, the global warming effect of contrails alone could triple by 2050 . This rate of growth is higher than that of exhaust emissions, thanks to current and future innovations in fuel-efficient technology. In fact, the greenhouse gas effect of contrails is higher than the total impact of carbon emissions from airplane exhaust. Related: Time-saving supersonic airplanes could be a disaster for the environment The airline industry is expected to quadruple over the next few decades and newer planes tend to fly higher than their predecessors. This means that contrails are likely to remain in the atmosphere longer, especially over tropical areas, where the conditions extend the life of the clouds. Although low-hanging clouds tend to cool down the Earth’s temperatures, those higher up actually absorb thermal radiation emitted from the Earth and then warm the atmosphere. What start as thin, long clouds can spread across thousands of square miles in certain conditions. In relation to other emissions , the streaky clouds have a small and possibly insignificant contribution to climate change. “While the contrail forcing is certainly significant, it’s a relatively small contributor to overall warming,” an atmospheric scientist from Dartmouth College told Earther . However, because the climate crisis has reached the point of all-hands-on-deck, every identified source of emissions is a target for reduction via innovation and advanced technology . Via Earther Image via Pexels

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Airplanes’ contrail clouds are more harmful than their carbon emissions

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