Sustainability metrics should grow along with bond yields

December 14, 2017 by  
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Less than one-third of U.S. publicly traded companies are quantifying sustainability risks and opportunities in SEC filings, and that’s a problem.

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Sustainability metrics should grow along with bond yields

Thai Union hooks a new CSO; Ford Foundation invests in Mission

December 13, 2017 by  
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December’s career moves involve new leadership in seafood traceability, chemicals at Costco and sustainability in spirits.

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Thai Union hooks a new CSO; Ford Foundation invests in Mission

Why the Clean Power Plan is good for business

December 13, 2017 by  
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Apparel company VF Corporation: The policy will help reinforce falling costs for clean energy.

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Why the Clean Power Plan is good for business

How to win reputation and influence positive impact

December 2, 2017 by  
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A 21st-century executive’s guide to connecting corporate citizenship with business purpose — and the 10 questions you need to ask your all-star team.

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How to win reputation and influence positive impact

100% biodegradable, edible packaging is so much better than plastic

November 29, 2017 by  
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The world is awash in pollution from plastic packaging – but fortunately, some people are working hard to develop viable eco-friendly alternatives. Indonesia -based Evoware makes food packaging out of an unexpected material: seaweed . Instead of clogging our oceans, the non-toxic seaweed-based packaging biodegrades – and it’s even edible. Evoware’s 100 percent biodegradable packaging lasts for two years on the shelf, and is printable and heat sealable. It’s also a natural plant fertilizer. You can eat the packaging, taking advantage of the high fiber, mineral, and vitamin content. It could serve as a hamburger wrapping, for example, and there’d be no need to remove the packaging before eating the burger. Or it could hold instant noodle seasoning, and when a consumer poured in warm water to make the noodles, the packaging would dissolve. Evoware on their website describes their product as “almost tasteless and odorless.” The seaweed packaging can also form sachets to hold non-food items such as soap or sanitary pads. Related: Egyptian scientists turn dried shrimp shells into eco-friendly plastic Environmental challenges motivate the company, as Indonesia is the second largest contributor of ocean plastic . But co-founder David Christian said in a video they also aim to help poor seaweed farmers in the country. Indonesia is the biggest seaweed-producing country, according to Christian – but many of the farmers, due to a long marketing chain, don’t make enough money or are in debt to loan sharks. Their children are malnourished and can’t attend school. And unfortunately, a lot of the seaweed is wasted right now, he added. Evoware aims to use it, and increase these farmers’ incomes by turning seaweed into zero waste packaging. The company said on their website, “Through Evoware’s products, people evolve to be closer to nature and live a more responsible and sustainable life.” You can find out more here . + Evoware Images via Evoware

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100% biodegradable, edible packaging is so much better than plastic

How scaly dinosaurs turned into feathery birds – new gene study offers clues

November 29, 2017 by  
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Dinosaurs no longer roam the planet – unless you count birds . Recent discoveries have revealed many dinosaurs once had feathers , and birds are actually dinosaurs that have evolved over time. But we don’t really know how feathers evolved. A recent study led by University of Southern California (USC) researchers involving alligator and chicken genes may offer new insight. Feathers and scales are comprised of keratin, and both are part of skin growth, so scientists have surmised they might have a shared evolutionary history. But the nature of that history is still a mystery. A dinosaur unearthed in 2014 in Siberia appeared to possess feather-like filaments, some growing out of scales – leading researchers to think feather-like structures might have evolved from modified scales. So the USC-led team took genes they think might be important in the development of feathers and had them expressed in chicken and alligator embryos while feathers and scales, respectively, developed. They also identified new genes that regulate the development genes and altered the amount of their activity, according to The Guardian . Related: New details of feathered dinosaur could elucidate the origins of flight The researchers produced new types of modified scales, revealing relatively simple changes to some genes can cause alligator early scale development to produce things like the ancestral feathers of non-avian dinosaurs. The Guardian said it’s not a large step from the feather-like structures to something similar to a true early feather. Add the idea that early proto-feathers that gave advantages to their owners would have developed more under natural selection , and it’s not a massive leap to suggest feathers could have formed rather easily. Modifying genes in chickens led to an array of feather forms, including ones seen in dinosaurs, narrowing the gap between feather and scale from a creature with feathers. We still have a long way to go in our understanding, but this recent work could offer some clues. More gene tweaks could potentially reveal the pathway from scale to feather. The journal Molecular Biology and Evolution published the research this month; scientists from institutions in Taiwan, China, and Louisiana contributed to the work. Via The Guardian Images via Depositphotos and PublicDomainPictures.net

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How scaly dinosaurs turned into feathery birds – new gene study offers clues

The ‘multicapital’ scorecard measures the triple bottom line

November 18, 2017 by  
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A new management approach offers businesses a performance measurement model that can indicate how far an organization is from performing sustainably.

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The ‘multicapital’ scorecard measures the triple bottom line

Harrison Ford: The greatest threat is that people in charge don’t believe in science

November 16, 2017 by  
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Take it from Indiana Jones (or Han Solo, or Rick Deckard) — doubting climate change is dangerous. The actor who played all of these characters, Harrison Ford recently gave a speech at the 30th anniversary gala for Conservation International  (CI). After receiving the Founders’ Award at the ceremony in Culver City, the outspoken advocate for ecological and environmental protection expressed his frustration with Trump — albeit indirectly. The vice-chair of CI said, “We face an unprecedented moment in this country. Today’s greatest threat is not climate change, not pollution , not flood or fire. It’s that we’ve got people in charge of important shit who don’t believe in science .” As IFLScience points out, it is hard to disagree with his assessment. Though 97 percent of climate scientists agree that global warming is a real phenomenon that poses great threats, the Trump administration — led by President Donald Trump — has downplayed the veracity that global warming is real and worrisome. To make matters worse, the administration hasn’t just ignored the science — it has outright attacked scientists and the field’s various branches. Related: Major climate science denial group admits to using false temperature data “I’m here tonight for one reason: I care deeply for the natural world . It’s not about me, it’s not about me at all, it’s about this other world we’re going to leave behind,” Ford continued. “If we don’t stop the destruction of nature, nothing else will matter. Jobs won’t matter, our economies won’t matter, our freedoms and ethics won’t matter, our children’s education and potential won’t matter, peace , prosperity.” “If we end the ability of a healthy natural world to sustain humanity nothing else will matter, simply said. For decades, Ford has advocated for sustainable change. He has met with lawmakers, businesses, and communities to discuss how improvements can be made to conservation policies and practices, according to the Hollywood Reporter . Now, he’s fed up with politicians dragging their feet and is using his platform to speak out and raise awareness. Ford concluded, “Other than my family, doing this work has been the most important thing of my life. Nature doesn’t need people, people need nature.” Via Hollywood Reporter, IFLScience Images via Wikimedia Commons,  Flickr

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Harrison Ford: The greatest threat is that people in charge don’t believe in science

Suspicious radioactive cloud over Europe may have originated in Russia

November 16, 2017 by  
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A radioactive cloud of pollution sounds like a plot point out of a B movie – but that’s what multiple European monitoring stations recently detected. Official monitors in Germany and France detected ruthenium 106, a nuclide, in late September, and some people suggested it originated in Kazakhstan or southern Russia . Multiple European monitoring stations confirmed the presence of ruthenium 106, according to France’s Institute for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety , in the atmosphere of the majority of countries in Europe. The cause for alarm appears to have drifted away for now: the institute said since October 13, they have not detected ruthenium 106 in France. They said in a recent statement , “The concentration levels of ruthenium 106 in the air that have been recorded in Europe and especially in France are of no consequence for human health and for the environment .” Related: UNEP chief: Polluters should pay for environmental destruction, not taxpayers But there is some question over how much ruthenium 106 leaked in the first place. The institute said the amounts at the source would have been significant. If such an accident had occurred in France, authorities would have had to implement measures to protect populations for a few kilometers around the point of release. Where did the ruthenium 106 come from? Germany’s Federal Office for Radiation Protection said on October 11 , “Recent analyses as to the source of the radioactive substance suggest a high probability of a radioactive release in the Southern Ural, although other areas in the South of Russia still cannot be ruled out.” Just a few days earlier, on October 8, they’d said in a statement “Russia must be assumed to be the region of origin” and called on Russian authorities to provide information. The German and French agencies did not think the ruthenium 106 came from a nuclear reactor accident, as other nuclides probably would have been detected in such an event. France’s institute said the source could have been “nuclear fuel-cycle facilities or radioactive source production.” French agency senior official Jean-Christophe Gariel said he talked to counterparts in Russia last week, and “they told us that our results were coherent and correct, but that they were not aware of any event that could have caused that.” Via The New York Times , the Institute for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety , and the Federal Office for Radiation Protection ( 1 , 2 ) Images via Depositphotos and Institute for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety

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Suspicious radioactive cloud over Europe may have originated in Russia

How Starbucks brewed a stronger sustainability bond

November 16, 2017 by  
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It’s been a year since the coffee giant issued the first bond of its kind. What’s the effect on the marketplace, and what’s next?

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How Starbucks brewed a stronger sustainability bond

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