14 apps to help you live a more eco-friendly sustainable lifestyle

July 11, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green, Recycle

So you’ve made the choice to start living more sustainably. That’s great! Figuring out how to start can be daunting, but luckily technology is here to help. These handy resources can fit in your pocket and serve as a reminder to continue your journey towards a more sustainable, greener life— whether you’re an experienced advocate for sustainability or just starting out. Related: The pros and cons of online versus in-store shopping Forest Forest lets you combine mindfulness, productivity and focus with real-life tree planting. By not checking your phone for a designated amount of time, the app lets you grow virtual trees , which can then be exchanged for actual trees planted throughout five African countries by Trees for the Future . Tap Plastic bottles are one of the greatest sources of plastic pollution in our oceans, and switching to a reusable water bottle is a simple way to reduce waste. Tap accesses your location and lets you find water refill stations nearby so you can fill up without creating any plastic garbage . HowGood HowGood has a database of 200,000 food product ratings to help users make more sustainable choices. With each product rated by growing guidelines, processing practices and company conduct, this app is a great tool for users who want to be more mindful about what they eat by choosing food that is ethically produced and environmentally friendly with minimal processing.  JouleBug JouleBug combines the best parts of sustainable living with social interaction and saving money on your utility bill. The app allows users to competitively track and score their sustainable habits and share them with friends. JouleBug also includes suggestions and tips for small changes that can help you live a more sustainable lifestyle .  ThredUp Making sure that less of your used clothes end up in a landfill by offering them up to other consumers first is a no-brainer. ThredUp is an online consignment store where you can take pictures of your clothes and sell them through the app. Related: Your guide to eco-friendly toothpastes OfferUp A simple way to buy and sell used items, OfferUp lets users find a new home for their unwanted items instead of the trash can. It only takes a few minutes to snap a photo of your item, post it on the app and connect with potential buyers. You can securely message through the app and check people’s profiles and transaction history as well.  PaperKarma Not only is junk mail super annoying, it’s wasteful and bad for the environment. With PaperKarma you can stop the actual physical junk mail that shows up in your mailbox and forces you to throw away good paper for no reason. Within the app, you simply snap a photo of your junk mail and received an unsubscribed notification about 24 hours later. Olio We throw away billions of pounds of food away every year in the United States— equal to 30-40 percent of our food supply. With Olio, users can connect with neighbors and local businesses to share food. Whether you’ve bought too much of something, prepared too much dinner or purged your fridge before vacation , making sure precious food doesn’t go to waste is easier than you think. DoneGood DoneGood helps you find ethical brands with ease through both an app on your phone and an extension for your internet browser. As you search and shop for products, DoneGood will create pop-up suggestions for alternatives offered by ethical stores. You can also align suggestions based on your personal passions. DoneGood selects their businesses based on things like eco-friendly , non-toxic, cruelty-free, organic, diversity and giving back.  No Waste Track and reduce your food waste with No Waste, an interactive organizational app that lets you make an inventory of the items in your fridge, freezer and pantry. You’ll be able to sort and search for food by category or expiration date to ensure that nothing goes to waste and share your lists with friends or family.  Oroeco Oroeco puts a carbon value on everything from what you buy to the food you eat and even to the appliances you use at home. The app has partnered with UC Berkeley’s CoolClimate research group to compare their users’ carbon values with their neighbors and friends, while providing them with personalized tips to help reduce their energy use and carbon footprints. The app also works with Impact Carbon , a non-profit that helps underdeveloped countries access energy-efficient appliances.  Sustainability Aware In order to ensure a brighter future for the earth, teaching our children about green living and sustainability will be paramount. That’s where Sustainability Aware comes it. A series of educational apps designed for children that teach about the environment and human impact, all in a fun, engaging way. Each app is made for a specific grade level and age group. iRecycle Proper recycling is a simple concept, but isn’t always simple to execute. The iRecycle app finds the closest opportunity to recycle based on your location. Whether you are looking for a recycling center near your home or find yourself walking down the street with an empty water bottle, iRecycle can help.  SDGs in Action Keep up to date on worldwide sustainable development news and learn about the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) with this app. The SDGs are basically a world to-do list to address poverty, climate change and inequality by the year 2030. Users can personalize the app to receive notifications about specific goals and find nearby events to help show support. Screenshots via Inhabitat. Image via picjumbo.com

Read the original post: 
14 apps to help you live a more eco-friendly sustainable lifestyle

Prym Fashion unveils eco-friendly clothing snaps made from plants and recycled bottles

July 1, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Prym Fashion unveils eco-friendly clothing snaps made from plants and recycled bottles

The fashion industry is well-known for wasteful practices in manufacturing, including excessive water consumption and chemical run-off. The fast fashion trend has lead to massive amounts of clothing waste that are not worthy of donating or recycling. In many cases, sourcing materials is a matter of finding what is cheap regardless of the effect on the planet. However, Prym Fashion takes materials seriously with a laser focus on every detail, right down to the snap on your favorite shirt. While we are seeing a trend toward incorporating more sustainable fabrics into clothing, the smaller details such as snaps can have just as large of a manufacturing and waste impact as larger fashion components. But sustainable materials can sometimes be difficult to find. The Prym Fashion L.I.F.E (Low Impact Fastener Ensemble)-certified snaps offer clothing manufacturers a solution to this problem. Related: This backpack is made from locally sourced cork and recycled materials “We understand that today’s consumers expect brands to offer products that are completely sustainable, including the fabric and the trim,” said Brian Moore, chief executive officer of Prym Fashion. “These eco-friendly snaps allow our customers to consider every detail and increase the overall sustainability of their products.” The snaps, available in EcoWhite or EcoGreen, offer earth-friendly solutions for sportswear, outdoor performance apparel and children’s and babies’ wear manufacturers. The EcoWhite snaps are made from recycled water bottles to eliminate the use of crude oil used in the production of virgin products, a process that also diverts single-use plastic from the waste stream. A single water bottle can produce 13 snaps. The EcoGreen snap is green in color but also green because it is sourced from plant materials, such as potato starch. As a result, this snap is both biodegradable and recyclable. An EcoBlue snap is on the horizon, which will source recycled ocean plastic for production. “As brands and retailers in the textile industry continue to raise their sustainability goals, details like trim will become increasingly important,” added Moore. “Prym Fashion is committed to making snaps that make a difference.” + Prym Fashion Images via Prym Fashion

See the original post here:
Prym Fashion unveils eco-friendly clothing snaps made from plants and recycled bottles

Palm Beach, Florida bans single-use plastic bags and polystyrene containers

July 1, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Palm Beach, Florida bans single-use plastic bags and polystyrene containers

Palm Beach, Florida has become the first town in Palm Beach County to officially ban single-use plastic bags and polystyrene containers (also known as Styrofoam containers). The ban on these items will go into effect on December 12, 2019 in order to allow businesses and vendors to use up their current inventory and start switching to more sustainable options. The town council voted to pass the ban in June and will enforce the regulations in restaurants, gas stations, drug stores and grocery stores. Private events and caterers will also have to abide by the restrictions. Town manager Kirk Blouin told the local paper, “The research has shown us these items are bad for the environment, particularly marine life , and it just makes sense to regulate it.” Related: Pacific Island Vanuatu is the first to ban disposable diapers Blouin also noted that although people are very dependent on these convenient plastic items, it is just out of habit and not necessity — and habits can change. “We are all creatures of habit,” he said. “Once we get used to a good habit, it becomes second nature to us.” Many local businesses were already on board with the measure and had ceased offering customers single-use bags as well as other items such as plastic straws and stirrers. Especially for a coastal town, these plastic items do not biodegrade and often end up on beaches and in the ocean, where they break down into microplastic particles. Microplastics are known to cause problems for marine life, and debris is unsightly on beaches. According to the Friends of Palm Beach, a clean-up group in the area, they have already cleared away 120,000 pounds of trash in their clean-ups since 2013. Over 75 percent of all trash collected from the beaches has been plastic waste that ends up in landfills or washes out to sea. Via The Hill and Palm Beach Post Image via Shutterstock

Excerpt from:
Palm Beach, Florida bans single-use plastic bags and polystyrene containers

Sustainably-sourced sunglasses built to last a lifetime rather than a season

June 26, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Sustainably-sourced sunglasses built to last a lifetime rather than a season

Living a sustainable lifestyle is about more than backyard composting and prolific use of Mason jars in lieu of plastic. To truly reach any level of sustainability we need to be aware of every purchase we make including how the product was made and even the packaging used. Although our conscientious purchasing decisions carry weight, corporate responsibility is where the real change will occur — enter Just Human. Just Human feels the burden of that responsibility and has decided to do something about it in the form of long-lasting, quality sunglasses built to last a lifetime, not a season. Related: These sustainable sunglasses smell like coffee and decompose into fertilizer The creation of the sunglasses released earlier this year began with four principals: Focus on the entire system of product creation, from materials to manufacturing to packaging. Streamline the design so that there are only a few products in production, each with a unisex design to serve as many people as possible. Combine function and fashion with a high-performing lens. Focus on durability for a product that won’t end up in the landfill anytime soon. Rather than relying on cheap synthetic materials that have become mainstream in the industry, Just Human sources material for the frames from softwood trees that are sustainably harvested and have earned FSC certification. The glass lenses are made from sand and minerals instead of petroleum-based plastic. Even the cutoffs from lens production are recycled and used for the next round of lens material. Pineapple leaf fibers (we’re hearing a lot about these lately!) and recycled water bottles make up the material for the case that house the sunglasses. The included cleaning cloth is produced using fabric made from 2.5 plastic water bottles . Carrying the eco-friendly idea through to the packaging, Just Human uses 100 percent post-consumer cardboard, eco-friendly inks and compostable tape made from wood pulp. Just Human understands that a focus on sustainability is a mute point if the product doesn’t meet the needs of the consumer so they’ve aimed to combine that focus with function and fashion. Incorporating sports technology into the lens allows them to filter out damaging UVs and glare while providing heat and scratch resistance. In the end, the goal is to provide a luxury product that will endure decades of use without impacting the planet . Wouldn’t it be nice if more companies adopted this simple philosophy? + Just Human Images via Just Human

Read the rest here: 
Sustainably-sourced sunglasses built to last a lifetime rather than a season

Maven Moment: Sustainability Lessons From WWII

June 26, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Maven Moment: Sustainability Lessons From WWII

The Fourth of July is right around the corner, and … The post Maven Moment: Sustainability Lessons From WWII appeared first on Earth911.com.

Read the rest here:
Maven Moment: Sustainability Lessons From WWII

McDonalds creates McHives to raise awareness of the world’s decreasing bee populations

May 28, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on McDonalds creates McHives to raise awareness of the world’s decreasing bee populations

Although McDonald’s restaurants are ubiquitous around the world, the popular fast food eateries in Sweden are currently expanding to meet the needs of tiny little clients that have an immeasurable impact on our world — honey bees. As part of a country-wide initiative to raise awareness about the world’s dwindling bee population , various franchises in Sweden are installing fully-functional beehives, known as McHives, on their rooftops. Brainchild of creative agency NORD DDB , the McHive initiative started last year when one McDonald’s franchise owner, Christina Richter, decided to place a small beehive on the restaurant’s rooftop. Now, in collaboration with McDonald’s sustainability office in Sweden, additional franchise owners have decided to follow Richter’s lead and install the 16-inch hives on their own roofs. Related: IKEA teams up with London artists to upcycle old furniture into funky abodes for birds, bees and bats The innovative beehives were designed and built by award winning set designer Nicklas Nilsson. Built to scale, the beekeeping box hives are remarkable in their realistic appearance, complete with the restaurant’s signature Golden Arches. Bees enter the structure through the main entrance and can even enjoy outdoor seating, or if they’re really in a hurry, they can swing by the mini drive-thru. Although there are currently five franchises with McHives on their roofs throughout the country, the first hive was recently auctioned for charity , raising more than $10,000 dollars for the Ronald McDonald House. Christoffer Rönnblad, Marketing director of McDonald’s Sweden, explained that the company was thrilled to join forces with the individual franchises in the name of sustainability . “We have a lot of really devoted franchisees who contribute to our sustainability work, and it feels good that we can use our size to amplify such a great idea as beehives on the rooftops,” Rönnblad said. “This miniature McDonald’s is a tribute to franchisee Christina Richter’s initiative.” + Nord DDB Via Adweek Images via McDonald’s

View original here:
McDonalds creates McHives to raise awareness of the world’s decreasing bee populations

Interview: Link Privacy And Sustainability To Reset The Economy

May 28, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Eco

Comments Off on Interview: Link Privacy And Sustainability To Reset The Economy

Mitch Ratcliffe of Earth911 has another conversation with Swedish private … The post Interview: Link Privacy And Sustainability To Reset The Economy appeared first on Earth911.com.

Go here to read the rest:
Interview: Link Privacy And Sustainability To Reset The Economy

Debunking Electric Vehicle Myths

May 28, 2019 by  
Filed under Eco

Comments Off on Debunking Electric Vehicle Myths

Electric vehicles provide a more sustainable option to personal transportation … The post Debunking Electric Vehicle Myths appeared first on Earth911.com.

Go here to read the rest:
Debunking Electric Vehicle Myths

Podcast: Earth911’s Mitch Ratcliffe Talks Privacy and Sustainability

May 10, 2019 by  
Filed under Business, Eco

Comments Off on Podcast: Earth911’s Mitch Ratcliffe Talks Privacy and Sustainability

idka.com, a Swedish privacy-based social network, asked Earth911’s Mitch Ratcliffe … The post Podcast: Earth911’s Mitch Ratcliffe Talks Privacy and Sustainability appeared first on Earth911.com.

Read more from the original source:
Podcast: Earth911’s Mitch Ratcliffe Talks Privacy and Sustainability

This beautiful charred timber lake house extension in Munich is chemical-free

May 3, 2019 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on This beautiful charred timber lake house extension in Munich is chemical-free

German architect studio, Buero Wagner , designed a modern, chemical-free home using a twist on the traditional Japanese practice of charring wood. The Black House is located near Munich’s Lake Ammersee and features a rural German architecture with a sleek industrial design. It is an addition to an existing family home and uses the site’s natural topography to create a stacked look on the exterior with a fluid, open concept inside. The charred timber façade is a popular trend in Western architecture and uses a sustainable Japanese practice that creates weather-proof wood through a fire-treatment process. The black house has three levels, with the bedroom and open bathroom in the basement level, kitchen and dining in the middle and a living room at the top, all connected by short steps to create modular but overlapping spaces. Related: Black charred-timber home embraces forest views in Zürich “Spaces and uses form one fluid entity, creating a variety of spatial situations,” said Buero Wagner. Perhaps the most dramatic design element to the house is the pivoting windows on the northwest corner of the living room space. Virtually the entire northern and western walls pivot on an off-center single axis and open up onto the terrace — creating one seamless and open space for hosting. This space also builds a connection from the interior to a small forest outside. The concrete flooring blends seamlessly with the concrete terrace, creating an entirely new, hybrid and open-air space, without a clear line between inside and outside. The house most notably uses a charred wood façade that has a resurgence of popularity in Western architecture. The wood is fire treated and then coated with a natural oil. The result is a jet-black, charcoal aesthetic that is naturally weatherproof. Charred wood is carbonized, which means it is resistant to water , fire, bugs, sun and rot. Despite the charred wood ’s resistant properties, it can be a difficult and tedious process to fire-treat and install. The interior walls and floor utilize an untreated oiled oak combined with slabs of exposed, sandblasted concrete. Together, these materials give the interior an industrial and modern look. A panel heating system is incorporated into the concrete walls and floors, and provides energy efficient  thermal energy storage. + Buero Wagner Via Dezeen Images via Buero Wagner

View post:
This beautiful charred timber lake house extension in Munich is chemical-free

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 1694 access attempts in the last 7 days.