AUDIs new electric car will have autonomous vehicle capability and a roof that holds real plants

May 15, 2019 by  
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AUDI revealed the concept for a new electric car with autonomous driving capabilities at Auto Shanghai 2019, and this vehicle really pushes the limits when it comes to connecting technology with nature. Apart from the AI technology implemented to take most of the effort out of driving in general, the AI:ME autonomous vehicle is completely electric. On the interior of the car, a wooden pergola roof allows climbing plants to grow and thrive. According to the company, the AUDI AI systems are “capable of learning and thinking, while also being proactive and personal. Thanks to Audi AI, models bearing the four rings will be both intelligent and empathetic in the future. They will be able to continually interact with their surroundings and passengers, and thus adapt themselves in a better way than ever before to the requirements of those on board.” That’s some serious evolution. Related: AUDI unveils two new swanky self-driving concepts in Frankfurt The autonomous driving capabilities go up to level four on the AI:ME, meaning that though the system doesn’t require any assistance from the driver themselves, it is limited to certain regions, such as highways or specific areas in inner cities. The uncommonly raised headlights will be used to alert other drivers and pedestrians to the presence of the car, rather than as a tool to illuminate the road (unnecessary, as the occupants of the car won’t be driving). The interior has plenty of storage space — a must for autonomous cars, as the passengers will need ample room to do whatever they’re doing instead of driving. Rather than pedals, the AUDI AI:ME has comfortable footrests, and the seats prioritize comfort over function. A 3D monitor with VR goggles allows for everything from watching movies to interactive gaming while in the car , and the high-quality audio system combined with the noise-canceling interior makes outside traffic noise a thing of the past. As for the “green” roof , this is a first for the automobile industry. The designers used filigree wooden struts to construct a pergola above the interior roof surface, giving it the ability to hold living plants. AUDI not only wanted to create a connection between the driver and nature with this innovation but also to improve the air quality within the car (advanced air filters also remove outside odors from traffic and the city). The AI tech uses intelligent algorithms to monitor stress levels of the car’s occupants. This helps the car itself to actually get to know the driver, therefore improving their experience, whether it be preferred temperatures or seat adjustments. + Audi Images via Audi

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AUDIs new electric car will have autonomous vehicle capability and a roof that holds real plants

UN lists plastic as hazardous waste, votes to control international trade

May 15, 2019 by  
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On May 10, 187 countries voted to list plastic as hazardous waste and tighten control over its international trade. The governing agreement, the Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and Their Disposal dictates legally binding standards for importing and exporting toxic materials. For the first time ever, the agreement now includes plastic , with the exception of PE, PP and PET plastics. The new agreement gives lower income countries — particularly Southeast Asian countries — more control over the indiscriminate dumping of toxic materials. “This is a crucial first step toward stopping the use of developing countries as a dumping ground for the world’s plastic waste , especially those coming from rich nations,” said Von Hernandez from Break Free From Plastic. European nations and the U.S. export waste to African and Asian countries as a way to dispose of their trash and hazardous materials. Sometimes these countries are paid for their recycling or landfill services, but many times the dumping happens without permission. Under the Basel Convention agreement, export countries must receive written permits before dumping hazardous waste, which now includes most contaminated, mixed and non-recyclable plastic . Related: A guide to the different types of plastic In 2018, China banned imports of plastic waste and nearby countries Vietnam, Indonesia and Thailand saw a massive upsurge in dumping. With China no longer an option, the $200 billion global recycling industry suddenly had no buyers that could handle the scale of the world’s plastic addiction. Ports in the U.S. and Europe began to overflow with plastic while exporters struggled to find new dumping sites. The U.S. is not a member of the Basel Convention and therefore could not participate in the vote. As the largest exporter of plastic, however, it will be required to obtain permits when dumping in participating countries. The American Chemistry Council and Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries were among the outspoken opponents, arguing these new obstacles will hinder recycling programs. One million citizens around the world signed online petitions in support of the new agreement. “Plastic waste is acknowledged as one of the world’s most pressing environmental issues,”  said Rolph Payet , executive secretary of the convention. “The fact that this week close to 1 million people around the world signed a petition urging Basel Convention Parties to take action here in Geneva at the COPs is a sign that public awareness and desire for action is high.” + UN Environment Via Plastic Pollution Convention and CNN Image via Jasmin Sessler

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UN lists plastic as hazardous waste, votes to control international trade

Power and publicity trump protection in large marine protected areas

May 15, 2019 by  
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Nations have just one more year to reach the global marine conservation goal to protect 10 percent of the world’s oceans by 2020. Although 7 percent is already legally protected, many new declarations are massive, offshore areas. Some conservationists argue these offshore achievements fail to protect more critical coastal waters and may even be aggressive ocean-grabs by colonial powers. The goal to legally protect 10 percent of the ocean was ratified under the Convention of Biological Diversity in 2010, and in 2015 it was added to the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals. According to the World Database of Protected Areas , although 7 percent of the ocean is protected, only 20 marine protected areas account for 70 percent of that area. Offshore areas have significantly fewer stressors than coastal areas, including fishing, tourism, development and mining and host considerably less biodiversity. By contrast, coastal coral reefs are home to 25 percent of all marine species. Related: Drones — the future of ocean conservation Because of the diversity in both uses and species, governments have a difficult time finding compromises to effectively declare and sustainably manage coastal areas, but they can easily make headlines and reach their targets by sectioning off large areas of deep sea. The colonization of marine protected areas Ecological concerns are not the only issue. Many critics also believe political — and colonial — power dynamics are behind these declarations. In recent years, the United States, Britain and France have declared large protected areas in their island territories, while declaring very few at home. The U.S. has less than 1 percent of continental waters under legal designation, while 43 percent of its colonial ocean territories are under protected status. England has just 2.9 square miles of marine protected areas but controls 1.5 million square miles around its territories. Control and displacement in the Indian Ocean In the 1960s, Britain maintained the Chagos Archipelago islands in the Indian Ocean, even after granting independence to nearby Mauritius. In order to make a naval base, the British forcibly removed 2,000 citizens who have spent decades demanding to be allowed to return to their homeland and continue their traditional fishing practices. In 2010, Britain declared the islands a protected area, and suddenly, peoples’ traditions became a crime. Despite official claims that the protected area had nothing to do with preventing displaced people from returning to their homeland, leaked documents revealed an explicit connection to this motive. In 2019, the International Court of Justice at The Hague declared Britain’s actions wrongful and ordered the island to be handed back to Mauritius. Why prioritize coastal areas? Larger protected areas are praised for their ability to preserve more space for migratory species like whales and tuna and for protecting deep sea areas from future exploitation. The problem, however, is when large offshore declarations distract attention from the harder work of protecting coastal zones. The declaration of protected or managed coastal areas requires compromise from many different stakeholders, including transportation, businesses, hotels, local fishers and coastal residents. Unsustainable development, pollution and competing interests exacerbate environmental degradation in coastal areas and require explicit management legislation and compliance — a feat that many governments lack the capacity to take on. In fact, only 5 percent of all marine protected areas have implemented management plans. Enric Sala, a marine ecologist with the National Geographic Society,  argues that protected area declarations that aren’t accompanied by management plans are “false and counterproductive” achievements that look good on paper but do nothing to protect the long-term sustainability of ocean resources. Money and management The lack of local government resources and investment means that the majority of marine conservation activities are funded and implemented by foreign conservation groups and private philanthropists — the majority of whom are American. According to Fred Pearch, a journalist with Yale Environment 360, “Some see such philanthropists as planetary saviors; others as agents of a creeping privatization of one of the last great global commons.” Again, foreign powers have jurisdiction and decision-making power over foreign waters and what indigenous communities can and cannot do. Many local groups are pushing back against this invasion. John Aini, an indigenous leader in Papau New Guinea explained in an interview with MongaBay about the decolonization of marine conservation: “I’ve basically given up working with big international nongovernmental organizations, basically given up networking with them. And we are doing our own thing now with funding that’s available, and funding from people that understand that we are in touch, that we own the land, the sea, we know the problems of our people better.” What is the right way to protect the ocean? There is no one-size-fits-all solution and no way to make all marine conservationists and ocean users agree, but positive examples of protected areas do exist. Last year, Honduras declared a marine protected area in Tela Bay, which includes 86,259 hectares of coral reef. Although it is relatively small at only 300 square miles, the coastal protected area is a model for its outreach strategy, local management committee and “managed-access fishery” program that supports coastal residents. Belize also became the first country to implement a nationwide, multi-species fishing rights program for small-scale local fishers that is incorporated into the country’s intricate network of protected and locally managed areas. The key to successful legal protections is more science- and community-based conservation, not what New York Times contributor Luiz A. Rocha calls “convenient conservation” to meet numbers, make headlines and ignore realities and power dynamics on the ground — and under the sea. Via Yale Environment 360 Images from Bureau of Land Management , Arnaud Abadie , Dronepicr , Drew Avery , USGS Unmanned Aircraft Systems , Daniel Julie and Fred

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Power and publicity trump protection in large marine protected areas

SCAD students fight food insecurity in Georgia with organic farming and beekeeping

May 15, 2019 by  
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For a break from schoolwork, students at the Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD) have been swapping their laptops for shovels and seedlings at SCAD Back40, the university’s new one-acre “farm.” Created as a legacy project to celebrate SCAD’s 40th anniversary, the agricultural initiative features a wide range of seasonal, organically grown crops as well as a growing apiary with 16 beehives actively managed by students. Produce is regularly donated to America’s Second Harvest of Coastal Georgia, with 1,000 units of leafy greens sent to the non-profit food back in the fall and winter quarters of 2018. Located in Hardeeville, South Carolina across the bridge from Savannah, Georgia, Back40 occupies rural land just a short drive from the bustle of cars and urban life. Back40 Project Manager Jody Elizabeth Trumbull oversees the agricultural initiative with the help of student volunteers from varying backgrounds, ranging from UX design to architecture. Because Back40 employs active crop rotation methods, soil management, companion planting and other natural growing methods —  organic certification is currently in progress — for producing seasonal crops, SCAD prefers to call the project a “farm” rather than a “garden.” The one-acre plot has the potential to grow up to five acres. While Back40 has yet to incorporate livestock and poultry, it does feature an apiary with 16 honey-producing hives and nearly 350,000 bees. Each hive can produce 80 to 100 pounds of honey. In addition to supporting the declining bee population, the apiary fits with SCAD’s image — the university’s mascot is the bee. To provide enough food for both managed and native bees, SCAD has planted a wide range of flowers to support both bee populations. When wild beehives are found on campus buildings, they are safely removed and relocated to the apiary. Related: SCAD artist turns recycled materials into giant puppets to revitalize a historic French village Back40 produced 1,000 units of kale, Brussels sprouts, radishes, shard, cardoon and three types of lettuce in the first two quarters of operation. Part of the yield is donated to America’s Second Harvest of Coastal Georgia to help fight food insecurity, while the remaining produce is used at SCAD dining venues. As an educational tool for conservation, Back40 offers learning experiences not just for its students, but for local schools and organizations as well. In the future, the urban farm’s non-food commodity items will also be used in SCAD fine arts and design programs, such as the new business of beauty and fragrance program. + Savannah College of Art and Design Images via SCAD

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SCAD students fight food insecurity in Georgia with organic farming and beekeeping

A series of cylindrical volumes break up this modernist home in Mexico

March 27, 2019 by  
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Merida-based architecture firm Garrido Lizarraga Arquitectos has unveiled a gorgeous,  modernist home comprised of a low-lying structure interspersed by several cylindrical volumes. Marked by clean, simple lines, white cladding and natural light, the contemporary House O + I is 1,776 square feet of pure, unadulterated sophistication. Located in Merida, Mexico, the family residence is set on an expansive plot of land, which inspired the incredible design. To take advantage of the building site, the architects opted to create an elongated, low-lying volume with an open floor plan. This strategy, according to the design firm, would allow the home owners to enjoy multiple perspectives of the natural surroundings from virtually any angle. Related: Award-winning Palm Springs home embraces the California climate in sustainable style The two-bedroom home is clad in smooth, all-white surfaces, both on the interior and exterior, that contrast with the existing rustic environment. Additionally, the home’s modernist aesthetic is enhanced with long, angular cutouts and various cylindrical volumes that rise up over the main structure’s roof line. The cylindrical volumes separate the home according to use, with one side housing the communal areas and the other side containing the two bedrooms. Clean, simple lines define the interior space, which, like the exterior, is clad in smooth, white surfaces. However, to create a bit of contrast, the architects used chukum, a limestone-based, red-hued stucco mixed with resin from chukum trees, to bring in hints of nature into the interior, from accent walls to bathroom features. At the heart of the home is the south-facing living room that leads out to the swimming pool through a series of sliding glass doors. This expansive outdoor space is enclosed with a textured, earthen wall that contrasts nicely with the all-white house. From the large terrace area, a “floating” staircase leads to a rooftop terrace that overlooks the surroundings. + Garrido Lizarraga Arquitectos Via World Architecture Photography by Diego Ayuso via Garrido Lizarraga Arquitectos

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A series of cylindrical volumes break up this modernist home in Mexico

Zaha Hadid Architects break ground on an eco-sensitive multimodal bridge in Taiwan

March 27, 2019 by  
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The world’s longest single-mast, asymmetric cable-stayed bridge has broken ground in northern Taiwan . Not only engineered for minimal visual impact, the bridge is also designed to host a wide range of transit options. Designed by Zaha Hadid Architects , the world record-breaking Danjiang Bridge will span approximately 3,000 feet across the mouth of the Tamsui River. The structure’s single-mast design is also meant to minimize site impact to the riverbed as part of an effort to protect the estuary’s ecosystem and nature reserve. Supported by a single 656-foot-tall concrete pylon, the Danjiang Bridge will connect Bali district and Tamsui district in New Taipei City while improving accessibility between Taipei and Taoyuan International Airport, and will also help reduce traffic in the area by an estimated 30 percent. Along with Sinotech Engineering Consultants and Leonhardt, Andrä and Partner Beratende Ingenieure, Zaha Hadid Architects was approached to design the project after winning an international design competition in 2015 with their proposal for a sleek and minimalist bridge . The proposed bridge includes dedicated lanes for high-occupancy vehicles, motorized vehicles, scooters, bicycles and pedestrians. Bicycle racks and benches will also be installed at intervals across the bridge. Related: Zaha Hadid Architects completes highly complex Nanjing International Youth Cultural Centre Since the estuary has long drawn locals and tourists alike who flock to the coast every day to watch the sun setting over the Taiwan Strait, it was imperative that the slender bridge minimize its visual impact so as not to obstruct views from popular viewing points along the river bank. The bridge is also designed to minimize environmental impact and to accommodate a potential future expansion of the Danhai Light Rail network across the Tamsui River. The Danjiang Bridge has a construction schedule of 68 months and a budget of NT $12.49 billion (U.S. $405.2 million). The project is slated to open in 2024. + Zaha Hadid Architects Renderings by VA and MIR

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Zaha Hadid Architects break ground on an eco-sensitive multimodal bridge in Taiwan

A layer of vegetation wraps around this tower in Adu Dhabi

August 19, 2016 by  
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Extended green verandas stagger in a helical pattern along the exterior of this  residential tower designed by London-based architecture firm Studio Prescient . Thanks to the lush gardens outside, each apartment enjoys a strong connection with nature, water and air, while boasting breathtaking views of the surroundings. The 45-floor tower, designed for Abu Dhabi, features spacious garden apartments that start from the fifth floor up. The organizational approach allowed the architects to free up a significant percentage of the volume for various services and amenities, including a clubhouse and swimming pool. The top five floors also accommodate services and recreational spaces , offering stunning views of the surroundings. Related: Singapore’s Ecological EDITT Tower “The architectural design has sought inspiration from the first principles of life and their correlation with habitats to arrive at the design for this new paradigm in vertical living in consonance with nature,” explained the architects. + Studio Prescient

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A layer of vegetation wraps around this tower in Adu Dhabi

Seven coolest uses of photovoltaic panels

October 11, 2011 by  
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Ankit Dahiya: Uses of photovoltaic panels Coolest uses of photovoltaic panels Introduction The solar voltaic cells are one of the widely used source to produce energy. The energy produced using these photovoltaic cells is completely an eco-friendly energy and has become so popular that every people wants to try their hands on it. This way of producing energy is one of the simplest and easiest ways as you just need a few array of cells to start producing energy. These solar panels are widely used these days to produce energy in some or other way. Here is a list of seven coolest uses of photovoltaic panels that are being used by people across the globe. 1. Solar trash cans Solar trash cans The solar trash can is an idle way of using the solar energy The solar trash can is an idle way of using the solar energy. These trash cans are specially designed in various cities across the globe to reduce the effective impact of trash on the environment and the surroundings. These trash cans are becoming popular as they are solar-energy powered and are provided with more space to store more trash which in turn reduces the emissions and the fuel consumption by a rapid rate of up to 80%. 2. Solar intersections Solar intersections The art is another form of using the photovoltaic cells to generate optimum amount of energy The art is another form of using the photovoltaic cells to generate optimum amount of energy. The art these days is not only to enjoy but also to take a step towards a green and clean environment. These cool site-specific art designs are creatively made keeping in mind the impact of sun’s energy and the ways it can be effectively used to overcome the green house effect and other big problems. 3. Solar crane at Coachella Solar crane at Coachella This solar crane is really awesome and the look it delivers at night time is marvelous This solar crane is really awesome and the look it delivers at night time is marvelous. This is a huge oversized origami installation at Coachella. This was launched at a festive season and it is placed at the entrance to welcome the crowd. This is powered with thousands of LED lights that glow during the night and gives a feel of liveliness. This masterpiece is a living art that conveys a social message of saving energy in some way. 4. Solar pyramids Solar pyramids Solar pyramids are one of the most used methods of generating eco-friendly energy without affecting the surroundings and the environment Solar pyramids are one of the most used methods of generating eco-friendly energy without affecting the surroundings and the environment. This structure of pyramid allows utilizing the maximum of the solar energy and helps in producing large amount of green energy which can be used effectively as an alternative source to a green world. This design has received awards for its unique design and is placed at Abu Dhabi. 5. Solar paint Solar paint Solar Paint is the next thing that can be used as a source of saving our environment Paint is the next thing that can be used as a source of saving our environment. The paint usually contains toxic elements that tend to pollute our surrounding and effects people to a large extent. The solar paint is a best alternative and this paint is a mixture of photovoltaic panels which can be used to paint any surface to create set of cheap and very efficient solar cells. There are further researches being done on this unique way of renewable source of energy and we expect it to be an awesome real concept soon into the market. 6. Solar powered plane Solar powered plane The planes are the next big thing that can be used to generate energy effectively The planes are the next big thing that can be used to generate energy effectively. The sky is the limit for this solar technology. Usually planes consumes plenty of fuel which in turn produces smoke that effects the surrounding. This solar plane is being made keeping in mind the green future and this unique way is highly appreciated. This solar plane can do wonders as it runs on solar energy powered solar cells which reduce the carbon impact on nature. Moreover, these solar energy powered plane can be easily operated and needs the basic installment just like a normal plane. This solar impulse plane is made using 12,000 solar panels which will allow it to run day and night continuously without any problem. 7. Flower power Flower power These solar-powered flowers consume the solar energy and convert it into electrical energy by using photovoltaic cells Flowers have their own magical power. Be it a normal flower which add to the beauty of nature and helps in its shining or the solar powered flowers that acts as an alternate way of producing green energy. One such flower is made completely out of solar photovoltaic cells that not only looks stunning but also generates an awesome amount of energy which can be utilized effectively for some useful purpose. These solar-powered flowers consume the solar energy and convert it into electrical energy by using photovoltaic cells. They too work as natural flowers and provide shade and shelter for various organisms. This concept is really cool and should be followed everywhere.

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Seven coolest uses of photovoltaic panels

Five things to know about biodiesel made from recycled cooking oil

October 4, 2011 by  
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Ravi Kumar: Biodiesel Things to know about biodiesel made from recycled cooking oil Unbelievable but true! One liter of waste cooking oil can contaminate as much as one million liter of water. So, to reduce this fear and to use the cooking oil to the fullest, it can now be recycled and used to produce soap and biodiesel. Once we pour the oil in our vessel, the trash is subjected to throw either in dustbins or drain. But nobody knows this is not only clogging the sewerage and creating wreck havoc on local drains but also affecting wildlife some other way. If you are willing to know about recycling of cooking oil please continue reading this article. In Kilmarnock, Scotland and some other countries, the government has taken a good unique initiative wherein you can now pay for your bus fare by taking used oil to a recycling plant. This will not only help the denizens to play vital role in environment conservation but also keeps encouraging the proper recycling process. 1. How it works According to chemical scientists, “Cooking oil is purified fat of plant origin. It is usually found in liquid form at room temperature.” Proper disposal of used cooking oil is an important waste management concern. It hinders the oxygenation of water as oil is always lighter than water tends to spread into thin and broad membranes. 2. Recycling or Transesterification The chemical process under which cooking oil and kitchen grease goes for recycling is called Transesterification. Later it is converted into biodiesel. It is suggested to not to straight pour cooking oil into gas tank. Scientists have also been doing a lot of research to create some filters to control its evil effects. 3. Choose not to dump in sink Cooking oil should never be dumped into kitchen sink or in toilet bowl. The proper way to dispose of oil is to put it in a sealed non recyclable contained and discard it with regular garbage. Placing the container of oil in the refrigerator to harden also makes disposal easier and less messy. 4. Plumbing clogs sewer First and foremost reason for stooped up sewer pipes is excessive release of cooking oil and kitchen grease. Grease sticks to pipes and it badly chokes the sewerage and disrupted proper sewage flow. One should always keep in mind that it is not a temporary clogging but it is also somewhere affecting our ecology. 5. Can’t mix with motor oil It seems when oil is recycled, be it cooking oil or motor oil, it can be mixed further. But, it is not more than a misconception. You can recycle them separately but never mix recycled cooking oil and motor oil. They are different in nature and substances go through different recycling process and important thing is you will be disabled to extract them again. Use cold water Sometimes it becomes very difficult the kitchen grease to go down the drain. If it is small in amount or little more than that one should immediately shower cold water on it so that it solidifies and the possibilities of sticking in the pipeline decreases. Or else it can cause water contamination and obstruct smooth flow. Drop off points Some specific drop off points to dump cooking oil waste should be made at different points to avoid its disadvantages. Private agencies and some local communities should seriously think over recycling of cooking oil as how it can be provoked. Place it in front position and label it so that everyone can easily access it at home. Key points: Cooking oil may produce biodiesel if not disposed properly. As far as a lay man knows the cooking oil is used in the kitchen to cook the food, and if dieticians are to be believed, the cooking oil and grease harm one’s health too. But, don’t get surprised to know that improper disposal of the fats from our cooking oil can degrade our environment also. If you are somewhere damaging environment or causing ecological imbalance, it amounts to felony of different acts of environment protection and wildlife conservation. To safeguard our surroundings, there are various acts which have been made across most of the countries. Some of those common in almost many countries are: Environment Protection Act Water Prevention and Control of Pollution Act Air Prevention and Control of Pollution Act Wild Life Act Forest Conservation Act

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Five things to know about biodiesel made from recycled cooking oil

Five industries that will suffer the most from global warming

October 4, 2011 by  
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Abhinav Shrivastava: Global Warming Water, water everywhere. Global Warming can be described as the continuous increase in the temperature of the Earth and its water bodies. Humans have polluted the environment by means of deforestation and burning of fossil fuels, thereby increasing the concentration of the greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Global warming would lead to extreme weather and environmental conditions such as earthquakes, drought, tsunamis and floods which would affect mankind in every possible way. People are physically as well as economically suffering from this, with many industries becoming its prey quite rapidly. Some of the industries which are being drastically affected by Global Warming are… 1. Fishing Fishing Industry Rising sea levels mean that livelihoods dependent on the sea will be the worst hit. Oceans play an important role in controlling the global carbon cycle. The oceans have removed about 25% of the carbon content emitted by the humans and almost half of the anthropogenic carbon dioxide released during the starting of the industrial revolution. But now with the increase in carbon emissions the absorbing capacity of the water bodies are getting weaker, which in a drastic way has affected the fishing industry. With water becoming warmer, the fresh water fish and corals are disappearing in an alarming rate. Its has become very difficult for marine organisms like oysters and shrimps to undergo the process of calcification i.e. forming their shells. The fishes have gradually started moving northwards. The change in the patterns of rainfall and the scarcity of water in lakes has drastically affected the sustainability of fisheries and aquaculture. 2. Forestry Forestry The negative effects on forestry and lumbering are not determined yet in their nature and extent. As the forestry industry comprises of both natural and managed systems it’s very hard to state with utmost precision, the effect of climatic change on it. We can only draw conclusions from historical observation, modeling results and experimental models for the time being. The trees species are expected to move to higher altitudes or northward thereby increasing productivity in the North. The concept of “carbon fertilization” shows us that the additional carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has a positive effect on plants. More consumption of carbon dioxide would lead to the production and existence of healthier trees. This, in turn would benefit the timber industry. This would lead to more production and lower price but in another sense, it is hazardous. As the prices would fall people would tend to buy more timber, thereby leading to more deforestation. Moreover, due to global warming, forest fires, storms and pest attacks would became very common leading to the destruction of the forest ecosystem. Global warming and climate change are fallouts of deforestation and thus we see that global warming and deforestation set up a vicious cycle. 3. Wine Wine industry Global warming would give positive effects in the short run but rising temperatures will untimately ruin commercial wine-making. California, France and Spain are the world’s best wine hubs as wine thrives in Mediterranean climate. Now the estimations state that due to global warming, the area suitable for wineries would decrease to half and places like England would become the new heaven for wine making as they would have the perfect temperature for growing it. Though rise in temperature also helps in producing better quality vintage wines, it’s very hard for grapes to grow in the heat. Increase in temperature, low water availability and pest attacks can reduce wine production and the overall quality of wine. 4. Insurance Insurance Industry Future uninsured. Insurance companies have much to fear from global warming. With the rapid change in the climate, the number and extent of natural disasters such as such as earthquakes, floods, drought, hurricanes and tsunamis would increase. It clearly means that insurance companies would have to keep paying more compensation, which in turn, means a complete loss to these companies. Many of these insurance companies have come forward to provide incentives to fight global warming, thereby trying to reduce the dangers of climatic changes on them. 5. Meat Meat Industry Adverse effects on the future. The meat industry is going to suffer highly due to global warming. This industry is responsible for the emission of 18% of greenhouse gases. Moreover, transportation of either the food for the cattle or animal itself causes pollution. Hence, the government is looking for ways to reduce pollution, which would ultimately lead to less consumption of meat, thereby causing loss to this industry.

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Five industries that will suffer the most from global warming

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