The World Surf League is pledging to eliminate single-use plastics and become carbon-neutral by the end of 2019

June 27, 2019 by  
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The World Surf League (WSL)  is known for being the authority for all things surfing, famous for showcasing the most talented professional surfers to the rest of the world. Now, they’ve decided to use that powerful platform to set an example for sports organizations everywhere by committing to substantial environmental initiatives. Earlier in June, the WSL announced a series of pledges that will apply to all WSL Championship Tour and Big Wave Tour events. They include becoming carbon neutral globally by the end of 2019, eliminating single-serve plastics by the end of 2019 and leaving each place better than they found it. The WSL runs more than 230 global surfing events each year. Considering the WSL’s millions of passionate fans, and the organization’s plan to hold competitions throughout Australia, Indonesia, Brazil, South Africa, Tahiti, France, Portugal, California and Hawaii in 2019 alone, these public commitments are bound to inspire others to address critical issues about the state of our environment. Related: Kin Travel is offering unique vacation ideas that benefit destinations through conservation and sustainability Along with the announcement came an expansion of the WSL’s already-active ocean conservation efforts by their launch of a global campaign to “ Stop Trashing Waves ” with its non-profit arm, WSL PURE (“Protecting Understanding and Respecting the Environment”). WSL CEO Sophie Goldschmidt spoke of breaking new ground in the world of sports when it comes to the “urgent battle against climate change and ocean pollution,” saying, “We believe it’s our responsibility to be ‘all in’ with our efforts to protect the ocean and beaches amid the devastating climate crisis we all face. We invite everyone who cares about the ocean to join us.” So how does the WSL plan on carrying out these goals? For starters, the organization is offsetting its carbon footprint by investing in REDD+ and VCS (Verified Carbon Standard) certified carbon offset projects. These projects are focused on restoring and protecting natural and renewable energy ecosystems based in each of the WSL’s operating regions. The WSL will also be making an effort to limit non-essential travel and implement policies to reduce carbon emissions within its offices. 11-time WSL Champion and surfing legend, Kelly Slater, spoke of the announcement with enthusiasm. “I think it’s a great stance and an important message to send to people around the world. The ocean is vital to everyone, for food, for oxygen and especially to us surfers. I think everyone should make it their priority to care about this issue and make changes in their lives to help.” + World Surf League Images via World Surf League

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The World Surf League is pledging to eliminate single-use plastics and become carbon-neutral by the end of 2019

A rustic, surfside home connects a young family to the beach

November 1, 2018 by  
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Surf’s up for a young couple living in the southwestern France surfing mecca of Soorts-Hossegor. Custom-designed by Paris-based firm Java Architecture, ‘Une Maison Pour Surfer’ serves as a home base for the surf-loving couple and their new baby. Keeping within a tight budget and focusing on minimal impact to the environment, the architects created an elongated home using  prefabricated modules . The 1,000-square-foot home was built in collaboration with the homeowners, a young couple who lived in Paris but wanted a vacation home  to relax and spend their time on the coast doing what they love — surfing. Their chosen spot was the idyllic area of Soorts-Hossegor, a popular area for water sports. Related: The Truck Surf Hotel is traveling retreat that hits the best surf spots in Europe and Africa Located on a hilly landscape surrounded by forest, the welcoming family home has a  minimal impact on the natural surroundings. Building on the top of the hill meant that no big trees had to be cut down, and using prefabricated modules allowed the project to have a reduced construction and transportation time, which in return minimized the project’s carbon footprint. Taking on a shed-like appearance, the home is an elongated form with a gabled roof . Clad in thin, dark wood panels, the exterior blends into the surrounding forestscape, virtually camouflaged within the tree canopy. An extra-wide porch serves as the main attraction. Jutting out into the landscape and covered in a corrugated polycarbonate cladding, this space is the most active area for the family. The transparent nature of the structure lets natural light into the home but protects the interior from rain and wind. Although the large porch is the activity center, the interior living space is just as relaxing. Light wooden panels were used to clad the walls and flooring throughout the home. The design scheme uses muted colors and minimal furnishings to create an ultra soothing space that welcomes the family after a long day on the waves. + Java Architecture Via Archdaily Images via Java Architecture

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A rustic, surfside home connects a young family to the beach

Brand new island sprouts off the North Carolina coast

June 28, 2017 by  
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In an age of rising sea levels and shore erosion , the sudden appearance of new coastal land can encourage and inspire. Along North Carolina’s Cape Hatteras National Seashore, a brand new island has emerged from the sea like a plant sprouting from a seed. The sandbar, which has been called Shelley Island by some locals for its abundance of sea shells, is attracting adventurous visitors, who choose to brave the elements and the occasional discarded fish hook so that they may see the shoreline’s newest addition. Shelley Island is located near Cape Point, a globally-renowned surf-fishing location, and Cape Hatteras Lighthouse on North Carolina ‘s Outer Banks. To reach Shelley Island, visitors must pass near powerful currents that could easily pull a person out to sea. “We’re worried about shark bites, but we’re more worried about drownings,” said Bill Smith, president of the North Carolina Beach Buggy Association. Rays and sharks patrol the waters and the discarded hooks from many fish tales could be embedded in the sand, threatening barefoot revelers. Related: Discreet new home in North Carolina acts like a gateway to the surrounding wilderness It is entirely possible that Shelley Island may disappear within a year, or it may expand even further into the ocean. Cape Point is constantly shifting. Admirers of the wild seashore have been fortunate with a particularly accessible season, the better through which to enjoy the scenery. Those who visit should count themselves fortunate, as future generations may not be able to experience this unique and fragile ecosystem . The coastline of North Carolina is among the most vulnerable parts of the Eastern United States to the effects of climate change . The barrier islands, which have served to protect the inland areas from devastating storms, may be overwhelmed and submerged by the end of the century. Via CNN / The Virginian Pilot Images via Claude Betancort and  Nicolas Marchildon

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Brand new island sprouts off the North Carolina coast

COBE transforms former grain silo into a swanky apartment in Copenhagen

June 28, 2017 by  
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At first glance, it’s hard to imagine that there’s anything old about this swanky new high-rise in Copenhagen . But behind its modern steel facade is the skeleton of a 17-story former grain silo, the largest industrial building in the city’s Nordhavn (North Harbor), that’s been transformed into a modern apartment block. Designed by COBE , the adaptive reuse project transforms the silo into new residences with an industrial chic interior that pays homage to the building’s roots. The transformed building, simply called The Silo, was created as part of COBE’s larger revitalization effort and masterplanning of Nordhavn’s post-industrial area. The Silo includes 38 unique residential units that range from 106 to 401 square meters, and also includes a restaurant with panoramic views on the upper floor and public events space on ground level. To remake the former urban eyesore into an eye-catching urban focal point, the architects wrapped the concrete silo in an angular faceted facade made of galvanized steel that doubles as a climate screen. Related: World’s first silo brewery opens in abandoned NY grain elevator “What makes The Silo is its monolithic appearance, stemming from the materiality and facility of its construction,” wrote COBE. “Its rational form and complex interior are a direct result of its original use and functions as a grain silo.” While the architects retained the concrete skeleton to preserve the silo’s industrial character, they also infused the building with more natural light and warmth to create welcoming and livable spaces. The silo’s different grain and storage functions created diverse spatial variation that gave way to unique apartment layouts. The apartments have varying floor heights, with some reaching heights of seven meters. + COBE Images via COBE

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COBE transforms former grain silo into a swanky apartment in Copenhagen

Infographic: How Poaching is Threatening to Wipe Out Lions, Elephants,and Rhinos in Africa

November 7, 2013 by  
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In 2013 the International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources conducted a survey on 70,294 species of animals around the world – and they found that over 30% of them fall into a threatened category. SuperScholar just launched a new infographic that shows the results of this alarming study and explores the factors threatening to wipe out three species in particular – rhinos , elephants , and lions . Check out the full infographic after the jump! Read the rest of Infographic: How Poaching is Threatening to Wipe Out Lions, Elephants,and Rhinos in Africa Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Africa , at risk animals , Biodiversity , boneyard , conservation , endangered animals , Environment , infographic , international union for the conservation of nature and natural resources , IUCN , threatened species , vulnerable species        

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Infographic: How Poaching is Threatening to Wipe Out Lions, Elephants,and Rhinos in Africa

Big Wave Surfers & Even Bigger Waves: Susan Casey Covers Them All in The Wave (Book Review)

December 30, 2010 by  
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A couple months ago Brian got a chance to talk with Susan Casey , author of the (fairly) recently released book The Wave: In Pursuit of the Rogues, Freaks and Giants of the Ocean , and ask her about the effect that climate change is having and will continue to have on our oceans. The verdict is that the biggest waves in the ocean seem to be becoming bigger and steeper

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Big Wave Surfers & Even Bigger Waves: Susan Casey Covers Them All in The Wave (Book Review)

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