How to ensure circular fashion is good for people and the environment

October 9, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on How to ensure circular fashion is good for people and the environment

How to ensure circular fashion is good for people and the environment Annelise Thim Fri, 10/09/2020 – 00:15 This article originally was published in the BSR Insight . The COVID-19 pandemic has thrown the fashion industry into disarray, leaving supply chain workers without wages and causing major global brands to file for bankruptcy. In the United States alone, 2.1 million retail workers lost their jobs due to the crisis. In Bangladesh, the garment sector is expected to lose over a million jobs by December, with over 70,000 workers already laid off. While many underlying issues are not new to the industry, the unprecedented situation has made us acutely aware of the fragilities of our current economic system and of just how vulnerable people — especially workers and their communities — are to significant business disruption. As our society looks to build back better by emerging from the crisis with a more resilient and sustainable system, many industries are planning to integrate circularity into their recovery plans. Indeed, even before the COVID-19 outbreak, circular economic models had been sprouting up at increasing speed in the fashion industry, both to counter its enormous environmental impact and to respond to economic opportunities. The textile industry alone produces 1.2 billion tons of CO2 per year and accounts for around 20 percent of global industrial water pollution . Companies, brands and designers are increasingly looking to circular fashion models, including resale, rental and repair, to mitigate these impacts. A strong signal of the circular fashion opportunity: Resale grew 25 times faster than the overall retail apparel market in 2019. While the potential positive environmental impact of a shift to a circular economy is enormous, few organizations are considering the social implications for the more than 60 million people in its value chain . Given the sheer size of the industry and the many ways people intersect throughout production and consumption, social implications, whether positive or negative, are unavoidable. Women, who comprise between 60 to 90 percent of total apparel workers, of whom an estimated 80 percent are women of color , likely will take the brunt of the impact due to their precarious working conditions and existing gender-based discrimination. BSR’s new brief, ” Taking a People-Centered Approach to a Circular Fashion Economy ,” explores the potential social impacts that may emerge from a mainstream shift to circular fashion . The textile industry alone produces 1.2 billion tons of CO2 per year and accounts for around 20 percent of global industrial water pollution. Informed by BSR’s research and stakeholder engagement supported by Laudes Foundation , an independent foundation tackling the dual crises of climate change and inequality, the brief proposes opportunities for businesses, policymakers and advisers to design circular fashion business models to be inclusive and fair from the outset. In addition, we provide a set of guiding questions for companies and organizations to practically think through the social impacts of their shifts to circular fashion models, aiming to avoid and mitigate negative social impacts and more consciously target positive social impacts. “The vision of ‘circular economy’ presents an economy that is compatible with nature, but we cannot take for granted that it will be inclusive,” said Megan McGill, senior program manager at Laudes Foundation. “BSR’s work is enabling us to ensure that in our pursuit for a regenerative and restorative economy, we are actively managing and promoting the rights and equity of people touched by the fashion sector.” This current period of complex disruption presents a unique opportunity to leverage the shift to circularity to address some of the global fashion industry’s persistent and pervasive environmental and social issues. By taking a people-centered approach, we can build a more resilient industry and respond to the calls from stakeholders — through safer inputs that increase the health and safety of workers and production communities, enabling creative and dignified employment, and building inclusive models adapted to the needs of a diverse consumer base. Supported by Laudes Foundation, BSR is continuing to explore the impacts of the shift to circular fashion on job opportunities and quality — a topic largely ignored in the circular transition to date and which we begin to delve into in this brief. Our current work aims to explore and develop responses to these impacts in collaboration with fashion companies and broader industry stakeholders. In addition, we will leverage strategic foresight in developing and testing practical recommendations with special focus on the U.S., Europe and India. This brief was developed by Cliodhnagh Conlon and Annelise Thim, with input from Laura Macias and Magali Barraja and with the support of Laudes Foundation. As we delve deeper into this topic, we are keen to hear feedback and learn from others who are working to ensure that the circular fashion transition delivers benefits for people. If you are currently working on circular fashion or would like to learn more about our work, please reach out to connect with the team. Pull Quote The textile industry alone produces 1.2 billion tons of CO2 per year and accounts for around 20 percent of global industrial water pollution. Contributors Cliodhnagh Conlon Topics Circular Economy Supply Chain Fashion Supply Chain Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Garment worker in Bangladesh, where the garment sector is expected to lose over a million jobs by December 2020, with over 70,000 workers already laid off. Photo by Jahangir Alam Onuchcha on Shutterstock.

Read the rest here:
How to ensure circular fashion is good for people and the environment

Forging a Resilient Circular Supply Chain

September 14, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Forging a Resilient Circular Supply Chain

Forging a Resilient Circular Supply Chain Where should supply chain management and circular strategy overlap, and how can your supply chain advance the circular economy? From repair and remanufacturing to material reclamation, there are numerous ways to fold circular principles into your company’s supply chain. But what does it take to build these circular initiatives throughout a dispersed supply chain? What ROI can these changes afford? Can a circular supply chain hold more resiliency than its linear counterpart? Join this session to hear from companies forging robust, resilient, circular supply chains. Learn about the challenges they’ve faced as well as the risk mitigation and value they’ve seen as reward. Speakers Stephanie Potter, Executive Director, Sustainability and Circular Economy, US Chamber of Commerce Foundation Deborah Dull, Product Leader, GE Digital George Richter, Senior Vice President, Supply Chain Management, Cox Communications, Inc. James McCall, Senior Director, Global Climate and Supply Chain Sustainability, Procter & Gamble This session was held at GreenBiz Group’s Circularity 20, August 25-27, 2020. Holly Secon Mon, 09/14/2020 – 09:39 Featured Off

See the original post:
Forging a Resilient Circular Supply Chain

Unilever unveils climate and nature fund worth more than $1 billion

June 16, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green, Recycle

Comments Off on Unilever unveils climate and nature fund worth more than $1 billion

Unilever unveils climate and nature fund worth more than $1 billion Cecilia Keating Tue, 06/16/2020 – 00:30 Unilever has announced it will invest €1 billion (about $1.12 billion based on exchange rates this week) over the next decade in efforts to tackle climate change and deliver on a new goal to ensure net zero emissions across its value chain by 2039. The consumer goods giant unveiled its new Climate and Nature Fund on Monday as it set out a raft of fresh sustainability goals, which include plans to end deforestation in its supply chain and communicate the carbon footprint of every product it sells. The new 2039 target builds on existing sustainability goals to reach carbon neutrality across its operations and halve its value chain emissions by the end of the decade. Unilever CEO Alan Jope emphasized the company intended to eschew a sustainability strategy that focused on emissions alone and instead take a holistic approach. “Climate change, nature degradation, biodiversity decline, water scarcity — all these issues are interconnected, and we must address them all simultaneously,” he said. “In doing so, we must also recognize that the climate crisis is not only an environmental emergency; it also has a terrible impact on lives and livelihoods. We, therefore, have a responsibility to help tackle the crisis: as a business, and through direct action by our brands.” To reach its new value chain emissions goal, Unilever said it would prioritize partnerships with suppliers committed to science-based climate targets and work with partners across the value chain to drive lower levels of greenhouse gas emissions. Under the plan, the Anglo-Dutch company said it intends to set up a new system where suppliers are required to declare the carbon footprint of the goods and services while invoicing. It also outlined its intention to work with other businesses and organizations to standardize emissions data collection, sharing, and communication. The new fund will support a raft of initiatives, including landscape restoration, reforestation, carbon sequestration, wildlife protection and water preservation projects, the company said. While it’s critical to address the impact that our products have at the end of their life, it’s just as important to continue to look at the impact they have on the planet at the start of their life … The firm also confirmed that it is aiming to achieve a deforestation-free supply chain by 2023. As such it pledged to increase traceability and transparency by using emerging digital technologies — such as satellite monitoring, geolocation tracking and blockchain systems — to enhance oversight, accelerate smallholder engagement and improve its approach to derivates sourcing. Marc Engel, chief supply chain officer at the company, said that empowering farmers would deliver a “step change” in regenerating nature. “If we want to have a healthy planet long into the future, we must also look after nature: forests, soil biodiversity and water ecosystems,” he said. “In most parts of the world, the economic and social inclusion of farmers and smallholders in sustainable agricultural production is the single most important driver of change for halting deforestation, restoring forests and helping regenerate nature. In the end, they are the stewards of the land.” Unilever also has committed to step up its efforts to preserve water, with plans to make all its “product formulations” biodegradable in order to minimize their impact on aquatic ecosystems. It also said it would implement water stewardship programs for local communities in 100 locations by the end of the decade. Jope concluded that the suite of new initiatives would complement the company’s ongoing mission to curb its reliance on virgin plastic. “While it’s critical to address the impact that our products have at the end of their life, it’s just as important to continue to look at the impact they have on the planet at the start of their life — in the sourcing of materials — as well as in their manufacture and transport,” he said. “We will reduce the impact that our products and our operations have on the environment, and we will do our part to bring the planet back to health.” Last year, the company pledged to halve its use of virgin plastic and ensure it collects and recycles more plastic packaging than it sells. The announcement came the same day as the publication of an open letter to governments from leading green businesses and NGOs, calling on policymakers to prioritize nature restoration projects as part of their imminent coronavirus economic stimulus packages. Pull Quote While it’s critical to address the impact that our products have at the end of their life, it’s just as important to continue to look at the impact they have on the planet at the start of their life … Topics Corporate Strategy Supply Chain Natural Climate Solutions Carbon Removal BusinessGreen Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) Off Duration 0 Sponsored Article Off Early evening view of Unilever office The Bridge in Feijenoord neighbourhood in Rotterdam

Original post:
Unilever unveils climate and nature fund worth more than $1 billion

Reducing global supply chain reliance on China won’t be easy

May 5, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Reducing global supply chain reliance on China won’t be easy

It’s unsustainable when nearly all supply chains from consumer goods to medical gear lead back to a single nation.

Here is the original post:
Reducing global supply chain reliance on China won’t be easy

Why global engagement is essential to sustainable supply chains

May 4, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Why global engagement is essential to sustainable supply chains

Four key considerations for infusing sustainability throughout your entire supply chain.

See the original post:
Why global engagement is essential to sustainable supply chains

Sustainable business in Asia: 5 trends that will impact a decisive decade

March 24, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Eco, Green

Comments Off on Sustainable business in Asia: 5 trends that will impact a decisive decade

Spoiler: Local teams will become increasingly important.

Read the rest here:
Sustainable business in Asia: 5 trends that will impact a decisive decade

How GPS mapping and satellite technology help reduce deforestation

March 19, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on How GPS mapping and satellite technology help reduce deforestation

Sponsored: Technology can play a critical role in identifying risk and accelerating progress to reduce cocoa-related deforestation in Africa.

More here:
How GPS mapping and satellite technology help reduce deforestation

Uniting business to tackle COVID-19

March 18, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Uniting business to tackle COVID-19

The U.N. Global Compact is issuing a special appeal for a corporate response to the pandemic: For all companies to take collective action.

Here is the original:
Uniting business to tackle COVID-19

COVID-19 and climate change: A healthy dose of reality

March 16, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on COVID-19 and climate change: A healthy dose of reality

Consider the global health crisis currently upon us as a warm-up act for a climate-changing world.

View original post here:
COVID-19 and climate change: A healthy dose of reality

Trend: Nutrient diversity goes beyond meatless meat

March 16, 2020 by  
Filed under Business, Green

Comments Off on Trend: Nutrient diversity goes beyond meatless meat

The potential of lab-grown and plant-based protein as a solution to climate change and world hunger has already generated a great deal of buzz.

Go here to read the rest:
Trend: Nutrient diversity goes beyond meatless meat

Next Page »

Bad Behavior has blocked 5021 access attempts in the last 7 days.