British supermarket chain launches trucks powered by food waste

February 13, 2017 by  
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Food waste has always been something of a bugbear with Waitrose , an upscale British grocer that stopped shoveling its leftovers into the landfill as early as 2012. It even packages some of its fusilli pasta in boxes made, in part, from recycled food scraps, which it says reduces the use of virgin tree pulp by 15 percent while lowering greenhouse-gas emissions by a fifth. But Waitrose wants to take the issue further, both literally and figuratively. The supermarket just announced that it’ll be running its delivery trucks entirely on biomethane gas generated from food waste—making it the first company in Europe to do so. Food waste is a looming concern in the United Kingdom. At a time when 8.4 million U.K. families struggle to feed themselves daily, the volume of household food waste continues to soar, amounting to an estimated 7.3 million metric tons in 2015. Waitrose, according to the Times , is partnering with CNG Fuels to juice up 10 of its trucks with 100 percent renewable biomethane. The trucks can run up to 500 miles—almost twice the current average—on what is essentially rotting food. “We will be able to make deliveries to our stores without having to refuel away from base,” Justin Laney of the John Lewis Partnership , which operates Waitrose, said in a statement on Thursday. Related: Toronto Rolls Out Biogas-Capable Garbage Trucks Because its biomethane costs 40 percent less than diesel, any upgrades will pay for themselves in two to three years, CNG Fuels said. “Renewable biomethane is far cheaper and cleaner than diesel, and, with a range of up to 500 miles, it is a game-changer for road transport operators,” CNG Fuels CEO Philip Fjeld said. Another plus? The alternative fuel emits 70 percent less carbon dioxide, which would give a much needed boost to the European Union’s pledge to cut its greenhouse-gas emissions by 40 percent by 2030 under the Paris Climate Agreement . + Waitrose Via Grubstreet

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British supermarket chain launches trucks powered by food waste

This Danish grocery store selling expired goods is so popular that it’s opening a second branch

December 5, 2016 by  
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Slashing food waste is becoming trendy in Denmark. A grocery store in Copenhagen called Wefood is peddling expired goods – and it’s become so popular that it’s opening a second branch in the district of Nørrebro. Like the first store, the Nørrebro Wefood will be staffed with volunteers and it will donate profits to charity . It’s legal to sell expired food in Denmark , provided the goods aren’t dangerous and are openly advertised. Project leader Bassel Hmeidan told The Guardian, “We look, we smell, we feel the product and see if it’s still consumable.” Local supermarkets and food producers donate items to Wefood, and volunteers collect them and sell them. Locals can obtain food items at a 30 to 50 percent discount. Related: Denmark’s first supermarket for expired groceries cuts nation’s food waste Wefood is operated by DanChurchAid , an organization combating poverty . According to DanChurchAid, 800 million people are hungry when they go to bed at night, but more than a third of food produced globally is thrown away. Money collected by selling food at Wefood goes back to DanChurchAid for “emergency aid and social protection schemes as well as projects promoting agro-ecological production,” according to the organization. Not only does Wefood aim to address poverty and hunger, but the store’s concept of selling expired food could help in the fight against climate change . DanChurchAid says the food industry releases 3.3 billion tons of greenhouse gases into Earth’s atmosphere when so much food is tossed out. While the innovative store allows Denmark to cut down on food waste, The Guardian points out it isn’t a place to do regular grocery shopping. Goods vary daily since the store depends on donations, but locals can find deals and support DanChurchAid through shopping at Wefood. As she grabbed a bottle of normally expensive olive oil for just around $2.85, shopper Signe Skovgaard Sørensen told The Guardian, “It’s awesome that instead of throwing things out they are choosing to sell it for money. You support a good cause.” + Wefood + DanChurchAid Via The Guardian Images via Wefood Facebook

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This Danish grocery store selling expired goods is so popular that it’s opening a second branch

Keeping cool: Supermarkets reduce emissions from refrigerators

November 6, 2012 by  
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Most supermarkets' refrigeration systems leak greenhouse gases into the air. Now some big companies, including Target and SuperValu, are partnering with the EPA to fix those leaks.

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Keeping cool: Supermarkets reduce emissions from refrigerators

Ostrich Eggs and Other Exotica Hit the Supermarkets

August 23, 2011 by  
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Photo: B. Alter Ostrich eggs, giant satsumos, yellow raspberries and $300 potatoes: are we bored yet? All kinds of exotic foods are hitting the supermarkets this summer. Let’s start with the ostrich eggs: they are big and expensive and it takes an hour to boil them. Make them for egg salad sandwiches–be the envy of your co-workers. … Read the full story on TreeHugger

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Ostrich Eggs and Other Exotica Hit the Supermarkets

How can I reuse or recycle till receipts & their rolls?

November 15, 2010 by  
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We’ve had an email from Roger: I was wondering Have you ever featured Till receipts on your website, I work in a supermarket and at least once a day i ‘run out’ of till receipt paper and have to replace it, But i’m sure there is at least 10% of the paper still on the roll, and if you add this up to all the tills in a store that’s a lot of wastage.

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How can I reuse or recycle till receipts & their rolls?

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