Dark unused garage is transformed into a cozy light-filled studio in San Francisco

July 31, 2017 by  
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The garage is the last place most people want to cozy up in, but that’s not so for the lucky owners of this beautiful garage-turned-studio space in San Francisco. Local architect Beverly Choe transformed an old, unused garage into the Clifford Studio, a dreamy, light-filled work studio and reading nook. Filled with suffused light and lined with timber, this adaptive reuse project is the perfect cozy hideout brought to life with minimalist decor with splashes of greenery and warm textures. The architect reimagined the garage, formerly a carriage house, as a “box for suffused light” painted shades of blue on the outside. A long skylight spans most of the building and natural light is filtered through the exposed beams that help minimize glare. Large glazed openings at the front and back of the studio let in more natural light and frame views of the outdoor sunken courtyard and garden. Board-formed concrete planters along the western and eastern sides of the courtyard relate to the timber-lined interior, creating a natural outdoor extension of the studio. The courtyard’s sunken profile also helps make the building appear taller. Related: Small and windowless garage in Lisbon transformed into an elegant modern loft Completed over the course of a year-and-a-half, the converted garage makes the most of a small space with the solid oak casework that forms walls of shelves, furnishings, and hidden storage. A blue-tiled bathroom is hidden off on the side of the oak paneling. The minimalist interior is open and airy and allows for flexibility of use, from a reading room to artist’s work studio. The architect treated natural light as a crucial material in the design process. + Beverly Choe Via Dwell Images by Mariko Reed

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Dark unused garage is transformed into a cozy light-filled studio in San Francisco

The brickwork inside this beautiful Tehran community center will blow your mind

March 3, 2017 by  
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Kalout Architecture Studio ‘s Imam Reza Cultural and Religious Complex in Tehran, Iran is a vibrant urban space that locals of all ages and social groups enjoy. To make the building’s ethos absolutely clear, the architects built the roof in the form of interlocking fingers, symbolizing “unity and social cohesion”. The beautiful 7000-square-meter center, which is located in the cultural zone of the capital, houses a mosque , an art gallery, a bookstore coffee shop, an amphitheater and an IT center. The building’s various functional zones are organized around the central glass-paneled dome in stone-clad wings. Related: Mosque for All: BIG Wins Competition To Design Inside-Out Albanian Cultural Center The dome arches over a traditional shabestan – an underground space typically found in Iranian houses, mosques, and schools. According to the architects, the unique design was influenced by both tradition and functionality, “The main form of the shabestan, with the grandeur of a religious space, provides the opportunity for a unique experience to fulfill the immemorial ambition to connect with the creator and feel the symbolic form of the dome. Following this main form, the side wings of the building with the supplementary functions rise from and rest on the ground to create an innovative form visually.” The dome is composed of handmade glass carved with the various words for god. On the exterior walkway, bricks are laid in an intricate pattern that runs the length of the walls. According to the architects, the two materials were used to represent the “ascending movement from earth to light”. Additional traditional features found in the complex include a sunken courtyard with a small reflecting pool, and a cedar statue that symbolizes “constancy, life and freedom”. + Kalout Architecture Studio Via Dezeen Photography by Parham Taghiof

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The brickwork inside this beautiful Tehran community center will blow your mind

The brickwork inside this beautiful Tehran community center will blow your mind

March 3, 2017 by  
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Kalout Architecture Studio ‘s Imam Reza Cultural and Religious Complex in Tehran, Iran is a vibrant urban space that locals of all ages and social groups enjoy. To make the building’s ethos absolutely clear, the architects built the roof in the form of interlocking fingers, symbolizing “unity and social cohesion”. The beautiful 7000-square-meter center, which is located in the cultural zone of the capital, houses a mosque , an art gallery, a bookstore coffee shop, an amphitheater and an IT center. The building’s various functional zones are organized around the central glass-paneled dome in stone-clad wings. Related: Mosque for All: BIG Wins Competition To Design Inside-Out Albanian Cultural Center The dome arches over a traditional shabestan – an underground space typically found in Iranian houses, mosques, and schools. According to the architects, the unique design was influenced by both tradition and functionality, “The main form of the shabestan, with the grandeur of a religious space, provides the opportunity for a unique experience to fulfill the immemorial ambition to connect with the creator and feel the symbolic form of the dome. Following this main form, the side wings of the building with the supplementary functions rise from and rest on the ground to create an innovative form visually.” The dome is composed of handmade glass carved with the various words for god. On the exterior walkway, bricks are laid in an intricate pattern that runs the length of the walls. According to the architects, the two materials were used to represent the “ascending movement from earth to light”. Additional traditional features found in the complex include a sunken courtyard with a small reflecting pool, and a cedar statue that symbolizes “constancy, life and freedom”. + Kalout Architecture Studio Via Dezeen Photography by Parham Taghiof

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The brickwork inside this beautiful Tehran community center will blow your mind

Bowl-shaped roofs harvest rainwater and promote natural cooling in arid environments

January 2, 2017 by  
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Water scarcity is felt unequally throughout the world with some regions worse off than others. Iran-based BMDesign Studios addressed their home country’s arid climates with an architectural solution to water shortages called Concave Roof, a double-roof system designed to collect and store rainwater, and promote natural cooling. The Concave Roof was engineered for arid environments, where rainwater collection can be tricky due to higher than average evaporation rates and low annual precipitation. The double-roof system, which includes a domed roof beneath a bowl-shaped catchment area, is designed to “help [make] even the smallest quantities of rain [flow down] the roof and eventually coalesce into bigger drops, just right for harvesting before they evaporate,” said the architects to ArchDaily . Stacking a concave roof atop a convex roof promotes natural cooling through shade and wind movement between the two roofs. Related: Rammed earth house blends traditional materials with modern techniques in Vietnam’s last frontier The bowl-shaped catchment area is steeply sloped to move raindrops towards a central collection point, where the rain is funneled into reservoirs . The reservoirs are placed between building walls to help regulate indoor temperatures. With this system, the architects estimate that 28 cubic meters of water could be harvested with just 923 square meters of a concave roof surface. BMDesign Studios’ vision also goes beyond the double-roof system and includes a massing design where the buildings and courtyards are sunken to promote natural cooling. The buildings would be organized around atriums to promote circulation and community. + BMDesign Studios Via ArchDaily Images via BMDesign Studios

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Bowl-shaped roofs harvest rainwater and promote natural cooling in arid environments

archimania’s Conservation Hall is a sunken extension that preserves a historic governor’s mansion

June 23, 2015 by  
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Read the rest of archimania’s Conservation Hall is a sunken extension that preserves a historic governor’s mansion Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Archimania , courtyard building , energy efficient building , green materials , inner courtyard , Memphis , Nashville , natural light , Recycled Materials , salvaged wood , sunken courtyard , underground building

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archimania’s Conservation Hall is a sunken extension that preserves a historic governor’s mansion

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