Insane new flying Iron Man suit will be 3D-printed

August 9, 2017 by  
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Hold onto your seats Marvel fans and tech enthusiasts. Before you know it, a real-life “Iron Man” suit will be on the market — and yes, it can fly. Developed by Richard Browning, the co-founder of start-up company Gravity , the jet engine-powered flying suit was designed to “re-imagine manned flight.” With two engine arm configurations that weigh up to 90 pounds and a temperature threshold of 700°C (1292°F), the highly-anticipated invention will also feature wings. And did we mention it will be 3D-printed? The Gravity jet engine-powered flying suit was unveiled at Comic-Con in San Diego, CA, where Browning dished details to Tested’s Adam Savage. The newest version of the suit is comprised of four arm-loaded thrusters and an additional jet pack that is strapped to the user’s back. As noted above, two engine arm configurations can reach temperatures of 700°C (1292°F). 3D Printing Industry reports that if handled responsibly, the rockets aren’t as dangerous as they first might seem. This is because the heat is quickly dispersed by the air which, in turn, reduces the risk of one’s boots or sneakers catching on fire. Browning explained that the movement of the suit is controlled by a very “intuitive” system. For instance, minor movements of the arms determine the direction and height by altering the jet’s vector. It helps that a DAQRI augmented reality (AR) helmet with a heads-up display is connected. Not only does the AR helmet monitor the suit’s performance, it shows the data of speed and altitude in real-time, eliminating the need to check one’s wrist. Browning flew the suit at Comic-Con, wowing comic fans and technology entrepreneurs . He was reportedly able to fly at a speed up to 45/50 mph. Right now, between seven and eight different versions of the suit are in development; modifications will affect the functionality and appearance of the suit. “We are working on a whole bunch of adaptations with the manufacturer,” said Browning “to make [the engines ] much more fit for what we’re now using them for, because clearly they weren’t designed for this.” Related: Stunning Europe Building facade shows off the beauty of 3D printing in Amsterdam The most exciting part of the next-generation suit is that it will be 3D-printed and will feature temperature proof, one-piece aluminum housing for the thrusters. Because the control modules are in need of improvements, the engine configuration will also be changed. Finally, wings will be added to the suit to change the pattern of flight from vertical to airfoil. I’m quite excited about that, Browning said. “We’ve fully CADed up a beautiful, organic inspired housing, and that’s being 3D printed now.” No further information has yet been obtained about the potential cost or release date of the real-life Iron Man suit. However, in the past, Browning informed interested buyers that a custom-built suit should cost approximately $250,000. + Gravity  Via 3D Printing Industry Images via Gravity  

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Insane new flying Iron Man suit will be 3D-printed

GM is selling an electric car in China that costs just $5,300

August 9, 2017 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Good news for Chinese consumers. This week, General Motors will start selling a tiny electric car which, after national and local electric vehicle incentives, costs just $5,300. From front to end, the Baojun E100 measures just 63 inches. And, when unleashed and fully charged, the two-seater can reach speeds of 62 miles per hour and travel about 96 miles on a single charge. The E100, which has been outfitted with a 39-horsepower electric motor, is Baojun’s first electric car. Prices for the vehicle begin at RMB 93,900, or approximately $14,000 before incentives. Amenities include an entertainment system with a 7-inch screen and built-in WiFi . For safety measures, all versions of the car have parking sensors and pedestrian alert systems. Those who invest in high-end models can also lock and unlock the car using a touchpad. According to data from LMC Automotive, Baojun — a mass-market car brand from General Motors’ SAIC-GM-Wuling joint venture — is China’s eighth most popular car brand. It ranks just below Volkswagen , Toyota, Honda, and Buick. Considering China presently accounts for 40 percent of all electric vehicles sold worldwide, it’s clear there is a demand for non-polluting vehicles. As a result, Baojun’s ranking may very well increase. Related: The world’s first all-electric sport utility truck is finally here – and it looks incredible So far, more than 5,000 people have registered to purchase the first 200 vehicles. Another 500 will be made available later this week. Reportedly, buyers will be chosen on a first-come-first-serve basis. A GM spokesperson revealed that the first sales will initially be limited to the Guanxi region of southern China. As the car becomes more popular, GM plans to sell the cars more widely in China . + Baojun E100 Via CNN Images via General Motors

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GM is selling an electric car in China that costs just $5,300

Could these “wearable biospheres” help us survive on alien planets?

December 21, 2014 by  
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Nothing says “fashion forward” like a living garment designed to help support human life in outer space, right? MIT researchers and German designers teamed up to create these eye-catching 3D printed suits, intended to be packed with bacteria and algae. The concept is that the suit could provide the critical elements necessary to sustain life. Instead of a bulky traditional spacesuit, an adventurous space dweller would don one of these “Wanderers” that feeds on sunlight or waste. READ MORE > Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags:

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Could these “wearable biospheres” help us survive on alien planets?

Cyberdyne Creates Mind-Controlled Robot Exoskeleton to Protect Fukushima Workers from Nuclear Radiation

October 19, 2012 by  
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This week Cyberdyne unveiled a robotic exoskeleton called HAL (Hybrid Assistive Limb) that allows its wearer to carry superhuman loads while shielding them from radiation. With the Fukushima nuclear disaster still fresh in Japan’s national memory, the research team designed HAL to aid workers in dismantling the damaged power plant. The most incredible part is that the suit can be controlled by brainwaves! A network of sensors monitors electric signals coming from the user’s brain and uses them to activate the robot’s limbs in unison with the worker’s, allowing them to move without supporting the suit’s weight. As such, the 130-pound suit is barely noticeable to those wearing it. Read the rest of Cyberdyne Creates Mind-Controlled Robot Exoskeleton to Protect Fukushima Workers from Nuclear Radiation Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: bionic suit , cyberdyne , exoskeleton suit , Fukushima , HAL , hybrid assistive limb , Iron Man , mind controlled robot exoskeleton , radiation protection , robots

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Fashion Designer Alexander Wang Sued for $450 Million for Running a “Sweatshop” in NYC

March 11, 2012 by  
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Last month, a group employees filed a lawsuit against Alexander Wang , alleging that the fashion designer was running a sweatshop in New York City’s Chinatown. The 30 plaintiffs are asking for $50 million for each of the suit’s nine charges, which include labor law violations, breach of agreement, and “unjust enrichment.” The lead plaintiff in the suit, 56-year-old Wenyu Lu, reported working 84 hours per week at Wang’s Chinatown factory, resulting in eye injuries and kidney stones. Wang, who reportedly earned $25 million in 2011, has denied the accusations. READ MORE > Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Alexander Wang , chinatown , couterre , Fashion , labor laws , NYC , sweatshops , work conditions

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Fashion Designer Alexander Wang Sued for $450 Million for Running a “Sweatshop” in NYC

Fashion Designer Alexander Wang Sued for $450 Million for Running a “Sweatshop” in NYC

March 11, 2012 by  
Filed under Eco, Green

Comments Off on Fashion Designer Alexander Wang Sued for $450 Million for Running a “Sweatshop” in NYC

Last month, a group employees filed a lawsuit against Alexander Wang , alleging that the fashion designer was running a sweatshop in New York City’s Chinatown. The 30 plaintiffs are asking for $50 million for each of the suit’s nine charges, which include labor law violations, breach of agreement, and “unjust enrichment.” The lead plaintiff in the suit, 56-year-old Wenyu Lu, reported working 84 hours per week at Wang’s Chinatown factory, resulting in eye injuries and kidney stones. Wang, who reportedly earned $25 million in 2011, has denied the accusations. READ MORE > Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: Alexander Wang , chinatown , couterre , Fashion , labor laws , NYC , sweatshops , work conditions

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Fashion Designer Alexander Wang Sued for $450 Million for Running a “Sweatshop” in NYC

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