Napkins and Tissues Made From Sugar Cane, Not Trees

October 1, 2018 by  
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No trees were harmed in the making of this toilet … The post Napkins and Tissues Made From Sugar Cane, Not Trees appeared first on Earth911.com.

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Napkins and Tissues Made From Sugar Cane, Not Trees

New report reveals the sugar industry paid Harvard scientists to promote sugar over fat

September 15, 2016 by  
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Over the years, there have been many disagreements in the health community about which foods are bad for us. New research from the University of California, San Francisco reveals that a major sugar industry trade group paid food scientists at Harvard University in the 1960s to blame dietary fats for heart disease . That move created a legacy whereby sugar got off easy, and made its way into nearly every type of processed and packaged food, while fat was vilified. This slanted misinformation campaign led directly to the rise of “low fat” and “reduced fat” foods, which health experts now say are even worse for you than full fat versions. Cristin E. Kearns , a postdoctoral fellow at UCSF, examined documents from Harvard, the University of Illinois and other libraries to unearth the damning evidence. In the 1960s,  heart disease was on the rise in America, and researchers began looking at sugar as a likely contributing factor. Kearns found that, when sugar industry giants got wind of the research trend, they worked swiftly to shut it down. The trade group Sugar Research Foundation (SRF) (now known as the Sugar Association) paid three Harvard scientists $6500 ($48,900 in 2016 dollars) to publish a report on heart disease that blamed fat and exonerated sugar. Related: 8 Vegan and gluten-free desserts made without refined sugar The scientists did exactly that. In a 1967 review of prior research on sugar, fat, and heart disease published in the New England Journal of Medicine, the Harvard team “minimized the link between sugar and heart health, and cast aspersions on the role of saturated fat,” the New York Times reported. At the time, SRF vice president and director of research John Hickson made the organization’s mission quite clear. Rather than discover the truth and work to protect Americans’ health and well-being, Hickson suggested that SRF “could embark on a major program” to counter “negative attitudes toward sugar.” Paying off scientists to publish biased reviews turned out to be the silver bullet to do just that. Now, with heart disease and obesity rates rocketing sky high, the healthcare system struggles to clean up the mess, while government leaders slowly but surely take measures to reduce the demand for sugary treats. Philadelphia was the first U.S. city to enact a “soda tax” earlier this year, and others are expected to follow in the fight to save Americans from the deadly white stuff . The study results were published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. Via Treehugger Images via Gunilla G/Flickr and Shutterstock

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New report reveals the sugar industry paid Harvard scientists to promote sugar over fat

New report reveals the sugar industry paid Harvard scientists to promote sugar over fat

September 15, 2016 by  
Filed under Green

Comments Off on New report reveals the sugar industry paid Harvard scientists to promote sugar over fat

Over the years, there have been many disagreements in the health community about which foods are bad for us. New research from the University of California, San Francisco reveals that a major sugar industry trade group paid food scientists at Harvard University in the 1960s to blame dietary fats for heart disease . That move created a legacy whereby sugar got off easy, and made its way into nearly every type of processed and packaged food, while fat was vilified. This slanted misinformation campaign led directly to the rise of “low fat” and “reduced fat” foods, which health experts now say are even worse for you than full fat versions. Cristin E. Kearns , a postdoctoral fellow at UCSF, examined documents from Harvard, the University of Illinois and other libraries to unearth the damning evidence. In the 1960s,  heart disease was on the rise in America, and researchers began looking at sugar as a likely contributing factor. Kearns found that, when sugar industry giants got wind of the research trend, they worked swiftly to shut it down. The trade group Sugar Research Foundation (SRF) (now known as the Sugar Association) paid three Harvard scientists $6500 ($48,900 in 2016 dollars) to publish a report on heart disease that blamed fat and exonerated sugar. Related: 8 Vegan and gluten-free desserts made without refined sugar The scientists did exactly that. In a 1967 review of prior research on sugar, fat, and heart disease published in the New England Journal of Medicine, the Harvard team “minimized the link between sugar and heart health, and cast aspersions on the role of saturated fat,” the New York Times reported. At the time, SRF vice president and director of research John Hickson made the organization’s mission quite clear. Rather than discover the truth and work to protect Americans’ health and well-being, Hickson suggested that SRF “could embark on a major program” to counter “negative attitudes toward sugar.” Paying off scientists to publish biased reviews turned out to be the silver bullet to do just that. Now, with heart disease and obesity rates rocketing sky high, the healthcare system struggles to clean up the mess, while government leaders slowly but surely take measures to reduce the demand for sugary treats. Philadelphia was the first U.S. city to enact a “soda tax” earlier this year, and others are expected to follow in the fight to save Americans from the deadly white stuff . The study results were published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. Via Treehugger Images via Gunilla G/Flickr and Shutterstock

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New report reveals the sugar industry paid Harvard scientists to promote sugar over fat

The Growroom explores how cities can feed themselves using local food-producing architecture

September 15, 2016 by  
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The Growroom was exhibited first at the CHART ART FAIR in Copenhagen, a fair that exhibits exceptional design from the Nordic region. According to Space10, the Growroom is meant to “spark conversations about how we can bring nature back into our cities, grow our own food and tackle the rapidly increasing demand for significantly more food in the future.” The Growroom is filled from floor to ceiling, end to end, with vegetables, herbs and other edible plants, with a cozy space in the center to reflect and relax. It is a beautiful way to explore how we can bring more food to our cities in a self-sustaining eco system that can supply hyper-local food that is seasonal, fresh and high quality. Growroom gives us “food that tastes better, is healthier for us, more nutritional and doesn’t put massive pressure on our dwindling supplies of fresh water nor our environment,” says Space10. Related: IKEA’s Space10 is working on on-site hydroponic farms for restaurants Earlier this month, people were able to step into the “farm” and experience the Growroom with every sense – from the smell of the plants to the light filtering in between the garden spaces. It’s easy to imagine how such a space could become a feature of every neighborhood, providing a green escape from city life that also provides nourishment . “We’re inviting [people] to step inside the growing green haven, smell and taste the abundance of herbs and plants, and hopefully it will spark passion about growing your own food in the future,” said Carla Cammilla Hjort, Director of Space10. Space10 co-created ‘The Growroom’ together with architects Mads-Ulrik Husum & Sine Lindholm, interaction designer Thomas Sandahl Christensen and gardener Sebastian Dragelykke, Tradium and Raaschou. Hjort says, “At Space10, we envision a future where we grow much more food inside our cities. Food producing architecture could enable us to do so.” + Space10

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The Growroom explores how cities can feed themselves using local food-producing architecture

Philadelphia makes a splash with first soda tax in major US city

June 17, 2016 by  
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Philadelphia is making a splash this week as the first major city in the United States to enact a “soda tax,” a levy assessed on sugar-sweetened and diet beverages. Thursday, the City Council voted 13-4 vote to approve the levy after months of tough negotiations and harsh criticism from the beverage industry. Mayor Jim Kenney touts the new soda tax as a victory, telling Philly.com the levy is a step toward “changing the narrative of poverty in our city.” The new soda tax , which will become effective January 1, will cost distributors 1.5 cents per ounce and will apply to thousands of products. The levy will apply to nearly every bottled, canned, or fountain beverage that contains either sugar or artificial sweetener. Baby formula and drinks that are more than 50 percent fresh fruit, fresh vegetables, or milk will be exempt from the levy. While Philadelphia’s soda tax, like many others, was motivated by a desire to raise awareness about consuming too much sugar, it’s uncertain at this time how long it will take for the financial impact of the levy to trickle down to consumers. Related: Berkeley becomes first U.S. city to approve a tax on soft drinks Still, the tax will be a financial boon for the city. It’s expected to raise $91 million annually , and the mayor previously suggested using the additional funds to establish a pre-kindergarten program open to all 3-and 4-year-olds in Philadelphia. “Philadelphia made a historic investment in our neighborhoods and in our education system,” Kenney said in a press release . “Today would not have been possible without everyone coming together in support of a fair future for every zip code.” The city’s new tax is similar in nature to the so-named “sugar tax” recently passed in the United Kingdom , which was also motivated by a desire to raise awareness of the unhealthy effects of consuming high quantities of sugar on a regular basis. Via PBS Images via Allen , James Losey/Flickr and Rex Sorgatz/Flickr

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Philadelphia makes a splash with first soda tax in major US city

Wolfgang Buttress Hive is brought back to life in the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew

June 17, 2016 by  
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First installed at the world expo last spring, the multi-award-winning Hive was disassembled at the end of the event and moved to the Kew Gardens, where it was reassembled as the UK’s first-ever rebuilt Expo pavilion. Its lattice-like design was inspired by the lifespan of the honeybee and “highlights the important role of bees and other pollinators in feeding the planet,” says Stage One. The complex structure comprises nearly 170,000 parts assembled in 32 horizontal layers with hexagonal cells for a metal honeycomb effect. Each piece was etched with a reference number to make reassembly a possibility. Related: Wolfgang Buttress-Led Team Wins Bid to Design 2015 UK Milan Expo Pavilion More than just an elaborate artwork, the Hive serves an educational purpose and guides visitors through a multi-sensory experience simulating a real beehive . An array of almost 1,000 LEDs line the Hive’s internal void and are complemented with orchestral sound recordings. Sensors that monitor activity within a real beehive at Kew control the light and sound intensity. The Hive will stay at the London gardens until the end of 2017. + Wolfgang Buttress + Stage One Via Dezeen Images via Stage One

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Wolfgang Buttress Hive is brought back to life in the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew

Cutting back sugar in your child’s diet can improve their health in just 10 days

October 31, 2015 by  
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Tonight, while the kiddos are piling up the sugary good stuff, keep in mind this latest research: a new study in the journal Obesity reveals that cutting back on sugar for just 10 days can improve your child’s health. For 10 days, children in the study reduced their sugar intake by 28% without changing anything else in their diet. In just 10 days, diabetes markers, blood pressure, cholesterol and triglycerides were lowered. READ MORE > image via Shutterstock

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Cutting back sugar in your child’s diet can improve their health in just 10 days

DIY Gift Idea: 7 Herbed Salts and Sugars for Cooking and Baking

November 26, 2014 by  
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Read the rest of DIY Gift Idea: 7 Herbed Salts and Sugars for Cooking and Baking Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: basil , cinnamon , cooking , gomashio , herb , herbs , lavender , lemon pepper , Rosemary , salt , seasoning salt , SPICE , Spices , sugar , summer savory , thyme , vanilla

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DIY Gift Idea: 7 Herbed Salts and Sugars for Cooking and Baking

Scientists in Croatia Train Honeybees to Detect Landmines

May 22, 2013 by  
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Honeybees have already done a great service to the human race. Between pollination, curing disease , and producing honey, it is hard to image how to be more appreciative. In Croatia, scientists have found another role for the intrepid insect. The country, which is set to join the European Union this July, contains thousands of unexploded landmines left over from the Balkan wars. Researchers at Zagreb University are working towards training honeybees to sniff out these underground weapons over a 750 square-kilometer where the devices are believed to remain. Read the rest of Scientists in Croatia Train Honeybees to Detect Landmines Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: balkan war , croatia , dogs , EU , european union , honeybee , landmine , nikola kezic , rats , sugar , tiramisu , tnt , train , zagreb university        

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Scientists in Croatia Train Honeybees to Detect Landmines

Drinking Coca-Cola Killed New Zealand Mom, Coroner Concludes

February 12, 2013 by  
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Liv friis-larsen / Shutterstock A 31 year old mother from New Zealand died three years ago from drinking too much Coca-Cola , a coroner has found. Natasha Harris was addicted to the beverage, according to her family, and drank up to 10 liters a day. If she went without, they said she would get “the shakes.” All of her teeth had been removed as a result of tooth decay, and some of her eight children inherited bad teeth as well. She died of cardiac arrest. Read the rest of Drinking Coca-Cola Killed New Zealand Mom, Coroner Concludes Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: caffeine , cardiac arrhythmia , Coca Cola , drinking too much coke , Health , New Zealand , News , sugar , the shakes , woman dies from coke

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Drinking Coca-Cola Killed New Zealand Mom, Coroner Concludes

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