Scientists puzzle over subterranean heat melting Greenland’s glaciers

January 23, 2018 by  
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Researchers have acquired evidence that heat emanating from deep below the Earth’s surface is contributing to the meltdown of Greenland’s glaciers. Though they have long suspected that a subterranean heat source was a factor in the melting glaciers, scientists were previously unable to determine the precise mechanism by which this occurred. Data gathered from Greenland’s Young Sound fjord region, a geologically active area featuring many hot springs in which temperatures can reach 140 degrees Fahrenheit, indicates that radiant heat loss is melting glaciers from the bottom up. This discovery will allow researchers to more accurately assess the stability of Greenland’s ice sheet and better predict sea level rise . The heat rising from below Greenland’s surface has loosened the lowest levels of glaciers, easing their slide into the sea. “There is no doubt that the heat from the Earth’s interior affects the movement of the ice, and we expect that a similar heat seepage takes place below a major part of the ice cap in the northeastern corner of Greenland,” wrote Søren Rysgaard, lead author of the study published in Scientific Reports . The heat source is known as a geothermal heat flux, an ancient phenomenon found throughout the planet. In Greenland, the heat percolates from below the surface up through fjords, warming deep sea temperatures that then transfer this heat to the surrounding glaciers . Related: 512-year-old Greenland shark may be the oldest living vertebrate on Earth Because geothermal heat fluxes are difficult to assess, “our results are very unique because we determined the relatively small heat flux from a decade-long warming of an almost stagnant water mass,” co-author Jørgen Bendtsen told Newsweek . Earth’s heat circulating up through the fjords of Greenland is one of several factors contributing to the melting glaciers. Rising air and sea temperature, precipitation , and the unique qualities of the ice sheet also affect the speed of glacier melting. Via Newsweek Images via Wieter Boone ,  Mikael Sejr , and  Søren Rysgaard

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Scientists puzzle over subterranean heat melting Greenland’s glaciers

This floating hotel and spa in Sweden will fill you with wanderlust

January 23, 2018 by  
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The team behind the famous Treehotel in Sweden just unveiled plans for a new floating hotel and spa on the Lule River in that will fill you with wanderlust. The Arctic Bath Hotel and Spa might be the perfect place to enjoy the Northern Lights and work on your well-being while being surrounded by stunning landscapes. As a company that specializes in luxury adventure holidays, Off the Map Travel aims to provide people with exotic travel options and allow them to reach authentic destinations. The newest addition to their handpicked offering is this floating hotel and spa that freezes into the ice in the winter and floats on top of the Lule River in the summer. Related: Floating sauna with charred timber cladding boasts minimal site impact The Arctic Bath Hotel and Spa is a circular building that will house a spa treatment room, four saunas , an outside cold bath, a hot bath, outside and inside showers, and two dressing rooms for visitors. The six hotel rooms included also float or remain frozen into the ice, depending on the time of year. The project is being built using locally available materials and will be open for overnight stays as soon as early 2018. + Off the Map Travel Via AFAR

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This floating hotel and spa in Sweden will fill you with wanderlust

Researchers decipher one of last unpublished Dead Sea Scrolls

January 23, 2018 by  
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Since the first Dead Sea Scrolls were found in a Qumran cave in 1947, most have been restored and published. But the University of Haifa said two researchers from their Department of Bible Studies deciphered one of the last remaining unpublished scrolls – and they uncovered some surprises. Eshbal Ratson and Jonathan Ben-Dov reassembled around 60 fragments – some smaller than 0.155 square inches – that an earlier researcher said had come from different scrolls in a period of over one year. The University of Haifa researchers found these pieces “actually constitute a single scroll,” according to the university, and discovered for the first time that the name given to “special days marking the transitions between the four seasons” by the Judean Desert sect is Tekufah. This word in today’s Hebrew means ‘period.’ Related: Believed tomb of Jesus Christ is far older than previously thought The researchers also obtained new insight into the 364-day calendar the sect used. They said in a statement, “The lunar calendar, which Judaism follows to this day, requires a large number of human decisions. People must look at the stars and moon and report on their observations, and someone must be empowered to decide on the new month and the application of leap years. By contrast, the 364-day calendar was perfect. Because this number can be divided into four and seven, special occasions always fall on the same day…The Qumran calendar is unchanging, and it appears to have embodied the beliefs of the members of this community regarding perfection and holiness.” Another finding was that a scribe corrected errors made by the person who wrote the scroll. The researchers said the author “made a number of mistakes” and another scribe added in “missing dates in the margins between the columns of text.” The Journal of Biblical Literature published the work, and the researchers now plan to decipher the last remaining scroll. + University of Haifa Via The Jerusalem Post and the BBC Images via Haifa University/The Jerusalem Post and Depositphotos

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Researchers decipher one of last unpublished Dead Sea Scrolls

Tokyo subways sprout underground farms

August 14, 2015 by  
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Under the streets of Tokyo, there is a hidden secret that most people would never imagine – and it’s delicious. It’s not an off-the-map soba shop or some tucked away sushi joint, but a farm. Tokyo Salad is the new underground agriculture experiment run by Tokyo Metro – the folks who manage the subway lines. The Metro launched the subterranean hydroponic farm this past January, and it is already providing greens and sprouts to local restaurants. Read the rest of Tokyo subways sprout underground farms

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Earth-Covered Subterranean River Sauna Heats up a Sizzling View in Norway

September 14, 2012 by  
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Read the rest of Earth-Covered Subterranean River Sauna Heats up a Sizzling View in Norway Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: “natural materials” , earth covered , eco design , green design , Jensen & Skodvin , Juvet Landscape Hotel , minimalist , norway , River Sauna , small footprint , subterranean , sustainable design

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Earth-Covered Subterranean River Sauna Heats up a Sizzling View in Norway

Landscaped Concrete Slab Disguises Punibach Hydroelectric Plant in Italy

September 14, 2012 by  
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Read the rest of Landscaped Concrete Slab Disguises Punibach Hydroelectric Plant in Italy Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: alpine , Daylighting , eco design , green design , green roof , hydroelectricity , italy , Monovolume Architects , Punibach Hydroelectric Plant , sustainable design

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Landscaped Concrete Slab Disguises Punibach Hydroelectric Plant in Italy

Lugo’s Weathered-Steel History Museum Keeps Cool Inside Subterranean Cylinders

August 12, 2011 by  
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The cylindrical Lugo History Museum in Spain attracts a throng of curious people, which is great, except that they also come with a load of fossil-fueled vehicles that litter the beautiful landscape. Nieto Sobejano Arquitectos came up with the perfect solution: park the the cars and the museum underground. Not only does this keep the vehicles out of view, but the thermal inertia ensures maximum energy efficiency as well. The weathered-steel buildings are reached via a spiral staircase that leads beneath a sheet of green grass. This extends as far as Lugo’s urban park, ensuring an uninterrupted reach of green spaces where there was once a thriving industrial zone. And If this isn’t enough green goodness for you, note that the architects have also made room for energy-generating solar panels . Read the rest of Lugo’s Weathered-Steel History Museum Keeps Cool Inside Subterranean Cylinders Permalink | Add to del.icio.us | digg Post tags: eco design , green design , green spaces , Lugo history museum , Nieto Sobejano Arquitectos , passive design , solar panels , Solar Power , Spain , subterranean , sustainable design

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Lugo’s Weathered-Steel History Museum Keeps Cool Inside Subterranean Cylinders

World’s First Carbon Capture and Storage Project in Basalt Begins in USA

October 27, 2010 by  
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Washington state’s Department of Ecology has just granted the permit for the world’s first pilot test of carbon capture and sequestration in continental flood basalt near a paper mill in Wallula. With the permit approved, the Wallula pilot will start injecting 1,000 tons of CO 2 into a 4,000-foot well at Wallula, Washington, by January. It will take about two weeks.

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